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Author:Admin2
In this 1970 photo at left, Msgr. Salvatore J. Adamo has his picture taken on a Camden street, standing in a hole that damaged his car tire when he drove over it. He complained to PSE&G, whose workers had left the hole, and it was repaired within 24 hours. Msgr. Adamo, then executive editor of the Catholic Star Herald, ran the above photo, and another showing the hole repaired, in the paper. Msgr. Salvatore J. Adamo’s passionate views on abortion, racism, poverty and other topics were widely read for years in the Catholic Star Herald, the Philadelphia Daily News, Courier-Post, and Press of Atlantic City. His columns and outspoken opinions were considered crusading by some, outrageous by others. “While he was accused of enjoying controversy, he would half-heartedly deny it, saying that the church would progress only by dealing publicly with improving what needed improvement,” Father Robert Gregorio wrote about his friend after he died on Jan. 20, 2001, at the age 81. “In his fight to maintain his status as pastor after the canonical age of retirement, in his attempt to build a parish building without approval of the diocese, in his impatence with the Roman curia, he was the bane of many,” Father Gregorio continued. But, he added, many, including some bishops and fellow priests, admired his fighting spirit. The ninth of 10 children, Msgr. Adamo was born in Hell’s Kitchen, New York, and attended St. Joseph’s Seminary in Dunwoodie, and St. Mary’s Seminary in Roland Park, Baltimore, before being ordained a priest of the Camden Diocese on March 17, 1945. He was executive editor of the Catholic Star Herald from 1962-77, and his column appeared in the Philadelphia Daily News for 30 years. The Courier-Post and Press of Atlantic City also ran his pieces, as did Natonal Catholic Reporter and America. His opinions prompted frequent letters to the editor, pro and con. He was pastor of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Berlin, 1956-67, after which he became rector of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Camden, where he served from 1967-84. From 1984-95, he was pastor of St. Vincent Pallotti, Haddon Township, after which he retired. Msgr. Adamo also served at Holy Spirit Parish, Atlantic City; Sacred Heart, Camden; St. Michael, Minotola; St. Michael, Atlantic City; and St. Cecilia, Pennsauken. In 1963, he was the recipient of the Human Relations Award from the Philadelphia Chapter of the American Jewish Committee, and he served on the New Jersey Commission on Capital Punishment and the Camden Economic Development Advisory Committee. Researched by Peter G. Sanchez and James A. McBride
Friday, 27 April 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Bishop Joseph Galante
When I became bishop in the Diocese of Camden in 2004, my first goal was to listen to your concerns about the future of our church. As a result, I visited all our parishes and conducted listening sessions. One regular theme I heard was how so many of us are missed every Sunday around the Eucharistic table. I heard in particular the anguish of lifelong, faith-filled Catholics, whose sons and daughters have fallen from regular practice. As a result, we’ve made evangelization, particularly to young adults, a priority. Next month, we hope to spark discussion when we unveil the results of a study the diocese commissioned on the faith lives of the population of the six counties of South Jersey that comprise the Diocese of Camden. We hope this discussion will give us a better understanding of how to reach inactive Catholics. The study was done by the Barna Group, a firm which specializes in studying faith values and beliefs. What we asked Barna to do was to take a no-holds barred view of our community, particularly probing how we can better bring non-practicing Catholics back to the Eucharistic table. We will be presenting the full picture soon, but I’ll offer a small preview here. What Barna discovered was that roughly a third of the people in our area describe themselves as Catholics; of that number, roughly half attend Mass at least once a month and consider faith to be important in their lives. In our discussions here, that level of faith participation, while not nearly enough, was better than what we anticipated. What intrigued me in particular in Barna’s data was its conclusion about why so many self-described Catholics don’t attend weekly Mass. While much attention has been focused on disputes about Church teaching, what was intriguing about the study was the high number of people who don’t attend simply because they have other priorities. Catholic respondents who don’t attend Mass frequently say they are distracted by other concerns, including work, sports and family time, which become a pull on weekend activities. We need to emphasize that worship time can also be a part of family time as well. These findings are both troubling — to those of us imbued with the great gift of Catholic spirituality Sunday Mass remains a high point — it is also a challenge as we begin to deepen our evangelization efforts. We need to address a wide range of questions, such as: How can we make the relationship with Jesus and His Father important to people? How do we help people get anchored in a world that tosses them around via hardships of unemployment, family concerns, health issues, immigration matters and education? I am determined that the Barna Study of our diocese will not languish on bookshelves. I hope it will become a guidepost as we chart our way in engaging the wider culture of South Jersey. It will be made available on our diocesan website, and excerpts will be published in our parish bulletins and in the Catholic Star Herald. In future months, we intend to present a plan to address our evangelization concerns so well highlighted in this study. Maybe you have some ideas as well. Why do so many self-described Catholics not attend weekly Mass? What can the Church do to help bring them back? I’m interestied in hearing what you have to say. Please address concerns via email to Peter Feuerherd, our communications director, at Peter.Feuerherd@camdendiocese.org, or via post directly to me at 631 Market St., Camden, NJ 08102.
Friday, 27 April 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Sister Loretta Marie Schultz, a teacher for more than 50 years, died of a heart attack on April 22 at Maria Health Care Center in Baltimore. She was 90 years old and had been a professed member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame for 68 years. Loretta Marie Schultz was born on March 21, 1922, the sixth of eight children to Theresa and John Schultz of Camden. She entered the School Sisters of Notre Dame in Baltimore in August 1941. Sister Loretta taught at schools in Baltimore and Pennsylvania. She also taught at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Elementary in Camden, 1962-65. On retiring from the school setting in 1997, she returned to live in Baltimore and volunteered as a tutor at Caroline Center, the job training and education center for economically disadvantaged women that is sponsored by SSND. After retiring to Villa Assumpta, the residence for retired sisters in Baltimore, she continued to volunteer as a GED tutor for Villa Assumpta employees. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated April 26, in the Chapel at Villa Assumpta. Burial followed at Villa Maria Cemetery in Glen Arm, Md. Sister Loretta is survived by a brother, Leonard M. Schultz of Hattiesburg, Miss., and several nieces and nephews.
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Spanish-speaking Catholics participate in a Good Friday devotion at St. Jude Church, Our Lady of Hope Parish, Blackwood. In the midst of many changes that the Catholic Church is undergoing at the present time, one is the adaptation of the church to the presence of many Spanish-speaking Catholics who have arrived from different countries. In the past, the Catholic church responded to immigration by establishing “national parishes” that served the immigrants from a particular country. Parishes were referred to as the “Italian Parish,” or the “Polish Parish,” or the “Irish Parish.” Usually, the language of the country of origin was used throughout the parish for homilies, religious education and even in all the subjects taught in the Catholic school of that parish. The latest wave of immigration has created a new challenge for the Catholic Church. Immigrants are no longer clustering in one section of our cities. Instead, they are finding homes throughout the cities, in rural settings (especially trailer parks) and, occasionally, in suburban communities. In addition to the uneven distribution of the new immigrants, a second big difference between the immigrants of the past and those of the present day is that they do not attend the Catholic schools. This has occurred for several reasons, including the fact that the schools no longer offer classes in the language of the original country and the tuition for the schools (which were once free to the Catholic populace) is beyond their reach. Today the Diocese of Camden is trying to welcome the immigrant Catholics by offering liturgies, religious education and other ministries in the language of the sending countries. In several parishes, there are monthly Masses for the Filipino Community, the Indian Catholics who celebrate the Syro-Malabar Rite of the Catholic church, and the Korean Community. A different reality exists for the Spanish-speaking. First, their numbers are very large, second, they are widely dispersed throughout the diocese and thirdly, they come from many countries. One approach now being attempted by the Diocese of Camden is to assign one priest to serve the Latino peoples in several parishes. This is happening in several places in the diocese, including St. Joseph Parish in Somers Point and St. Francis Cabrini, Ocean City, who share the cost of a Spanish-speaking priest for the two parishes. Similar arrangements exist in other parishes. Along the Black Horse Pike, a different situation exists. There one parish at the northern end of the Pike, where it meets Route 130, has been celebrating the Sunday Mass in Spanish for 11 years. Another parish about 10 miles south, St. Charles Borromeo in Sicklerville, has celebrated an annual Mass on the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe (Dec. 12) every year since 2005. Most of the people who attended that Mass, however, came from Williamstown, the Parish of Our Lady of Peace. In between these two sites, concentrations of Latinos exist in Blackwood, Runnemede and Bellmawr. Smaller numbers of Latinos live in Gloucester, Mt. Ephraim, Turnersville and Brooklawn. In order to welcome these Catholics to the diocese and to serve them, a priest was assigned to minister to all of the Spanish-speaking people in 10 parishes along the Black Horse Pike and down Route 130 South. Currently Father Kenneth Hallahan is assigned to this ministry. He celebrates the liturgy on Saturday evening at St. Maurice Church (St. Joachim Parish) in Brooklawn and Sunday mornings in St. Joan of Arc Church (St. Josephine Bakhita Parish, Camden) and St. Jude Church (Our Lady of Hope Parish, Blackwood). One of the salient characteristics of the Spanish ministry is the celebration of dimensions of the faith that are specific to the local communities. Each Latin American country has Mary as a patroness. Each country, though, honors Mary under a different title. Thus, in St. Josephine Bakhita Parish (St. Joan of Arc Church), the people celebrate the feasts of Our Lady of Divine Providence (Puerto Rico), Our Lady of Charity of Cobre (Cuba), the “Purisima” or the Immaculate Conception (Nicaragua), Our Lady of Guadalupe (Mexico) and “Alta Gracia” or Our Lady of Divine Grace (Dominican Republic). Each feast day has its own story and its own symbols. For example, the symbol for “Alta Gracia” is the orange tree. A statue of Mary, with Joseph in the background and the baby Jesus in the foreground, is surrounded by orange trees to recall the site of the appearance, or the display of the painting of the Holy Family, in an orange grove in the Dominican Republic. The Mexicans, too, bring their own customs of celebrating the faith. For example, on the feast of the Epiphany, they bake a special cake called the “Rosca del los Reyes” (the “spiral of the kings”). The cake contains a tiny plastic statue of the Infant Jesus. Whoever gets the baby Jesus in their piece of cake gets special notice — either good luck or the obligation to make the cake the following year! On Feb. 2 (or the closest Sunday), the feast of the Presentation, or Candelmas Day (which used to conclude the Christmas season for all Catholics), the Mexicans bring statues of the Infant Jesus to the church to be blessed. Like many European Catholics who have a special devotion to the Infant of Prague, the Mexicans have a special devotion to the Infant Jesus of the Presentation. The church of the Diocese of Camden is enriched by the many customs, foods and music brought by today’s immigrants, said Father Hallahan. By supporting the ministry to the Latinos along the Black Horse Pike and Route 130, the 10 parishes are adapting to a new situation, but still fulfilling the traditional Catholic value of welcoming the immigrants and encouraging them to maintain both their faith and their cultures, he said.
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
Mother’s Day can be especially hard for those who have lost a child. That’s why Betty Pearce set the Monday after Mother’s Day as the time for a Mass of remembrance and healing at her parish, St. Joseph’s in Sea Isle. The parish has been hosting this Mass for at least 10 years, bringing many of the same families back to the parish for this evening of healing and remembrance. Pearce constructs a memorial display for the photos that parents bring and works with Msgr. Michael Mannion, the celebrant, to coordinate the readings and the music to further the sense of peace and calm at the Mass. For some families the most healing time is when they have an opportunity to have an individual blessing from one of the concelebrating priests at the conclusion of the evening. This year’s Mass will be celebrated on Monday, May 14, at 7 p.m. at St. Joseph’s Church in Sea Isle. Families are asked to bring a photo or other remembrance of their child with them. For more information or for directions to the church, please call 609-425-3553.
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
The readings were from the Children’s Lectionary and the homily was kept to four minutes. And when the Mass was over there was a scavenger hunt for children and their families. Each family was given an envelope filled with photographs of sacred objects in the church, such as statues, Stations of the Cross or the tabernacle. The children searched for the objects in the church and the parents explained the meaning behind the object. It was the Mass of Welcome and Inclusion for Individuals and Families with children with special needs at the Catholic Community of Christ Our Light in Cherry Hill. The monthly Mass is “more welcoming and inclusive to individuals with disabilities, and their families so that all people can participate in a more meaningful way in the celebration of the Eucharist” said Sister Bonnie McMenamin, co-director of the Diocesan Office of Ministry With the Deaf/Persons with Disabilities. During the Prayer of the Faithful, Father Thomas Newton, the pastor and celebrant, welcomed and prayed for all those with disabilities, and highlighted the gifts that persons with disabilities bring to the Catholic Church. In family activities like the scavenger hunt, “the children are free to roam around the church and become more comfortable with the environment.” Sister Bonnie said. “It brings the families together and gives them an opportunity to live the Eucharist by sharing their faith.” In addition to bringing families together, the community itself is drawn together as the Mass encourages all parishioners to “be supportive, welcoming and aware of those individuals and families with children with special needs.” The next Inclusion Mass for Families with Children with Special Needs will be celebrated at the Catholic Community of Christ Our Light, Cherry Hill, on Saturday, May 5, at 4:30 p.m. For more information on Masses of Welcome and Inclusion, contact Sister Bonnie McMenamin, SSJ at bmcmenamin@camdendiocese.org or 856-583-6111.
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Photos by Alan M. Dumoff, ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com Deacon Luis Correra, winner of the Spiritual Outreach and Dedication Award, stands with Father Yvans Jazon on Friday, April 27, at Atlantic City Country Club, where St. Monica Parish, Atlantic City, held its biennial Mother Lewis Dinner. The night remembered the foundress of St. Monica Parish, Emma “Mother” Lewis, who formed community among African-American Catholics in the early part of the 20th century, and recognized honorees Lois Shepperson (Spirit of Mother Lewis); Bernard Reynolds (Lifelong Service to St. Monica); Fritz Jean-Charles (Spiritual Outreach and Dedication); and Rita Mack (Outstanding Community Service). Catholic Charities’ Justice For ALL Awards Dinner took place on Wednesday, April 25, at Adelphia Caterers, Blackwood, to recognize individuals for their work in the pursuit of social justice. The honorees included Dr. Thomas A. Cavalieri, (Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio Award for Leadership); Ann M. Budde (Sister Grace Nolan Award for Social Ministry); Deacon William Johnson (Peter J. O’Connor Award for Social Justice); and Joseph Balzano (posthumous, Msgr. Michael Doyle and Msgr. Robert McDermott Award for Parish and Community Ministry). At left, Msgr. Roger McGrath, vicar general, stands with Frank Balzano, who accepted the award for his brother, Joseph.
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
When Thomas J. Kenney, Jr. died on Jan. 27, 1991, at the age of 66, more than 2,500 mourners came to his viewing. Such was the renown and likeability of Kenney, a high school football coach, restaurateur, businessman and Camden County freeholder. Born in Camden, Kenney went to high school at St. Joseph’s Prep in Philadelphia, where he excelled as a guard, making the all-city and all-state squads. He moved on to the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass., where he was quarterback and captain of the football team. In 1946, after serving in the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant, Kenney was asked to coach the Fighting Irish football team of Camden Catholic High School, in Cherry Hill, which for the five previous years had been suspended. Under his eight-year tenure, the football team was revived and became one of the best in the area, amassing a 53-13-4 record. Recognizing his efforts, the school posthumously inducted Kenney into its inaugural Hall of Fame class in 2007, and named the school’s gymnasium after him. Kenney was also a member of the New Jersey Coaches Hall of Fame, the South Jersey Coaches Hall of Fame, and the National Football Foundation Hall of Fame. Outside of football, Kenney was known for his work as an account executive for Chesapeake Packaging Corp; as a Camden County freeholder, and eventually its board’s director; and for helping operate his family’s two restaurants, Kenney’s Restaurant in Camden, and Kenney’s Suburban House in Cherry Hill. Moving to Merchantville in 1950, Kenney was a long-time parishioner at St. Peter Parish and was involved with its Holy Name Society. He also was a member of the Knight of Columbus, Santa Maria Council 1443; a member of Friends of the Sacred Heart; Commissioner of the Garden State Midget Football League; and co-founder of the Merchantville Boys Basketball League. Known also for his oratorical skills, Kenney was invited to countless Communion breakfasts and dinner functions as a guest speaker. Researched by Peter G. Sánchez and James A. McBride
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
• The proportion of unchurched residents is both an opportunity and a challenge for the Camden Diocese. The opportunity lies in the sheer size of the unchurched population which, proportionally, exceeds even the national average. The challenge is likely to be the personal experiences and perceptions of these unchurched adults which, as a result, may make them less receptive to messages about God, faith, and the church. • Masses and special events during Christmas and Easter present an opportunity to gently invite lapsed Catholics and those who do not attend regularly back into the fold. • A personal invitation to attend a church service or event — especially when the person making the invitation accompanies the invitee – is a highly effective means of attracting new visitors to churches. Some Catholics in the Diocese may benefit from reminders and encouragement to do so. • Despite very busy lives these days, people find the time for what they value. By citing a lack of time or simply preferring to do something else on their day off, these non-attendees are really saying that they find no value in church services or participation in worship. • Lapsed Catholics will need a compelling reason to attend or return to Mass and church involvement that is presented in a grace-filled and non-judgmental manner. • The findings regarding changes in faith are consistent with our own research on the topic – especially with regard to the ages when that change tends to occur. The pre-teen and teenage years are the times when people develop their frames of reference for the remainder of their lives — especially theologically and morally. • The church has an uphill battle in terms of reversing some impressions among southern New Jersey residents. For the Catholic Church at large, unfavorable opinions are the primary concern. More locally, the issue is lack of awareness of who the church is, what it does, and how it demonstrates the love of Christ to those it serves — especially within the community. • Parents, churches and schools in the diocese must provide clear and consistent explanations of biblical truths as well as model Christ-like behavior in an effort to enhance the spiritual development of young people in the community. • The church experience in the area varies; those attending Catholic churches feel less of a spiritual impact compared to those attending other Christian churches. • Familiarity, community, and an enhanced relationship with God are among the primary benefits of being a Catholic.
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Results of a survey of religious attitudes in South Jersey — and how to address concerns raised by the survey — are likely to be talked about in local parishes and diocesan offices for a long time. Bishop Joseph A. Galante, writing in the Catholic Star Herald last week, said he hopes the study will “spark discussion” and “give us a better understanding of how to reach inactive Catholics.” The study is essentially meant to be a tool of the new evangelization — finding new and effective ways to proclaim the Gospel. The diocese’s efforts to reach out to the unchurched, and to lapsed Catholics, is a local reflection of one of Pope Benedict XVI’s major concerns. Last year the pope created the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization. At the council’s first meeting on June 1, the pope said he hoped members would help outline a plan for the whole church in regards to the urgent task of evangelization, which must include formation, especially for young people. Young people are a major concern of the local survey, which shows that “their expectations of church are quite different than those of older adults.” “In addition,” the study states, “they face unique social, economic, technological, and other challenges. While a potentially difficult population to reach and retain, young adults may present a significant opportunity for the Camden Diocese.” The study, done for the diocese by the Barna Group, a California-based firm known for its work on U.S. religious attitudes, took an extensive look at the beliefs and practices of the six South Jersey counties (Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem) covered by the diocese. The Barna Group interviewed a representative sampling of adults from South Jersey. They were asked about their prayer lives, their belief or disbelief in God, and their attitudes toward the Catholic Church, among other questions. Results indicated that four out of every five South Jerseyans identify themselves as Christian, with a third identifying themselves as Catholic, a third Protestant, and the rest not identified with a specific faith tradition. About 10 percent of those responded said they were atheists or agnostic. Of those who identified as Catholic, about half practice their faith. Among other findings: — Among self-identified Catholics and Christians who have not attended church within the past six months, the primary reasons for non-attendance include: not having enough time to attend or get involved in church (38%); having the day off and preferring to spend it doing others things (32%); having to work (either themselves or a family member) on the day of worship (31%); or not having found a church they like despite visiting some churches (30%). — Four out of every 10 residents are “unchurched” (i.e., have not attended a church worship service other than a special event within the past six months). The proportion of unchurched adults within the diocese is significantly higher than the national average (29%). “In future months, we intend to present a plan to address our evangelization concerns so well highlighted in this study,” Bishop Galante said. He also encourged Catholics of the diocese to comment on the study and evangelization concerns. Comments can be sent via email to Peter Feuerherd, diocesan communications director, at Peter.Feuerherd@camdendiocese.org, or directly to Bishop Galante at 631 Market St., Camden, NJ 08102. Bishop Galante was scheduled to hold a press conference on the study on Thursday, May 3, the day after the Catholic Star Herald is printed. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Results of the Diocese of Camden Community Study 2012, conducted by the Barna Group, are available on the Camden Diocesan website www.camdendiocese.org
Thursday, 03 May 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report


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