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Author:Admin2
Photo by James A. McBride Worshippers carrying icons process into St. Charles Borromeo Church, Sicklerville, at the Mass of Remembrance for the Ugandan Martyrs on June 3. The second annual Mass of Remembrance for the Ugandan Martyrs was celebrated Sunday, June 3, at St. Charles Borromeo Church in Sicklerville. Bishop Joseph A. Galante presided and Father Alfred Mugujakisa, of Uganda, was the chief celebrant and homilist. Music was provided by the Diocesan Gospel Choir, and the Akwaaba Prayer Group. The Ugandan Martyrs were 24 men and boys who were murdered between 1885-87 by King Mwanga II, after they stood up for their Christian faith against the ruler. The Catholic martyrs were canonized in 1964 by Pope Paul VI. Their feast is June 3. Pope John Paul II stated that their sacrifice was the seed that “helped to draw Uganda and all of Africa to Christ.” They have been called the “founding fathers” of the church in modern Africa. The annual Mass of Remembrance for the Ugandan Martyrs is sponsored by the Black Catholic Ministry Commission of the Diocese of Camden.
Thursday, 07 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
An Vu, Andre Sulit, Kevin Dowd, Derrick Sual, Andrew Flores and Michael Laskowski stand with Deacon Richard Maxwell and St. Katharine Drexel pastor, Father John Vignone, on Sunday, June 3, after the special needs students received their first Eucharist at the Egg Harbor church. Photo by Alan M. Dumof, ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com On Sunday, June 3, St. Katharine Drexel Parish in Egg Harbor Township held a first Eucharist Mass for six special needs youth. The six youth, ranging in age from 7-13 and known as “Katie’s Kids,” after St. Katharine, spent two years preparing for the big day, being taught prayers and hymns and receiving religious instruction from teachers Patti Sharp and Keri Lucia. The first Eucharist Mass for the special needs students came about after a parent expressed the desire to have their child receive the sacrament. Margaret Hawkins, Director of Religious Education, said that on Sunday, “the parents felt that the children were very welcomed, and part of the parish.” “The children were very ecstatic,” she said. “Their family and friends all came out to support them.” The once-a-week faith formation classes will be “ongoing and continuing,” with the hope that the students will make the next steps toward confirmation, Hawkins said. Father John Vignone, pastor, celebrated the 1 p.m. Mass, and said that there will continue to be religious education classes for special needs students in the parish. Calling the day “a beautiful experience,” Father Vignone praised the youth’s “hard work” and was moved by the “excitement in the children’s faces, and the joy in their parent’s faces.” “They are a part of our parish community,” he said. The youth — Kevin Dowd, Andrew Flores, Michael Laskowski, Derrick Sual, Andre Sulit and An Vu — all received rosary beads donated from the Knights of Columbus, who escorted them into the church at the beginning of the liturgy.
Thursday, 07 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
The Catholic Star Herald will not be printed June 15, July 6, July 27, Aug. 10 or Aug. 24.
Thursday, 07 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Bishop Joseph Galante
My dear sisters and brothers, Who are we as Catholic Christians? It’s a basic question. Related to that are other questions as well: Who is welcome? And who is excluded? One way of looking at these questions is to note how some people are fond of having a bracelet emblazoned with the letters WWJD, signifying “What Would Jesus Do?” But the more accurate slogan is “What Is Jesus Doing?” What did he do as an example for us to live our understanding of what it means to be a Catholic Christian? To be a Catholic isn’t just to belong to an organization or institution. To be a Catholic is to embrace our identity with Jesus, to grow in our knowledge of what Jesus teaches and to open ourselves to the presence of the Holy Spirit who has come to us in a special way in Confirmation. We are empowered by those gifts to live our identity as Catholics and to give witness to Jesus, who invites all without exception to come to Him, to know Him and to take up His yoke because His burden is light. As we look at some of the problems and even scandals that have befallen the institutional Church, we must recognize that the Church is not just the Pope, the bishops and the clergy. The Church is all of us. We each have particular vocations within the body of Christ and each of us brings our gifts and weaknesses, our virtues and our sinfulness to these vocations. But we must recognize that we are the Body of Christ. We are the Church. At our baptism, among the wonderful things that happen to us, we become Church. I use that term ‘become Church’ and not ‘member of the Church’ because the Church teaches that we are the Church. We are the people of God, as St. Peter calls us, a kingly people, a priestly people, a people God has chosen for his own. In becoming Church at our baptism, we are grafted onto Jesus. We take on an identity with Jesus as priest, prophet, ruler and Shepherd. We become sisters and brothers of Jesus, daughters and sons of God the Father, sharing in the unique relationship that Jesus has with His Father, a sonship that is His by nature and ours by adoption through baptism. St. Paul reminds us that we are co-heirs with Jesus, that through our baptism we have died with Jesus and will be raised up with Him. To be a Catholic Christian fundamentally means to live out the transforming reality of our baptism, to continuously grow into our identity with Jesus by deepening our understanding of who He is, by strengthening our love for Him and by growing into living and loving as Jesus lives and loves. The Church is a living organism. Its strengths, growth, its vitality, depends upon all of us. At times we may be and are frustrated by some directions and decisions that our leaders may take. But the Church will be strong and vibrant because of how we, the body, live our identity and commitment to Jesus Christ. To renew the Church, we must embrace wholeheartedly and generously Jesus and His message, regularly discovering anew what He is doing in our lives. Fraternally in Christ, Bishop Joseph Galante
Thursday, 07 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Kathia Arango, coordinator of the diocese’s Hispanic Catholic Charismatic Renewal and one of the speakers at the conference, proclaims the Word of God. Philadelphia Auxiliary Bishop John J. McIntyre and Ukrainian Archbishop Stefan Soroka concelebrated the opening Mass. Catholic Charismatics from the Diocese of Camden gathered with the national charismatic community the weekend of June 1-3 in Philadelphia, to “pray with one heart together with Mary in the Upper Room,” as the conference’s theme suggested. The 2012 National Catholic Charismatic Renewal Conference took place at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, with 2,500 English, Filipino, Haitian and Hispanic Catholics in attendance. To reflect this diversity, the languages of English, Creole and Spanish were utilized in the conference. Held every five years, the weekend in June marked the 45th anniversary of the World-Wide Catholic Charismatic Renewal. The conference was organized by the National Leadership Groups of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal: the Alliance of Filipino Catholic Charismatic Prayer Communities, Association of Diocesan Liaisons to the Catholic Charismatic Renewal, the Catholic Fraternity of Charismatic Covenant Communities and Fellowships, Comité Nacional de Servicio Hispano, and Le Conseil du Renouveau Charismatique Catholique des Haitiens d’Outre-Mer. Andrés Arango, Bishop Joseph Galante’s delegate for Hispanic Ministry in the Diocese of Camden, director of Evangelization, and chairman of the National Hispanic Catholic Charismatic Renewal Service Committee, called the conference “a powerful weekend of evangelization and multiculturality.” Praising the diversity of the participants, Arango said that “it doesn’t matter if we are from different countries; we can praise God together, show our mutual love for him. The conference was a public expression of our faith.” Notable conference speakers included Michelle Moran from England, president of ICCRS (the International Council for the Catholic Charismatic Renewal); and Msgr. Joseph Malagreca, coordinator of the Charismatic Renewal in the Diocese of Brooklyn, N.Y., and spiritual director for both the Hispanic and Haitian National committees. “Our cultures are very different,” said Kathia Arango, coordinator of the Camden Diocese’s Hispanic Catholic Charismatic Renewal and one of the speakers at the conference, and the weekend was “an opportunity to show how each of our cultures prays, and worships God.”
Thursday, 21 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff, ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com Deric Rodriguez gets a hug from his aunt, Anita Colon, after graduating from Archbishop Damiano School, Westville Grove, on Tuesday, June 12. This year 13 students graduated from the school, which provides special education services to students in various school districts. “Hello. My name is Deric Rodriguez. Six years ago I was in a serious car accident.” Deric was one of 13 graduates of Archbishop Damiano School, Westville Grove, this year. All have multiple disabilities. Deric continued his commencement speech June 12 by saying his injuries left him unable to walk or talk, and affected his memory. Archbishop Damiano School is a non-sectarian, non-profit agency approved by the New Jersey Department of Education to provide special education services to students from various school districts. “Like many of my friends here at ADS, I had to work hard in my therapy sessions to achieve my goals,” he told the 200 staff and family members who had come to the school gym to celebrate the occasion with the graduates. Deric made a point of mentioning his favorite nurse, Mary, and finished his talk by saying, “As I stand here today with my friends, I know that we are ready to graduate and start a new life.” Msgr. Roger McGrath, vicar general, Diocese of Camden, gave congratulatory remarks at the graduation ceremony, and Stephen M. Sweeney, New Jersey Senate president, was the guest speaker. The graduates are Maribeth Contino, Brandon Daniel, Ryan Faris, Anna Halter, Daniel Heggan, Aisha Jackson, Thomas Messner, Stevi Niemann, Jennifer Pinto, Deric Rodriguez, Nicholas Rotz, Mark Tucker and Daniel Wood. After “Pomp and Circumstance,” they posed for photos with staff, friends and family members.
Monday, 25 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
Father William J. Bleiler, state chaplain for the Veterans of Foreign Wars, prays during a memorial service held at Wildwood Convention Center on Wednesday, June 13. Photo by Alan M. Dumoff, ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com
Monday, 25 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
1618. Flag Day
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Author:Admin2
The 14th New Jersey Regiment fires a three shot volley at the end of a Flag Day celebration June 9 in Mullica Hill. The celebration included the blessing of the Mullica River and a blessing of the flag by retired pastor Father Neal F. Dante. Photo by Alan M. Dumoff, ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com
Monday, 25 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
Raeni Blackendy reads during the Mass of Welcome for the Haitian Farmworkers celebrated on Columbia Fruit Farm in Hammonton on Friday evening, June 15. Seated at right is Msgr. Roger E. McGrath, chief celebrant;  middle photo, a worshipper and right photo, the choir. Photos by Alan M. Dumoff, ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com Benitoh Delice, Sonja Maubrun and Berteau Nazaire were traveling on a Florida interstate with a dozen other Haitian migrant farm workers on Sunday morning, June 3, when a tire blew out, causing their van to flip over several times. The three, who died at the scene, and the others were on their way to New Jersey for work during the blueberry harvest. This year’s Mass of Welcome for the Haitian Farmworkers was offered for them. It was celebrated on Columbia Fruit Farm in Hammonton on Friday evening, June 15. Msgr. Roger E. McGrath, vicar general for the Diocese of Camden, celebrated the Mass in French. The homilist, Father Edward Jeudy, a Haitian priest who serves in the Dominican Republic, spoke in Haitian Creole. The Mass was hosted by the diocese’s Black Catholic Ministry Commission and St. Monica Parish, Atlantic City. A choir of immigrant farm workers led the congregation in song. More than 700 Haitian immigrants come to Hammonton during the summer months every year for the blueberry harvest.
Monday, 25 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Deacon San Angell goes over the patient list at St. Mary’s Catholic Home, Cherry Hill with Sister Benigna in this 1978 file photo. In 1976, at the age of 69, San Angell was part of the first class of men in the Camden Diocese to be ordained as permanent deacons. By that time, Deacon Angell had already spent the better part of his life serving the local community as a lawyer and volunteer. Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Deacon Angell received his law degree from University of Buffalo in 1932, and a master’s in social work from the same institution in 1939. During World War II, spent most of his time in Europe as a field director for the American National Red Cross. He would go on to hold executive positions with the Camden County Chapter of the Red Cross, the Camden County Community Chest and Council, and the United Fund of Camden County. For many years, he was also involved with the Boy Scouts and the St. Vincent de Paul Society. In retirement he served as a permanent deacon at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Woodlynne. (He spent 22 years in Cherry Hill, before living the last 10 years of his life in Philadelphia). In his diaconate ministry, Angell visited St. Mary Catholic Home in Cherry Hill; shared his professional expertise with Catholic Social Services; and counseled people with marital problems, and problems associated with aging. He also served for a time as president of the board of directors for Senior Citizens United Community Services of Camden County. Angell once told the Catholic Star Herald that “helping people makes you feel that you’re paying rent for being on this earth.” On April 13, 1992, at the age of 83, Angell died at St. Agnes Medical Center in Philadelphia. Researched by Peter G. Sánchez and James A. McBride
Monday, 25 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report


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