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Author:Admin2
As a step into lifelong faith formation, the new St. Gabriel the Archangel Parish held its first faith festival, Lent: A Time for Prayer, Penance, and Good Works, on Sunday afternoon, March 6, at Msgr. Rocco Hall, Carneys Point. A ministry committee of 15 parishioners, guided by Father Paul Harte, pastor, worked for a month to prepare this event in anticipation of Ash Wednesday and the start of the Lenten season. A catered hot lunch was served to the nearly 200 participants by the parish’s Knights of Columbus led by Art Clemente. Afterward, the opening liturgy was filled with music provided by Joan Nipe, Jeff Shields and the parish choir. Joyce Weinrick with support of the youth group then led the younger children off to a special program in the rectory on Lent. Over the next 90 minutes, volunteer teams of presenters worked with the adults and teens using facts from Catechism, the words of Scripture, skits and various hands-on activities to help the small share ways to offer prayer and do penance and good works. Father Robert Ngageno led the closing prayer and blessing. From the success of this first festival, the committee of lifelong faith formation ministry will meet in the next few weeks to start plans for a full series of faith festivals next year.
Thursday, 10 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter Feuerherd
                        VINELAND — Celia Gutierrez, 45, stands less than five feet tall and looks at least a decade younger. Her presence is quiet, reflective, hardly imposing. Yet most every day she can be found at the South Woods State Prison in Bridgeton, a place where some of New Jersey’s most hardened convicts spend years. She’s worked there for the past 11 years as a mental health therapist, where she uses skills learned by earning a master’s degree in social work from Rutgers University in Camden. But she goes beyond her job, feeling called by God to do more, by, she says, “giving the message of salvation” to sick and dying prisoners. As a regular routine, she takes her lunchtime to sit and pray with prisoners who have no one else. She has become a presence on the wards: Even the Muslim prisoners point out who might need some Christian spiritual solace and consolation. Mindful of their sensitivities, she asks permission to pray with the patients. None has ever refused. “Once I put myself in the service of God, he doesn’t leave me alone. He has so much to do,” says Ms. Gutierrez in an interview at the John Paul II Retreat House here, where she takes classes in the diocesan Faith Formation program with fellow Spanish-speaking Catholics from throughout the Camden Diocese. The subjects, taught through the College of St. Elizabeth, range from Scripture to sacraments and pastoral ministry. The cost is subsidized by the Camden Diocese and local parishes, so that participants pay only a third of the tuition cost. Ms. Gutierrez describes the Faith Formation opportunity as a life changer. Born in Mexico, she came to New Jersey when she was 9 with her family. Ms. Gutierrez’ involvement in ministry is not new but the classes, she says, have given her a jolt of confidence and the courage to minister to prisoners who are shunned by the wider society. “I am not a big lady,” she says, but she finds that “the class has helped me to be more bold and courageous.” She feels protected in a place filled with men convicted of heinous acts. “Through the inmates, I have seen the love of God. I believe in treating the inmates with the dignity they were given by God. When they see that, they respond,” she says. Her approach in her informal volunteer ministry differs from her work. The prisoners can sense the difference. “I’m not there to do an evaluation,” she says. Instead, she offers a simple message that there is a forgiving and loving God. Within the confines of the prison, that can be startling. While her job grants her access, she holds no formal portfolio, only the care and concern of Christian witness. She credits much of her involvement to the example of her father, Miguel, a former Mexico City police officer who became one of the first Mexicans to settle in the Vineland area when he brought his wife, Rafaela (now deceased) and their seven children to the area (two more were born in New Jersey). As a pioneer among Mexicans in the area, Ms. Gutierrez learned about Latino culture largely through her Puerto Rican neighbors. Now Mexican culture — the food and music — pulsates through Vineland. She remembers her father routinely offering space for migrants moving through Vineland, and he would encourage the family to speak freely about their faith. So the faith formation classes continue what was already nurtured in her family. The classes not only are helpful for her prison ministry. As a religious education coordinator at Divine Mercy Church here, she was able to begin a program to publicly celebrate the sacrament of baptism at Sunday Mass, encouraged in church liturgical documents as a way for the wider community to welcome new members. She is thankful about the faith formation program for giving her more confidence in her work in the parish and in prison ministry. The low cost to students, and the classes in both English and Spanish, make it accessible. Her English is flawless, yet Ms. Gutierrez likes the cultural connection provided by the classes in Spanish, even if writing in her native tongue is difficult for her. She wishes more would take advantage of the opportunity. For herself, she doesn’t yet know where the Faith Formation process will take her. But she is wiling to trust. “I am willing to do what God asks of me on a daily basis,” she says. So far, she sees God’s hand in directing her to a ministry within the walls of a prison. She offers some words of quiet confidence in prayer mixed with caution: “Be careful what you ask for, because you will get it.” This is the second in an occasional series of articles on how Faith Formation is making an impact in the diocese. For more information about the diocesan Faith Formation program, call Linda Robinson at 856-583-6116.
Thursday, 10 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Adam Thomas
Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, the famed radio and television host and author, is pictured with Adam (Jim) Thomas, who served as his driver when the archbishop visited Atlantic City.     I am embarrassed to say I don’t remember the exact date. I believe it was in the 1950s and was a Marian Year. I was an ardent admirer of Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen and a diehard listener to his award-winning and top-rated television program “Life Is Worth Living.” So you may imagine when I heard he was coming to Atlantic City for a presentation at Convention Hall for thousands of visitors and dignitaries, I was engulfed with the dilemma, how can I hope to meet him, my spiritual idol on Earth? I was informed the task of escorting him as a driver down the boardwalk for a parade was assigned to fire department personnel with city convertibles. At this point I conceived a ruse, which I quickly justified by my great admiration for this man, and having convinced myself it did not fall into the realm of a serious transgression and the end justified the means, I proceeded with my plan. Having lived in Atlantic City my entire life (I am now in my 80s), I was fairly well known to the city fathers and municipal employees, including the fire department, so I borrowed a fireman’s hat and presented myself as the driver for the archbishop. Escorted by two legitimate fireman friends and their cars, I proceeded down the boardwalk and parked at Indiana Avenue and the walk to await the archbishop. He was staying at the Claridge Hotel. I can still envision his walking that long walk from the Claridge and up the ramp with the cloak and robes he wore on television billowing in the breeze. I greeted him and he looked at me and made a very complimentary personal remark to me, which I will not repeat here. As I proceeded down the boardwalk, with hundreds of people crowding the vehicle, he repeatedly asked me to stop the car so he could talk to the people. He had a unique way of making the ordinary man and woman feel good and showed a genuine interest in their work, whether the person was a plumber, a carpenter, a housewife or whatever. His gift of caring for Mr. Everyman and Mrs. Everywoman was a tribute to his humility. I noticed when a child was present, he put his hand on the child’s head and made the sign of the cross on the child’s forehead. At about this time I was muttering (I thought quietly but evidently not) and when questioned by the priest in the front seat with me as to why, I replied, “Here I am, Father, with the archbishop, and everybody is taking pictures and I, like a dope, have no camera.” How could I overlook that? We proceeded to the hall and I remained in the wings offstage and observed the archbishop’s presentation. The hall was packed with all degrees of citizens, notables and celebrities. I still recall his opening remarks. He said when he was given the television spot, it was suggested he accept a name the promoters had hoped for, instead of “Life Is Worth Living,” but he refused. He said they were then stuck with the name they had hoped for and so assigned it to a show called “Red Buttons” starring the comedian. After his presentation, while I was waiting outside his dressing room, a monsignor approached me and said the archbishop would like to see me, “it’s important.” I was perplexed as to what I may have done to warrant this request (or command). I entered the room and the archbishop was standing with his arms outstretched, in full regalia, and said, “Ah, my friend, Mr. Thomas, would you please do me a favor?” Before I could answer he said, “Would you please let me have my picture taken with you?” Evidently he had overheard me in the car murmuring as to having no camera. He then autographed a book to me titled “Go to Heaven” and then asked me, “Do you like macaroons?” I replied, “I love them.” He said, “Well, I have a Norwegian housekeeper, who makes the best macaroons. There is a brown bag over there with some inside. Come share them with me.” With hundreds of people waiting to meet him, he had time for me. He cared about some worries I confided in him and gave me his attention and time. His reaching out to the common man was indeed his imitation of Christ and I was surely fortunate to meet this great man and be the receiver of his blessing and spiritual love. I cherish his book, which has the following inscription to me, to Jim Thomas: “In token of gratitude with the blessings of yours Faithfully in Christ Fulton J. Sheen.” Adam (Jim) Thomas is a member of Our Lady Star of the Sea Parish in Atlantic City.
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Author:Admin2
The Office of Lifelong Faith Formation of the Diocese of Camden is expanding the offerings in its Lay Ministry Formation Program, which provides degree and certificate courses for parish leaders and staff members. The program will now offer college and university certificate and degree courses in 15 areas for parish leaders and staff members who serve in various pastoral ministries. The latest addition is a master of science degree program in church management conducted by the Villanova School of Business. The program will teach business skills and professional ethics to clergy and lay church leaders and managers to help them effectively serve their parishes, stated the school, which is part of Villanova University in Pennsylvania. It will consist of online education and a week on campus. The diocese and the university will sign their partnership for the program March 31. Six other new programs will begin this spring. “In spring 2009, the Diocese of Camden launched the Lay Ministry Formation Program, enabling lay men and women to pursue pastoral and theological studies through various Catholic academic institutions,” said Linda K. Robinson, director of lay ministry formation for the diocese. “Today, nearly 300 individuals are pursuing diocesan certificate and college certificate and degree programs in online and hybrid learning communities and/or in-seat at the colleges or their satellite locations within the diocese.” The program focuses on a range of pastoral ministries, including religious education/faith formation, youth and young adult ministry, adult faith formation, family life formation, Hispanic and Black Catholic ministry, social justice and liturgy. It also includes programs for lay persons involved in pastoral administration and parish business management. “While parishes have always relied on volunteers in serving the needs of their parishioners, there is the recognition that to be effective in their ministries, lay persons must be properly formed intellectually, pastorally and spiritually,” the director said. “The various lay ministry formation programs are empowering lay men and women to confidently participate in the life of the church and advance the pastoral priorities of the diocese, assisting priests and in collaboration with deacons and religious men and women.” These programs are new for spring 2011: • Catechesis-Spanish – non-credit bearing certificate/diocesan certificate – University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio • Youth ministry – non-credit bearing certificate/diocesan certificate – University of Dayton • Adult faith formation – non-credit bearing certificate – University of Dayton • Social justice – non-credit bearing certificate – University of Dayton • Foundations for leadership in ministry – non-credit bearing certificate – University of Dayton • Church ministry – non-credit bearing diocesan certificate – Church Ministry Institute of Camden • Church management – master of science degree in church management – Villanova University, Villanova, Pa. These programs continue to be offered: • Theology (pastoral theology or liturgy) – master of arts degree or graduate certificate – Georgian Court University, Lakewood, N.J. • Religious education – undergraduate certificate – College of St. Elizabeth, Morristown, N.J. • Youth and young adult ministry – undergraduate certificate – College of St. Elizabeth • Parish life ministries – undergraduate certificate – College of St. Elizabeth • Pastoral ministry to African-American Catholics – undergraduate certificate – St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Overbrook, Pa. • Catechesis – non-credit bearing certificate/diocesan certificate – University of Dayton • Undergraduate degree-completion program in liberal studies – Neumann University, Aston, Pa. • Pastoral care and counseling, spiritual direction track – master of arts degree – Neumann University • Spiritual direction – graduate certificate – Neumann University • Formation of mentor couples to prepare engaged couples for marriage – Pastoral and Matrimonial Renewal Center in parish sites Classes are held at various locations throughout the diocese and many are available online and in Spanish as well as English. The diocese has forged agreements with the participating institutions so the programs are offered at a substantial discount. Candidates who are accepted into the program pay one-third of the discounted tuition cost. Parishes and the diocese pay the remaining portion of the cost. For more information about the Lay Ministry Formation Program, call Linda K. Robinson at 856-583-6116. For more information about the Hispanic track of the program, call Kathia Gomez at 856-583-6135. More information is also available by going to www.camdendiocese.org and clicking on “Lay Ministry Formation Program.”
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, March 13 (First Sunday of Lent) St. Rita of Cascia Parish, Bellmawr www.theparishofsaintrita.org Redemptorist Parish Mission at 7 p.m. in the church (Continues each night at 7 p.m. through Thursday, March 17) Catholic Community of the Holy Spirit, Mullica Hill/Woodstown www.holyspiritweb.org Parish Mission at 7:30 p.m. each night through Wednesday, March 16 Sunday, March 13 at Woodstown; Monday, March 14 at Mullica Hill; Tuesday, March 15 (with Penance Service) at Woodstown; and Wednesday, March 16 (with Mass) at Mullica Hill Monday, March 14 St. Katharine Drexel Parish, Egg Harbor Township Weekly Parish Mission at 7 p.m. “Give Us Living Water” (Continues at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 21 and Monday, March 28) St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Camden www.stanthonycamden.org 8:30 a.m. Mass; 7-9 p.m. Adoration and Confessions (English and Spanish) St. Mary Parish, Cherry Hill www.stmarycherryhill.org 8 a.m. Mass (chapel); 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Adoration (church); 7 p.m. Benediction; 7:30 p.m. Evening of Reflection for Women presented by Sr. Marcy Springer, SSJ titled “Jesus’ Call to Women As His Disciples” (chapel) Incarnation Parish, Mantua www.incarnation-church.org Mass at 9 a.m. 5:30-7 p.m. Soup & Scriptures (on all Mondays of Lent – please contact the parish to participate) Tuesday, March 15 St. Peter Parish, Merchantville www.stpeterrcc.com 6:45 a.m. Mass (church); 9 a.m. Mass (church); Benediction 7 p.m. (church); Evening Prayer 7 p.m. (church); Confessions 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. (church); Prayer at the Cross at 7 p.m. (church and hall) Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org Mass at 9 a.m. Forty Hours Devotion begins at noon and continues until 9 a.m. on Thursday, March 17 St. Monica Parish, Atlantic City www.saintmonicaofac.com Creole Mass and Stations Please contact St. Monica Parish for additional information: 609-345-1786 Wednesday, March 16 Our Lady of Hope Parish, Blackwood www.ourladyofhopenj.org 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. Mass in chapel; 7 p.m. Evening of Reflection with Exposition, Adoration, Scripture, Song Christ Our Light Parish, Cherry Hill www.christourlight.net 7:30 p.m. (Resurrection School Cafeteria) Dealing with Loss and Disappointment presented by Fr. Kevin Anderson Our Lady of Lourdes/Queen of Peace, Glassboro and Pitman www.churchofourladyoflourdes.org 7-9 p.m. Lenten Divine Mercy Mission at Our Lady of Lourdes Church Thursday, March 17 St. Simon Stock Parish, Berlin and Pine Hill www.stsimonstock.net 8 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel 7 p.m. “Extraordinary Women of the Bible Series” in Parish Meeting Room – Our Lady of Mt. Carmel site St. Bridget - University Parish, Glassboro www.churchofstbridget.com 8 a.m. Mass 6 p.m. Lenten Mass and Soup Dinner (Continues on Thursdays through April 14 – please call ahead) Friday, March 18 Incarnation Parish, Mantua www.incarnation-church.org Mass at 9 a.m. Franciscan Mystery Players at 7 p.m. in the church Divine Mercy Parish, Vineland http://home.catholicweb.com/DivineMercyParish Morning Prayer at 7 a.m.; Masses at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Stations of the Cross in English at 7 p.m.; Stations of the Cross in Spanish at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 19 (Solemnity of St. Joseph) St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral Parish, Camden www.stjosephprocathedral.org 8:30 a.m. Mass Please contact the parish for other scheduled activities on this, its feast day Holy Trinity Parish, Margate www.trinitymargate.org Mass at 8 a.m. in St. James Church, Ventnor At 9:30 a.m., a three-mile procession commemorating the Stations of the Cross (in English, Polish and Spanish) will be made visiting the three downbeach churches beginning at St. James, Ventnor then proceeding via the beach to Blessed Sacrament, Margate and on to Epiphany, Longport. Transportation will be provided by the Knights of Columbus for those in need. Please park in Longport, carpools will be available to Ventnor. Our Lady of Lourdes/Queen of Peace, Glassboro and Pitman www.churchofourladyoflourdes.org 1:30-4:30 p.m. “God…A Woman…and the Way” A Reflection of the Seven Sorrows of Mary at Our Lady of Lourdes Church Confessions at 4 p.m. and Sunday Vigil Mass at 5 p.m. Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org 6 p.m. Messa Italiana (Italian Mass) in Honor of St. Joseph 7 p.m. Festa Italiana in the Aquin Center
Thursday, 10 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Charles W. Nutt
  Carolyn Forche, poet, professor and political activist, will give the keynote address at the annual Romero Lecture at Rutgers-Camden on Friday, March 25.     Over a small supper in the kitchen of a convent in El Salvador, Archbishop Oscar Romero told Carolyn Forche firmly that she must return to the United States right away. He wanted her to tell the American people of the terrible human rights abuses committed by the government in his country. She tried to convince him that he too should leave. He was No. l on the published hit lists for right-wing death squads. But the archbishop refused to go. Reluctantly, Forche left the next day. One week later, on March 24, 1980, Archbishop Romero was shot to death by a hired gunman while celebrating Mass late one afternoon in a small hospital chapel. Three decades later Forche, an internationally known poet and human rights activist, continues to speak out. She will give the keynote address Friday, March 25 at the 11th annual Romero Lecture, sponsored by the Romero Center of the Diocese of Camden. The theme of the day is “Images of Justice: Prophets, Poets, and the Arts.” The speech by Forche (pronounced for-SHAY) will be at 7 p.m. in the Student Center of Rutgers-Camden. “I’m going to talk about the ‘poetry of witness,’” Forche said. “And I’m going to tell the story of my own spiritual education in El Salvador, and my experience with Monsignor Romero, and how it changed my life and my work – my poetry and my work in the world – and set me on a new path.” Forche is a professor of English at Georgetown University and the director of the Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice. She won the Yale Younger Poets Prize for the first of her four books of poetry, “A Gathering of Tribes,” published in 1976. It was her second book, “The Country Between Us,” published five years later, that brought her national recognition. Poems on the plight of the poor and the oppressed in El Salvador helped focus attention on the conditions that culminated in a 12-year civil war in that Central American nation. “I never imagined that it would be a poetry book that would lead me to speak to American audiences and assemblies about oppression in El Salvador,” she said. “There is nothing that one man will not do to another,” reads the final line in her poem “The Visitor.” “This is the work of bringing the sin to the eye,” Forche explains. “This is the work of denouncing wrong and injustice.” But she adds, “We can’t turn away from this. We must find that capacity within ourselves and work on ourselves. So that is the work of denunciation. But there’s also the work of redemption and of transformation.” It is, she says, “the work of not allowing injustice to go unremarked or unchallenged. That’s what Monsignor was doing. He was not allowing it to go unchallenged. He could have been a comfortable bishop saying Mass and living in a big house with a nice car and a driver, and go to dinner with government officials.” Instead, Forche said, “He chose to denounce injustice. He chose to challenge this kind of violence. He chose to stand with the people.” Forche went to El Salvador in 1978 and spent much of the next two years there. She went at the urging of Leonel Gomez Zides, a coffee farmer and adviser to agrarian unions. Gomez was the nephew of Claribel Alegria, a Central American poet then living in Spain, whose poetry Forche had translated for publication. It was Gomez who set up the supper meeting that would turn out to be the last time Forche saw Archbishop Romero – who preferred to be known to his people as simply “Monsignor.” In her keynote speech this month, Forche said, “I’m hoping to give them just a little personal glimpse of Monsignor. I just want them to feel connected to him. I want them to understand that they are connected to him . . . that he’s not a remote saintly figure.” Forche feels that connection and in her mind still talks with the archbishop. She remains grateful for the road he showed her. “He was very human,” Forche said. He could admit to being nervous but he demonstrated that it was still possible to show great courage. “The last time I saw him,” she said, while sitting at that kitchen table in the convent, “I was struck very profoundly with the realization that I was in the presence of a saint, a living saint.” About the Romero Center The Romero Center is a Catholic urban retreat and social justice education center in East Camden. The organization is a ministry of St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral. The center is located in the building that once served as St. Joseph’s convent. The center opened on March 24, 1998, the 18th anniversary of the assassination of its namesake, Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador. Archbishop Romero was an outspoken advocate for human rights and social justice. During a period of social unrest that culminated in more than a decade of civil war in that Central American country, the archbishop was shot to death by a hired gunman while celebrating Mass. Efforts have been under way since 1990 to have Archbishop Romero declared a saint. In discussing the purpose of the Romero Center, the organization’s website (www.romero-center.org) explains: “We want young people to see that there is both opportunity and challenge in the work of the Church. We want adults to understand their role in bringing about a societal commitment to end poverty and discrimination in our world.” Urban Challenge is the center’s signature program. The purpose is to deal with issues of urban poverty, race, and social and economic justice. Activities involve a combination of volunteer service, study, reflection and prayer. The program is open to all religious denominations. Larry DiPaul, director of life and justice for the Diocese of Camden, said between 10,000 and 12,000 people have participated in the Urban Challenge program. Themes for some of the past annual Romero Lectures have been peace, the plight of the poor, the problems of undocumented residents, the death penalty and economic justice. If you go: What: 11th annual Romero Lecture, “Images of Justice: Prophets, Poets, and the Arts.” Where: The Student Center on the campus of Rutgers University in Camden. When: Friday, March 25. • 1 p.m. Dramatic presentation: “A Line in the Sand.” Personal stories of people affected by migration on the U.S./Mexican border, followed by a discussion facilitated by Dennis Fisher, program officer for education with the northeast region of Catholic Relief Services. • 3:15 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Concurrent workshops: “Expressions of Hope.” A film workshop features Dr. Linda Barratte of the College of St. Elizabeth talking about cinema and social justice and Aaron Blandon, an African-American director, musician and film maker on justice and reality reflected through film and the arts. An art workshop will be presented by Mickey McGrath, an Oblate of St. Francis de Sales, an artist, writer and speaker who explores the relationship between art and faith. A crafts workshop will feature fair trade retailer Darlene DeLaPaz of Ten Thousand Villages and Bill and Betty Baumann of the East Africa Center. • 7 p.m. Keynote address by Carolyn Forche, poet, professor and political activist. Cost: Afternoon sessions are free. Keynote admission is $10 for adults and $5 for students with group discounts available. Light refreshments will follow the lecture. For more information, call 856-964-9777.
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Bishop Joseph A. Galante has announced the appointment of Msgr. Leonard G. Scott as pastor, Emmaus Catholic Community, Mount Ephraim, effective March 28. Msgr. Scott, 71, is currently pastor of St. Aloysius Parish, Oaklyn, where he has served since July 2009. He previously served as pastor of Holy Rosary Parish, Cherry Hill, 2002-09), and St. Vincent Pallotti, Haddon Township, 2010). Msgr. Scott holds a doctorate in canon law from the Lateran University in Rome, and he served for many years in the diocesan Tribunal. He was judicial vicar of the Camden Diocese, 1979-2002. He also has served as president of the Canon Law Society of America. Before going to Rome he attended Mother of the Angels Seminary, Niagara University, N.Y. A native of Bridgeton, Msgr. Scott was ordained in Rome on Dec. 19, 1964. His first assignment was at Our Lady Star of the Sea, Atlantic City, in 1965. Msgr. Scott also has served on the Camden Commission for Family Ministry and the Presbyteral Council.
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News/Supplements
Author:Admin2
hocsupplement-web.pdf
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Front Page of Newspaper/Latest Front Page Images
Author:Admin2
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Dear Readers: 1) Do you attend Mass and/or support your parish on a regular basis? 2) Do you support the House of Charity-Bishop’s Annual Appeal? 3) Do you have children enrolled in Catholic schools and/or religious education programs? 4) Are you a school faculty member or religious education instructor? A complimentary copy of this week’s Catholic Star Herald has been mailed to every household in the diocese. However, if you fall into any of the above categories, the newspaper can be provided to you weekly on a complimentary basis by your parish. If you would like to become a regular subscriber, please call (856) 583-6142 and we will be happy to add you to our list of regular subscribers.
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Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Admin2
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Sara Raubertas, Colton and Dillon Krammer and Vincent Aglialoro blow some pretty large bubbles duing a dance sponsored by the God Is in the House Youth Group Feb. 12 at St. Anthony Parish Hall, Hammonton.
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Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Admin2
                                      Photos by Alan M. Dumoff The Father-Daughter Dance at St. Vincent de Paul School, Mays Landing, March 4
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Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
Photos by Alan M. Dumoff In boys’ high school basketball action last week, St. Augustine Prep (Richland) played host to Bishop Eustace (Pennsauken) on Thursday, March 3 in the South Jersey Non-Public A quarterfinals. The Hermits defeated the visiting Crusaders by a score of 61-58. Top left, Bishop Eustace’s William Lennon (24) hits two points over St. Augustine’s Charlie Monaghan. Two days later, on March 5, St. Augustine was victorious again, beating Christian Brothers Academy, 62-52, in the Non-Public A semifinals, to move on to the championship game against Holy Spirit. Right, St. Augustine’s Don Palmieri (20) hook shots one into the basket, despite the best efforts of Christian Brothers Academy’s Eric Shaw.
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Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
Photo by Cynthia E. Soper In a three-peat win, the Boys Varsity Gold Team of Christ the King Regional School in Haddonfield won their final game of the Camden County Catholic Grammar School League season by a score of 49-41 to take first place.
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Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
  Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Last Friday, March 4, Holy Spirit High School senior basketball player Jate Cheshul scored his 1,000th point for the school, in his team’s 49-40 Non-Public A quarterfinal victory against Camden Catholic.
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Español/Spanish/Español/Spanish
Author:Admin2
Miembros de la Comisión Para el Ministerio Hispano tuvieron su tercera reunión en la Casa de Retiro Juan Pablo II el viernes 25 de febrero. La Hna. Roseann Quinn y Linda K. Robinson estuvieron presentes durante la primera parte de la reunión para ofrecer información sobre programas de formación de fe que se ofrecen en la diócesis. La comisión aprovechó de la oportunidad primero para expresar su agradecimiento al Obispo José Galante, quién a través de la Oficina del Ministerio Laico, viene apoyando a las comunidades latinas. A la vez, miembros de la comisión también expresaron de forma personal las dificultades y preocupaciones que vienen aquejando a muchos de los hermanos y hermanas en el proceso de registraciones y pagos. Algunas sugerencias posibles fueron ofrecidas por los presentes y bien recibidas por todos. El sentirse escuchados trajo al grupo un sentido adicional de gratitud profunda.
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Columns/Growing in Faith
Author:Michael M. Canaris
People of the Book: Stephen Luke’s Acts of the Apostles, often seen as a companion volume to his Gospel proper, provides fertile ground on which to encounter various early leaders who shaped the first days of the Christian movement called at that time simply The Way. Such is undoubtedly the case with Stephen, the first disciple to die for the faith, for which reason he is called the proto-martyr. Chosen as one of the seven deacons named by the apostles to help redistribute the community’s commonly held goods to widows and orphans, Stephen was instrumental as one of the ministers or servants (Greek diakonoi) of the first generation of disciples. Despite his obvious erudition and familiarity with Jewish religious thought and self-identity, and perhaps because of his integral role in the young Christian movement, Stephen has traditionally been portrayed throughout history as youthful and ruddy-faced by artists such as Carracci, Rembrandt, Rubens and Carpaccio (the painter whose vibrant colors supposedly provided the namesake for the perhaps more famous Italian appetizer). Whether or not he was in fact young, he was certainly fearless and perhaps even brash in asserting his newfound faith. In Acts 7 and its account of his confrontational encounter with the Sanhedrin, Luke uses Stephen as a mouthpiece to summarize God’s actions throughout salvation history from Abraham through Moses and the patriarchs. It culminates with the following charge against his prosecutors: “You stiff-necked people, uncircumcised in heart and ears! You always resist the Holy Spirit; as your ancestors did, so do you. Which of the prophets did your fathers not persecute? And they killed those who foretold the coming of the Just One, of whom you now have become the betrayers and murderers. You have received the law by the direction of angels and have not kept it.” It is important to take note of what this passage intends to tell us. What it most assuredly does not indicate is that the Jewish people taken collectively are in any sense more guilty for persecuting the prophets than any human being living in any century who turns his back on God’s repeated attempts to call us to a higher standard of living. Stephen is not condemning a particular race of people for the murder of the divine Just One, or implicating them in the loaded charge of deicide which has caused so much heartache over the centuries for God’s chosen people. Pope Benedict’s second volume of “Jesus of Nazareth” comments on such a reading of the Passion, and thus sheds light on all scenes involving the Sanhedrin and the “crowds” (ochlos), presumably the same ones who clamored for the stoning of Stephen under the watchful and approving eye of Saul of Tarsus, later to be blinded by a conversion experience on the road to Damascus and take the name St. Paul: “Now we must ask: Who exactly were Jesus’ accusers? Who insisted that he be condemned to death? We must take note of the different answers that the Gospels give to this question. According to John it was simply ‘the Jews.’ But John’s use of this expression does not in any way indicate — as the modern reader might suppose — the people of Israel in general, even less is it ‘racist’ in character. After all, John himself was ethnically a Jew, as were Jesus and all his followers. The entire early Christian community was made up of Jews. In John’s Gospel this word has a precise and clearly defined meaning: he is referring to the Temple aristocracy…. When in Matthew’s account the ‘whole people’ say: ‘His blood be on us and on our children’ (27:25), the Christian will remember that Jesus’ blood speaks a different language from the blood of Abel (Heb 12:24): it does not cry out for vengeance and punishment; it brings reconciliation. It is not poured out against anyone; it is poured out for many, for all.” This is not a new “exoneration” of the Jewish people by the current pontiff as some media outlets have claimed, but rather the consistent teaching of the church. (For instance, note Nostra Aetate 4, a text nearly half a century old.) Stephen stands as a model for courageously interiorizing the message of Christ in “Spirit and truth” beyond a legalistic dead-letter approach to the law. He teaches us not blame and condemnation of any person or group, but unwavering forgiveness. Being pummeled with rocks and collapsing in a bloody heap, his final words are a prayer for his accusers who obviously despise him and his prophetic witness (Greek martys): “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit. Do not hold this sin against them.” As we know from the carol “Good King Wenceslaus,” the feast of Stephen is celebrated in the Christmas season, on Dec. 26 to be precise. Due to the manner of his demise, he was somewhat ironically held up as the patron saint of stonemasons in the Middle Ages. His name literally means “crown.” He was the first to receive the glory of the martyr’s crown, the blood of whom has traditionally been said to provide the seedbed of the church’s growth. Michael M. Canaris of Collingswood is an administrator at Fairfield University’s Center for Faith and Public Life and is on the faculty for the Department of Philosophy, Theology, and Religious Studies at Sacred Heart University.
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Columns/Spiritual Life
Author:Ronald Rolheiser
There’s a Buddhist parable that runs something like this: One day as the Buddha was sitting under a tree, a young, trim soldier walked by, looked at the Buddha, noticed his weight and his fat, and said: “You look like a pig!” The Buddha looked up calmly at the soldier and said: “And you look like God!” Taken aback by the comment, the soldier asked the Buddha: “Why do you say that I look like God?” The Buddha replied: “Well, we don’t really see what’s outside of ourselves, we see what’s inside of us and project it out. I sit under this tree all day and I think about God, so that when I look out, that’s what I see. And you, you must be thinking about other things!” There’s an axiom in philosophy that asserts that the way we perceive and judge is deeply influenced and colored by our own interiority. That’s why it’s never possible to be fully objective and that’s why five people can witness the same event, see the same thing, and have five very different versions of what happened. Thomas Aquinas expressed this in a famous axiom: Whatever is received is received according to the mode of its receiver. If this is true, and it is, then, as the Buddhist parable suggests, how we perceive others speaks volumes about what’s going on inside of us. Among other things, it indicates whether we are operating out of a blessed or a cursed consciousness. Let’s begin with the positive, a blessed consciousness: We see this in Jesus, in how he perceived and in how he judged. His was a blessed consciousness. As the gospels describe it, at his baptism, the heavens opened and God’s voice was heard to say: “This is my blessed one, in whom I take delight.” And, it seems, for the rest of his life Jesus was always in some way conscious of his Father saying that to him: “You are my blessed one!” As a consequence, he was able to look out at the world and say: “Blessed are you when you are poor, or when you are persecuted, or suffering in any way. You are always blessed, no matter your circumstance in life.” He knew his own blessedness, felt it, and, because of that, could operate out of a blessed consciousness, a consciousness that could look out and see others and the world as blessed. Sadly, for many of us, the opposite is true: We perceive others and the world not through a blessed consciousness but through a cursed consciousness. We have been cursed and because of that, in whatever subtle ways, we curse others. What’s a curse? A curse is not the colorful language that comes out of our mouths when we get stuck in traffic or when we slice our golf ball the wrong way. What we say then may be in bad taste and highly profane, but it’s not a curse. A curse is more pernicious. Cursing is what we do when we look at someone whom we don’t like and think or say: “I wish you weren't here! I hate your presence! I wish you’d go away!" Cursing is what we do when we are affronted by the joyous screams of a child and we say: “Shut up! Don't irritate me!” Cursing is what we do when we look at someone and think or say: “What an idiot! What a jerk!” Cursing is what we do whenever we look at another person judgmentally and think or say: “Who do you think you are! You think you’re an artist! You think you’ve got talent! You don’t, you’re full of yourself!” Notice in each of these examples that what is being said is the antithesis of what the Father said to Jesus at his baptism: “You are my blessed one, in you I take delight!” If any of us could play back our lives as a video we would see the countless times, especially when we were young, when we were subtly cursed, when we heard or intuited the words: Shut up! Who do you think you are! Go away! You aren’t wanted here! You’re not that important! You’re stupid! You’re full of yourself! All of these were times when our energy and enthusiasm were perceived as a threat and we were, in effect, shut down. And the residual result in us is shame, depression and a cursed consciousness. Unlike Jesus we don’t see others and the world as blessed. Instead, like the young soldier looking at an overweight Buddha under a tree, our spontaneous judgments are swift and lethal: “You look like a pig!” Whatever is received is received according to the mode of its receiver. Our harsh judgments of others say less about them than they say about us. Our negativity about others and the world speaks mostly of how bruised and wounded, ashamed and depressed, we are — and how little we ourselves have ever heard anyone say to us: “In you I take delight!” Oblate Father Ron Rolheiser is president of the Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, Texas. He can be contacted through his website www.ronrolheiser.com.
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Columns/The Catholic Difference
Author:George Weigel
Russian Federation President Dmitri Medvedev’s recent visit to the Vatican, which included an audience with Pope Benedict XVI, is being trumpeted in some quarters as further evidence of a dramatic breakthrough in relations between the Holy See and Russia, and between the Catholic Church and the Russian Orthodox Church. While I wish that were the case, several recent experiences prompt a certain skepticism. In what were called “elections” in December 2010, Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko was returned to office. Virtually all international observers regarded the “elections” as fraudulent and condemned Lukashenko’s post-election arrest and jailing of candidates who had dared oppose him. Yet shortly after the results were announced, Patriarch Kirill I, the leader of Russian Orthodoxy, sent a congratulatory message to Lukashenko, whom he praised for having “honestly served the whole country and its citizens.” “The results of the elections,” he wrote, “show the large amount of trust that the nation has for you.” Coddling autocrats is not, unfortunately, unknown in Christian history. What is new, however, is the Moscow patriarchate’s repeated claims that Russian Orthodoxy is the sole repository of the religious identity of the peoples of ancient “Rus” (Russians, Belarusians and Ukrainians) and their principal cultural guarantor today. That close identification of ethnicity and Russian Orthodoxy raises serious theological questions, even as it crudely simplifies a complex history involving multiple cultural and religious currents. More disturbing still were remarks made in Washington in February by Metropolitan Hilarion, the Moscow patriarchate’s “external affairs” officer — Russian Orthodoxy’s chief ecumenist. Hilarion is an impressive personality in many ways: He is entirely at home in English, he displays a nice sense of humor, and his curriculum vitae includes a large number of publications and musical compositions. Yet when I asked him whether the L’viv Sobor (Council) of 1946 — which forcibly reincorporated the Greek Catholic Church of Ukraine into Russian Orthodoxy, turning the Greek Catholics into the world’s largest illegal religious body — was a “theologically legitimate ecclesial act,” Hilarion unhesitatingly responded “Yes.” I then noted that serious historians describe the L’viv Sobor as an act of the Stalinist state, carried out by the NKVD (predecessor to the KGB); Hilarion responded that the “modalities” of history are always complicated. In any event, he continued, it was always legitimate for straying members of the Russian Orthodox flock (as he regarded the Ukrainian Greek Catholics) to return to their true home (i.e., Russian Orthodoxy). Throughout the meeting, Hilarion smoothly but unmistakably tried to drive a wedge between Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II (whom two patriarchs of Moscow, both KGB-connected, refused to invite to Russia). He also suggested that Benedict’s calls for a “new evangelization” in Europe, including a recovery of classic Christian morality, could be addressed by joint Catholic-Russian Orthodoxy initiatives. Yet, in what seemed a strange lack of reciprocity, Hilarion also spoke as if the entirety of the former “Soviet space” is the exclusive ecclesial turf of the Russian Orthodox patriarchate of Moscow. Some clarifications are thus in order. The Catholic-Russian Orthodox dialogue clearly needs theological recalibration. If Russian Orthodoxy’s leadership truly believes that a 1946 ecclesiastical coup conducted by the Stalinist secret police is a “theologically legitimate ecclesial act,” then there are basic questions of the nature of the Church and its relationship to state power that have to be thrashed out between Rome and Moscow. Serious theological issues are also at stake in the Moscow patriarchate’s insistence on a virtual one-to-one correspondence between ethnicity and ecclesiology, a position Rome (which does not believe that genes determine anyone’s ecclesial home) cannot share. Second, the relationship between the Russian Orthodox leadership and the efforts of the Medvedev/Putin government to reconstitute the old Stalinist empire, de facto if not de iure, has to be clarified. Patriarch Kirill’s praise of the dictator Lukashenko, like his forays into Ukrainian politics, suggests the unhappy possibility that the Russian Orthodox leadership is functioning as an arm of Russian state power, as it did from 1943 until 1991. If that is not the case, it would be helpful if Patriarch Kirill and Metropolitan Hilarion would make that clear, in word and in deed. George Weigel is Distinguished Senior Fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, D.C.
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Letters to the Editor/Latest Letters to the Editor
Author:Nina Giacona
Editor: I agree with and appreciate what many people said in Charles Nutt’s article regarding social activities and the fact that they strengthen fellowship and community in the life of a parish and its people (“Social activities used to pull together parishioners,” Feb. 25). Obviously, there is good in every fashion show, Irish variety show, and beef n’ beer where all are welcome. However, the importance of the spiritual offerings of a parish cannot possibly be overestimated, as that is where the faithful are fed. What we have been hearing for several years now is that we need to build “vibrant” and “dynamic” parishes. The Eucharist and its availability to the people is the core of our vitality and dynamism, both personally and parochially. Since the sacrifice of the Mass is the most fitting worship of God, perhaps each deanery could review the daily Mass schedules of their parishes and agree to stagger the times so that more of the faithful can attend and participate in this highest form of prayer during the work week? A schedule for Eucharistic Adoration at each parish could also be reviewed, considering its countless benefits. (I am fortunate enough to live where a neighboring parish offers Perpetual Adoration.) A monthly Mass that is offered in the evening (in the place of that day’s morning Mass) could honor the patron saint of a parish and include the participation of families. It is the spiritual life of a parish that sustains it and gives it purpose. It is where all its fruits are born. Nina Giacona Northfield
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Letters to the Editor/Latest Letters to the Editor
Author:Ian McCrane
I read with great interest the article about the Opportunity Scholarship Act (OSA). As a product of Catholic schools myself I have always felt a great sense of appreciation and debt to the priests, nuns and lay teachers who dedicated themselves to my education. One aspect of the OSA should give even its most ardent supporters pause, however. Nowhere in the article was there any mention of what influences the state would expect to exert on curriculum. Whenever there is outside money involved there is bound to be some degree of influence expected and eventually asserted. We should carefully consider that these funds will be administrated by entities that may be apathetical about or even hostile to the concept of Catholic schools maintaining their strong Catholic identity. We must never allow our parochial schools to become what so many of our colleges and universities have already become, “Catholic in name only.” What, for example, will the diocese do should the Department of Education mandate that any school receiving funds must teach the “responsible” use of contraception or that they must teach the equality of same-sex unions with marriage? Higher Catholic school enrollment is good but at what price? It would be an unimaginable travesty if after Catholic schools set out to change the world, we found instead that the world changed them. Ian McCrane Mantua
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Front Page of Newspaper/Latest Front Page Images
Author:Admin2
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Photo by Robert Newkirk Father Michael J. Field of Notre Dame de la Mer Parish, Wildwood, stands next to Corky O’Brien at the North Wildwood St. Patrick’s Day Parade March 12.
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
The Office of Safe Environment for Children, Youth and Adults is announcing CAP (Child Assault Prevention) sessions. CAP is the safe environment training program for adults who have regular contact with minors. Attendance is required in order to comply with the USCCB’s Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People. The policy of the diocese is that adults will attend CAP once every five years. CAP 1 teaches attendees to recognize child abuse and neglect and how to report to the proper authorities. Adults are taught that children have the right to be safe, strong and free. CAP 1 is for new volunteers and employees. CAP 2 is No More Bullies, No More Victims and is a workshop on bullying awareness and bullying prevention. Cyberbullying is also addressed. Both sessions are 90 minutes. Adults must attend CAP 1 before attending CAP 2. After five years, adults have the option of attending CAP 1 again if they prefer. The following sessions will be offered in April: CAP Phase 1 — Wednesday, April 6, 7 p.m., St. Brendan the Navigator, Avalon — Monday, April 11, 7 p.m., Christ the Redeemer, Atco, Parish Hall — Thursday, April 14, 7 p.m., Holy Eucharist, Cherry Hill CAP Phase 2 – Bullying Prevention — Thursday, April 7, 7 p.m., St. Charles Borromeo, Sicklerville, Parish Hall — Wednesday, April 13, 7 p.m., St. Frances Cabrini, Ocean City — Friday, April 15, 2 p.m., Our Lady of Mercy Academy, Newfield — Monday, April 18, 7 p.m., Christ the King, Haddonfield, Lower Level of Church To attend one of these classes, please call the CAP registration line in the Office of Safe Environment for Children, Youth and Adults at (856) 583-6165 or email ddiggons@camdendiocese.org to register. Please register at least five days before the session you would like to attend. The CAP schedule, location phone numbers and directions may be found on the diocesan website at www.camdendiocese.org In case of inclement weather please call the location of the CAP session you are attending.
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Michael M. Canaris, a Catholic Star Herald columnist and university teacher and administrator, will present a Lenten lecture on April 4 in his hometown of Collingswood. Canaris will speak on “Being Holy and Wholly: Lenten Reflections on Suffering” at 7 p.m. at Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish in Collingswood. The lecture will take place in McLaughlin Hall, Lees and Atlantic avenues. A goodwill offering will be taken at the event. Canaris writes a weekly column called People of the Book. He is an administrator for Fairfield University’s Center for Faith and Public Life and is on the faculty for the Department of Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies at Sacred Heart University. He wrote his dissertation at Fordham University under the direction of Cardinal Avery Dulles. For more information about the lecture, call Pat Lipperini at 856-858-4737.
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News/Latest News
Author:Craig and Judy Bickel
“He just walked out during our first big fight. We were still newlyweds. I was devastated.” Adam and Helena Cerquoni were in their mid-50s when they married; both had been married before and had children with their former spouses. During their courtship some troubling issues came to the surface, but they were “so much in love, they just knew it would all work out.” Besides, they were both devout Christians and figured God would help them once they had taken their vows. But once married, they found themselves unable to resolve their differences because they had no way to talk about the difficult issues without arguing. Helena learned to simply not bring them up, until the day came when she couldn’t hold it in anymore. What are some of the issues for couples who have been married before? Finances, moving into a new house, different styles of parenting, feeling threatened by the spouse’s relationship with the former husband or wife. After Adam came back, Helena suggested seeing a marriage counselor, but Adam wouldn’t hear of it. He got angry because he didn’t believe in confiding in counselors and figured they could work things out on their own. But things just kept deteriorating and finally, three years into the marriage, Helena was miserable enough to know things could not go on as they were. “I was ready to move out,” she says. “Adam still believed our marriage was doing OK, but I knew, unless things changed, I was done.” She begged Adam to go with her to a program called Retrouvaille, and he reluctantly agreed. Retrouvaille is a French word meaning “rediscovery.” It’s an international program designed to heal troubled marriages. It was founded in the 1970s in Canada and is credited with saving tens of thousands of marriages worldwide. Retrouvaille is based upon Catholic/Christian principles but is open to all married couples regardless of religious beliefs. The program consists of a weekend experience and various presentations in the weeks that follow. Retrouvaille is presented by married couples who themselves have experienced disillusionment, pain, anger and conflict. They offer hope as they share their personal stories of struggle, reconciliation and healing. A priest participates in the weekend, although it is not a spiritual retreat, nor is it a sensitivity group, seminar or counseling. It offers a different message from the current secular themes of self-gratification and self-reliance. The weekend helps couples discover how listening, forgiveness, communication and the dialogue process are powerful aids for building a loving and lasting relationship. Those who have attended Retrouvaille say it is no-nonsense, pulls no punches and focuses upon honest and direct communication between spouses. So how are things for Helena and Adam now? Adam is glad Helena “roped him into it.” “We are not unique in our struggles,” he says. “Everyone has differences, but they can be worked out.” They have learned how to communicate in a new way that helps them to better understand each other. He says Retrouvaille “gives you a road map that helps you think before you speak and be more Christ-like to your spouse.” Helena sees the tools taught by Retrouvaille as a way to diffuse issues before they become too serious. For her, communicating means listening to the other on a deeper level of understanding. Occasionally, she even finds that due to poor communication, they have been arguing over things they actually agree upon. The Retrouvaille process helps them to recognize this. Slowly they have experienced good changes in the way they relate to one another and in November, they will celebrate eight years of marriage. The story of Adam and Helena is but one of tens of thousands of marriages that credit Retrouvaille with putting them on the road to healing and a fulfilling relationship in marriages that may have otherwise ended in divorce. The next Retrouvaille weekend will be held from April 8 to 10 at the Malvern Retreat House in Pennsylvania. For more information about the program, call 215-766-3944 or 800-470-2230 or visit www.HelpOurMarriage.com
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Anthony Joseph “A.J.” Valle, 41, who worked in the Diocese of Camden since 1983, died suddenly on Sunday, March 6, at his home in New Castle, Del. Steve Traenkner, a friend of Valle’s since 2001, worked with him for seven years at the St. Pius X Spiritual Life Center in Blackwood, and remembered “a quiet, good friend who was always working. He taught me a lot.” Maria Nieves, security guard at the Camden Diocese’s Pastoral Center in Camden, recalled a “wonderful, kind person. He would always help when someone needed him. He never said no.” In 2008, Mr. Valle was honored for his 25 years of service to St. Pius X, where he started working when he was 14. In June 2010, he became facilities manager at the Pastoral Center, a position he held until his death. “A.J. was always available, with a ready smile, to help in any and all situations,” said Sister Roseann Quinn, of the St. Pius X Spiritual Life Center. “Nothing was too much, or too small for him.” Mr. Valle is survived by his wife, Sherri Lynn (nee Shahadi); his parents, Anthony and Claire Valle (nee Picknally); his sisters, MaryElizabeth Valle (Dan Amabile) and Barbara (Daniel) Hauber; his brothers, Michael and Daniel Valle; his nieces, Jessica and Grace; and his nephew, D.J. A funeral Mass was celebrated on Saturday, March 12, by Bishop Joseph A. Galante, at St. Pius X Retreat House in Blackwood. Interment was at St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Blackwood.
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News/Latest News
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
On March 31, a signing ceremony will take place in the Camden Diocesan Center to formalize the partnership between the Diocese of Camden’s Office of Lifelong Faith Formation and the Villanova School of Business in providing a church management degree program for parish leaders and managers. The 30-credit master of science degree in church management, part of the diocese’s Lay Ministry Formation Program, will teach business skills and professional ethics to pastors, parish business managers, diocesan department heads, and those managing church-related social service ministries. Bishop Joseph A. Galante of Camden called the upcoming partnership “a very exciting time for us in the Diocese of Camden as we form the partnership with Villanova University. This master’s degree in church administration will be of inestimable benefit to laity and clergy as they serve our parishes and institutions.” Calling the program a “faith-focused business curriculum,” Charles Zech, director of the Center for the Study of Church Management at the Villanova School of Business, noted that the program is “uniquely positioned to provide the very best in faith-based managerial education, enabling church leaders to apply sound business approaches” to pastoral issues and decision making. Courses include “Civil Law and Church Law for Church Administrators,” “Stewardship and Development,” “Human Resource Management in a Ministry Setting,” and “Pastoral Strategic Planning.” Applications are being accepted for the May cohort. All courses are offered online and can be completed in two years of part-time study. The only travel requirement is a one-week residency at the Villanova School of Business, which is part of Villanova University in Pennsylvania. Candidates accepted into the program pay one-third of the discounted tuition cost; parishes and the diocese pay the remaining cost of tuition. The upcoming partnership with the Villanova School of Business is the lastest addition to the offerings of the diocese’s Lay Ministry Formation Program. Lay Ministry Formation has partnered with numerous institutions of higher learning to offer college and university certificate and degree courses in 15 areas for parish leaders and staff members who serve in various pastoral ministries. For more information about this program and other Lay Ministry Formation programs, call Linda K. Robinson at 856-583-6116, or go to www.camdendiocese.org and click on “Lay Ministry Formation Program.”
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Bishop Joseph A. Galante has appointed Jennifer Dyer as the assistant director of Catholic Charities for the Diocese of Camden. Dyer joined Catholic Charities in 2002 as the program director for Disaster Relief and Special Services where she provided financial and administrative oversight to the September 11th fund and coordinated Project ONE, the diocesan-wide social action initiative to respond to the needs of the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita before becoming the director for the Division of Parish and Community Ministries for Catholic Charities in 2007. Throughout her time at Catholic Charities, Dyer has provided assistance to both Catholic Charities USA and Catholic Relief Services as a loaned professional for short-term projects. Prior to joining the Diocese of Camden, Dyer served as the donor relations coordinator for Catholic Near East Welfare Association in New York and as an analyst for Catholic Relief Services in Baltimore. She earned a master’s degree in public administration from Rutgers University and a bachelor’s degree from Towson University in Maryland.
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Msgr. Edward Joseph Kennedy, a priest for more than 50 years who was one of the first priests in the Diocese of Camden to begin missionary work in Brazil, died March 13 at the age of 87. Born in Jenkintown, Pa., on Aug. 19, 1923, Msgr. Kennedy studied accounting at the University of Pennsylvania before going on to seminary studies at Christ the King, St. Bonaventure, N.Y..; and St. Philip Neri, Boston, Mass. He was ordained on May 23, 1959, in Camden by Bishop Justin J. McCarthy. His first assignment was parochial vicar at St. Michael’s Parish in Gibbstown (1959-61). Msgr. Kennedy served as pastor of St. Anthony, Waterford (1967-71); St. Stephen, Pennsauken (1971-75); and Transfiguration, West Collingswood (1975-92). His other parish assignments included St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral, Camden (parochial vicar, 1965); and St. Margaret, Woodbury Heights (senior priest, 1992-93). In December 1961, at the age of 38, Msgr. (then Father) Kennedy went to work in Brazil alongside Msgr. (then Father) Felix M. O’Neill, serving the Diocese of Jatai in the Brazilian state of Goias, while taking lessons in Portuguese. He was pastor of three parishes in Brazil: Santa Helena and San Jose in Gioania, and Cure d’Ars in the capital city of Brasilia. He continued his missionary work until 1965. Msgr. Kennedy was active as a member of the Priests’ Council, the Diocesan Liturgical Commission and Priests’ Personnel Board; as chairman of the Clergy Personnel Board; as diocesan moderator of PTA; and as the Presbyteral Council retired priests representative . Msgr. Kennedy retired in 1993. Msgr. (then Father) Eugene Kernan, who met Msgr. Kennedy in 1949 when the latter was a bartender in Brigantine before joining the seminary, remembered Msgr. Kennedy as a “good, good man” who “worked hard for the people. He took care of them, and they liked him.” “Msgr. Kennedy was a dedicated priest, very conscientious, who was precise at getting things done right,” recalled Father Alfred Hewett, who befriended Msgr. Kennedy while the two were in Christ the King seminary. After Msgr. Kennedy left the Brazilian missions in 1965, Father Hewett picked up where his friend left off, traveling to Brazil in 1966 to serve. A decade ago, the two went back to Brazil, to see the continuity of their work. A viewing for Msgr. Kennedy will take place at Transfiguration Church, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood on March 18 from 3-6:30 p.m. A Mass of Jesus Christ the High Priest will follow at 7 p.m. The viewing will continue on March 19 from 9-10:30 a.m. at Transfiguration. A Mass of Christian Burial will follow at 10:30 a.m. Burial will take place at Calvary Cemetery, Cherry Hill.
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
On Sunday, March 13, 204 catechumens and candidates in the Camden Diocese participated in the Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion, a step to entering into full communion with the Catholic Church. Bishop Joseph A. Galante presided at the two ceremonies at Our Lady of Hope Parish, Blackwood, bringing together catechumens and candidates from Gloucester and Camden counties, and St. Gianna Beretta Molla Parish in Northfield, joining those from Salem, Cumberland, Atlantic and Cape May counties. The Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion are part of the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) for individuals wishing to become Christians in the Catholic tradition. The 109 catechumens, those unbaptized individuals seeking membership in the Catholic Church and the reception of the sacraments of initiation (Baptism, Holy Eucharist and Confirmation) were the first to be called up for the Rite of Election by Bishop Galante. Called by name, one by one, the catechumens stood and faced the bishop, who first asked the deacon presenter and the catechumens’ godparents, sponsors and catechists if the catechumens have “faithfully listened to God’s word…begun to walk in his presence…(and) shared the company of their Christian brothers and sisters,” to which the deacon presenter and sponsors answered in the affirmative. The congregation, as well, affirmed their willingness to support the catechumens in their journey to the Catholic faith. Afterward, each religious education director from a catechumen’s parish presented Bishop Galante with their parish’s Book of the Elect, signed by all the candidates and catechumens, affirming their commitment to Catholic discipleship. Next came the Call to Continuing Conversion, where the 95 candidates who were baptized in another Christian faith and are now seeking to enter the Catholic Church, were affirmed by their sponsors, family and the congregation. As the catechumens did, the candidates affirmed their readiness to receive the sacraments of Holy Eucharist and Confirmation. In a little more than five weeks from now, the catechumens and candidates will complete their journey to become members of the Catholic faith and receive the sacraments at the Easter Vigil.
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This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, March 20 (Second Sunday of Lent)   St. Anthony of Padua, Camden www.stanthonycamden.org 8 a.m. Mass (English); 9:30 a.m. Mass (Spanish); and 12:10 p.m. Mass (English); 6 to 8 p.m. Charismatic Prayer and Music Meeting, “Walking With Jesus” in the church basement St. Andrew the Apostle, Gibbsboro www.standrewsrc.com Parish Mission: “The Presence of God” conducted by Msgr. Louis Marucci 7 p.m. in the church (continues through Tuesday) Monday, March 21 St. John Neumann Parish, North Cape May Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament at St. Raymond’s Church, Villas 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. St. Peter Parish, Merchantville www.stpeterrcc.org Parish Mission 7 p.m. in the church (continues through Thursday) St. Katharine Drexel Parish, Egg Harbor Township Weekly Parish Mission at 7 p.m. “Give Us Living Water” Tuesday, March 22 St. Mary Parish, Cherry Hill www.stmarycherryhill.org Evening of Reflection for Men: “The King's Men” presented by Msgr. Michael Mannion, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 23 Christ Our Light Parish, Cherry Hill www.christourlight.net 8 a.m. Mass; 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament; 9 to 10:30 a.m. “Your Sorrow Is My Sorrow” presented by Sr. Peggy Devlin, OP; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Holy Hour in church; 1 p.m. Benediction; 7:30 p.m. Male Spirituality Prayer Group in the Parish Ministry Center Thursday, March 24 St. Rose of Lima Parish, Haddon Heights www.strosenj.com Masses at 6:30 a.m. (chapel); 8:30 a.m. (chapel); and 7:30 p.m. (church) Morning Prayer 8 a.m. (chapel) Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. (church) Confessions 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. (chapel) Benediction 7 p.m. (church) St. Mary of Mt. Carmel Parish, Hammonton www.stmarymtcarmelhammonton.parishesonline.com Masses at 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. at St. Joseph Church Healing Prayer Service 7 p.m. at St. Anthony Church Friday, March 25 (Solemnity of the Annunciation) St. Charles Borromeo Parish, Washington Township www.saint-charles-borromeo.org Mass 9 AM Franciscan Mystery Players 7:30 PM in the church St. Rita of Cascia Parish, Bellmawr www.theparishofsaintrita.org Franciscan Mystery Players 7:30 PM in the church Saturday, March 26 Holy Child Parish, Runnemede www.holychildparish.net Morning Mass 8:30 a.m. at St. Teresa Church Vigil Mass 4 p.m. at St. Maria Goretti Church Vigil Mass 4:15 p.m. at St. Teresa Church Or visit your local parish
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Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Admin2
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Father Edward Namiotka, president of Sacred Heart High School in Vineland, offers the opening prayer at a meeting of alumni in February to discuss the formation of the St. Joseph Society of Sacred Heart High School.   Sacred Heart High School in Vineland will hold an evening of prayer and fellowship to mark the establishment of the St. Joseph Society of Sacred Heart High School this Saturday, March 19, the Feast of St. Joseph. The society was created to provide, protect and continue to build the legacy of the school for generations to come. The society consists of alumni, parents and grandparents of both alumni and current students; business leaders and community members; as well as the current and former staff, faculty and administration. Its goal is to create an endowment fund that can be used not just to provide for the physical improvement of the school, but to sustain the educational mission and spiritual integrity of the school, and to insure the school continues its 85-year tradition of providing quality Catholic education to students. In addition, the school hopes the society will provide a critically needed financial base that will enable tuition assistance, offset the operational costs of Sacred Heart’s academic, artistic and athletic programs, and allow the school to improve its physical, intellectual and spiritual learning environment. The March 19 celebration will begin with Mass in Sacred Heart Church at 4:30 p.m. A cocktail reception will follow at 5:30 p.m. in the Jim Mogan Auditorium. Guests of honor will include Msgr. Joseph Stoerlein and members of the Sisters of St. Joseph who taught at Sacred Heart High School. The gathering will conclude at 7 p.m. with a brief presentation about the future of Sacred Heart High School and the induction of the charter members of the St. Joseph Society of Sacred Heart High School.
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Sports/Sports News
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff   On March 12, the St. Augustine Prep boys’ basketball team of Richland captured the state Non-Public A title against Seton Hall Prep, winning by a score of 71-60. The victory gave St. Augustine coach Paul Rodio his fourth state title, and his and the team’s first since 2004. Above, St. Augustine’s Austin Johnson (55) has his shot blocked by Seton Hall’s Dallas Anglin.  
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Photos by Alan M. Dumoff On March 9, the Sacred Heart (Vineland) girls’ basketball team fell to St. Rose 53-43 in a Non-Public South B girls’ basketball semifinal. Pictured is Sacred Heart’s Ally Ferrucci scoring over St. Rose’s Kasey Chambers.
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Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Gloucester Catholic lost to Cardinal McCarrick on March 9 in the Non-Public South B final. Pictured is Gloucester Catholic’s Steve Mainard driving past William Thomas for 2 points.
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Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Two nights before their loss in the finals, Gloucester Catholic beat St. Rose 50-40 in a Non-Public South B semifinal. Pictured is Kevin Caino getting 2 hard-earned points for the victorious Rams.
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
  Father David J. Klein, top left, chancellor, Diocese of Camden, distributes ashes in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Camden, on Ash Wednesday.  Right, Father Robert Nolan distributes Communion during Ash Wednesday liturgy at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School, Pennsauken.
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Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Admin2
Students of St. Anthony of Padua School, Camden, show their ashes received last Wednesday
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News/Supplements
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highereducationsupp-web.pdf
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The Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra will perform their annual Easter concert on Palm Sunday. The 60-voice chorus, symphonic orchestra and cast of actors will present “O Divine Redeemer” at 3 p.m. April 17 in the Paul VI High School Auditorium, 901 Hopkins Road, Haddon Township. The concert will feature Lenten and Easter music and present the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ in a dramatic and musical way. Tickets are $15, $25 and $30. Group rates for 25 or more are available. For tickets, call the JDCO box office at 856-858-0693 or visit www.jdco.org.
Thursday, 24 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Front Page of Newspaper/Latest Front Page Images
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
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Author:Admin2
CAMDEN — The Spirituality at Work team, along with the Pastoral Care and Wholistic Nursing departments at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center invites the community to a concert and workshop called “Harp to Heart.” The event will take place Wednesday, April 6, from 5 -7 p.m., at the Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center Chapel, located at 1600 Haddon Ave., in Camden. The concert and workshop will be led by Madeleine Doherty, a professional harpist, singer and composer from Ireland. Doherty tours extensively throughout Europe and U.S., playing both classical and Celtic harp. She recently launched a project called “Harps for Healing” in Ireland, bringing harpists to play in hospitals and care centers. Doherty has released five albums of original music including Inner Music, a triple CD of more than three hours of pure harp music, conceived in meditation to aid relaxation and self-healing. For her own health and relaxation, Doherty practices meditation, yoga and tai chi. For more information on the event, call 1-888-LOURDES, or for more information on harpist Madeleine Doherty, visit her website at www.madelelinedoherty.ie.
Thursday, 24 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
NBC10 News anchor and consumer reporter Tracy Davidson will be the guest speaker at the Mother/Daughter/Friend Breakfast on April 3 at St. Padre Pio Parish in Vineland. The St. Padre Pio Parish Altar Rosary Society will hold the breakfast at 10 a.m. in Rosary Hall, 4680 Dante Ave., Vineland, following the 9 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Pompeii Church in the parish. At NBC10, Davidson anchors the 5 p.m. weekday news, provides daily consumer reports, participates in the ConsumerWatch Facebook page, and hosts community events to help people manage their money, careers and personal information. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast journalist joined NBC10 in 1996, after spending nearly 10 years anchoring and reporting for WTVH in Syracuse, N.Y., and five years before that working for several New York radio stations. She is a member of St. Matthias Catholic Church in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., where she serves as an extraordinary minister. She recently completed a religious studies certificate at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood, Pa., and is working toward a degree in pastoral counseling. She serves on the March of Dimes Board of Directors and has served on the boards of several other community organizations. Davidson’s work in the community is an important part of why the Altar Rosary Society invited her to speak at the breakfast, said Ann Derr, the chairwoman of the committee organizing the gathering. “She does a lot of good for people,” Derr said. “Her faith has inspired her to be the person she is today and has inspired her to help other people.” The cost to attend the breakfast is $8 per person. All women are welcome. For reservations, call 856-691-7526.
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Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Members of Our Lady of Peace Cub Pack 161 Williamstown, have their heads shaved in the Collingswood Grand Ballroom on Sunday, March 20 in a fundraising effort for St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a charity that supports childhood cancer patients and raises funds for cancer research. Seven Scouts, seven Scout leaders and nine parents participated, raising $10,400.       Reed Schill, 8, got the ball rolling, or, to be more accurate, the razors buzzing. For the third year Reed, of Our Lady of Peace Cub Pack 161 Williamstown, was planning to have his head shaved for the St Baldrick’s Foundation. In other words, he is a “shavee.” St. Baldrick’s shavees shave their head in solidarity with kids fighting cancer while raising money from friends and family. Reed has been participating in honor of another scout family whose son was diagnosed with lukemia at 16 months. At a recent monthly Cub Scout meeting Mark Diienno, Cubmaster, acknowledged Reed’s efforts. “At that moment a man yelled out if I were to join Reed, he would shave his head also,” said Diienno. “Another man jumped up — Mike Mosco — and offered a $50 donation for anyone who would join Reed in his cause. Then he upped it to $100 then $200, and at that 22 men, women and children stood up and joined Reed and me in the middle of the gym floor,” he said. Diienno said the group raised $10,400 in 15 days. A dozen barbers donated their time. The two female shavees, and a woman with waist-length hair who got a short haircut, donated their hair to Locks of Love, an organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children suffering from long-term medical hair loss from any diagnosis.
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Author:Admin2
A South Jersey theater company will stage what it promises will be a modern, edgy interpretation of the musical “Godspell.” The Blackwood-based Mainstage Center for the Arts will set the hit Broadway and off-Broadway musical based on the Gospel of St. Matthew in a contemporary neighborhood where Jesus renovates an abandoned house for use as a community shelter of love, peace and forgiveness, the theater company says. “This idea to have Jesus come in modern times and fix up a shelter with support of the community is based on what I’ve seen happening across South Jersey during the rough economy of the last few years,” says Renee Chambers Liciaga, the director and choreographer of the production. “I’ve seen communities pull together to support local families in need. I’ve seen the power of school community care programs raising money or dropping off meals for those hurting. ‘Godspell’ is all about that sense of community and about teaching how to share and how to love.” Chambers Liciaga says she finds it fitting the cast members take part in the mission of sharing that is such a big part of the show. Among them is John Comegno, a religious education instructor for adults preparing to become members of the Catholic Church, who plays Jesus. “You know, we are only here for a limited time and my feeling is that we need to take advantage of that time to make an impact. My faith guides me in life,” says Comegno. “How I will play Jesus is based upon the church’s theology.” “Godspell” features a score by Stephen Schwartz that includes the hit songs “Day By Day,” “All Good Gifts” and “Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord.” The Mainstage Center for the Arts will perform “Godspell” at 8 p.m. April 1 and 2 in the Dennis Flyer Theatre in Lincoln Hall at Camden County College in Blackwood. Tickets are $16 or $21 for adults and $13 for senior citizens and students. To purchase tickets, visit www.mainstage.org or call 856-227-3091.
Thursday, 24 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Rich Luongo
Photo by James A. McBride Father George Seiter, pastor, stands with Peggy and Tony Messina, who worked to make the merger of Holy Rosary and St. Pius X parishes into Holy Eucharist Parish, Cherry Hill, go smoothly.         CHERRY HILL — The Holy Eucharist Parish is quickly finding its new identity after the merger of Holy Rosary and St. Pius X parishes on Dec. 23, 2009. “Administratively, the merger was easy,” said Peggy Messina, a former trustee with St. Pius X. Her husband, Tony, was a core team member and part of the deanery planning team. “Holy Rosary had lost its school, and membership in the church was dwindling; merger between the two parishes seemed to be a natural process.” Tony pointed out that this stewardship process had gone well. “There was a lot of similarity in the makeup of the people of the two parishes,” he said. “And things seem to be settling down now. Stewardship, for example, includes compromises as to when the Masses should be celebrated.” “For instance,” Tony said, “Pius had an 8 a.m. Mass and Holy Rosary had an 8:30 a.m. Mass. So we split the difference and made an 8:15 Mass. We split the difference for all the Masses. And Holy Rosary had a beautiful piano that the parishioners loved. So we brought it to Holy Eucharist.” Tony and Peggy are Eucharistic ministers and Tony served as a lector. Both have encouraged Eucharistic ministers and lectors from Holy Rosary and Pius X to continue their ministries in the new parish. Those who have said yes to the offer, Tony explained, were put on the schedule. He noted that the Pius X church building is the new worship site for the parish. “We went out of our way to make the Holy Rosary people feel at home,” Tony explained. “People from both parishes were made to feel welcome. We have had people from other parishes come to worship at Holy Eucharist,” Tony added. Father George Seiter, former pastor at St. Aloysius in Oaklyn and pastor of St. Pius X and Holy Rosary before being named head of the new parish, celebrates Mass at Holy Eucharist along with senior priest Father Michael Coffey. “Father Timothy Byerley is in residence,” Tony stated, “and travels quite a bit but when he’s in he will often do one of the three Sunday Masses. Father Bob Smith, retired and living at St. Mary’s, will also do a Sunday Mass on occasion.” Tony got involved with the planning committee for the merger after Father Seiter asked him. “I chose Tony to be a team member two years ago,” the pastor said. “Tony put his whole heart and soul in it. He and Peggy are great people to work with. They go beyond what’s asked of them.” Father Seiter said Tony put a lot of insight and expertise into his work on the committee. After the merger, Tony continued on the parish council, where he had been for six years, and Peggy is the rectory cook for the priests and staff. “I do their food shopping and make their dinners and occasionally lunch and also cook for special events,” she said. “They get their own breakfasts, though.” Peggy noted that the staff members get along well together. “I’ve never seen a group of women who get along so well with the priests,” she said. “And we were very fortunate with the merger to keep most of those who had been employed at the two parishes.” Peggy said that as far as the custodians were concerned, “we needed two and kept two,” she said. “One retired so we had to replace him.” “Our religious education director is Dee Oterstein,” Peggy said. “Dee worked at Holy Rosary as the assistant to the previous director. She helped make a smooth transition with the combining of our religious education classes.” For more information on stewardship contact Deacon Russell Davis, Office of Stewardship, at 856-583-6102.
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Photo by Peter G. Sánchez JustFaith participants take part in an “Off the Market” exercise, figuring out the cost of groceries in Mexico, during a session of “Crossing Borders: Migration, Theology, and the Human Journey” on March 3 at Holy Eucharist Parish in Cherry Hill.     CHERRY HILL — For eight weeks, a group of 18 men and women met Thursdays in classroom 103 in the Holy Eucharist Parish Center here, examining and reflecting through prayer, readings and discussions on the plight of migrants in the United States and those wishing to come to the United States. Their ultimate goal is to work for comprehensive immigration reform that is in line with Catholic social teaching. The eight-week session was part of the JustFaith module “Crossing Borders: Migration, Theology, And The Human Journey,” which focused on contemporary immigration debate and public policy; the history of the migration; the plight of migrants, and their struggle to find a better life in the United States; and Catholic social teaching on immigration. In the second-to-last session, “The Face of the Migrant,” participants viewed the documentary “Dying to Live: A Migrant’s Journey,” which tells of the journey individuals take from Mexico to Arizona in search of a better life in America. Leaving their spouses and children behind, men will walk across the brutal stretch from Mexico to Arizona called “the devil’s highway,” where daytime temperatures soar to 100-plus in the desert, the nights are freezing, and there is constant fear of being caught by the U.S. Border Patrol, or being ambushed by robbers. The film, directed by Bill Groody, seeks to show the human face of these poverty-stricken and socially marginalized people. It also introduces the viewer to some of those, on both sides of the border, who are trying to provide for the migrants’ physical and spiritual needs. Given the Christian imperative to protect the vulnerable and assist the downtrodden, a number of speakers argue that the problem of migration cannot be approached merely as a political or social phenomenon, but must be understood, first of all, as a moral challenge. The group also took part in an exercise called “Off the Market,” where they realized just how little money a typical Mexican family makes. After non-negotiable expenses such as medical visits, rent or house payments, water, gas, electricity, transportation to/from work, school tuition/uniforms for children, there is little left for items which are common in American households, such as laundry detergent, cooking oil, toilet paper and tea. After a presentation last year on immigration at Holy Eucharist, parish leaders reached out to Larry DiPaul, director of the Office of Life and Justice for the Diocese of Camden, to help organize this JustFaith workshop. JustFaith Ministries, started in 1989 in Kentucky, provides workshops in faith communities around the nation, to educate those committed to social justice ministry. The eight weeks were “an opportunity to form a community, get to know each other, and understand comprehensive immigration reform from the perspective of our Gospel teaching, our Catholic social teaching, and what the U.S. Catholic bishops have written about the need for reform,” noted DiPaul. “We can no longer stand idly by, while so many of our undocumented brothers and sisters are burdened so heavily, day in and day out. We have to take a look at the systems, structures, and laws that need to change, to create a better quality of life for (immigrants).” For more information on JustFaith, and to schedule a JustFaith module for your parish, call Larry DiPaul at 856-583-6119, or e-mail LDipaul@camdendiocese.org
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Author:Admin2
Photo by Peter G. Sánchez Sister Elizabeth Halaj, LSIC, holds up the Facebook logo, letting youth know that Jesus is in her social network, during Holy Eucharist’s Vocation Panel on March 1, as Sister Ann Byrnes, RSM looks on.     St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill, hosted a “Vocation Panel” on Tuesday March 1. The Vocation Panel was one of the steps the parish adapted in its efforts to promote priestly and religious vocations. Seminarian Kevin Mohan opened the gathering leading everyone in singing the “Servant Song.” Students and teachers in grades 5 through 8 in the Religious Education Program attended the panel along with members of the Parish’s Youth Ministry Program. The panel consisted of Father Michael Romano, parochial vicar at Incarnation Parish, Mantua; Seminarian Kevin Mohan, St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral, Camden; Sister Anne Kapler, RSM Merion,Pa.; Sister Elizabeth Halaj, LSIC , Cherry Hill; and Deacon Anthony Maletesta, Holy Eucharist Parish, Cherry Hill. The gathering began with panelists sharing about the vows, their own vocational call, their formation process, and the various ways they minister in parish, school, and community. Students submitted questions for each panelist and Jake Casey and Julianna Fabricus, eighth grade students in the Religious Education Program, asked the questions of the panelists. Sister Ann Byrnes,RSM, pastoral associate, ended the evening with a visual prayer reflection depicting various Church Vocations. Devon Sheehan, fifth grade student, said, “I really liked Father Mike, he was very clear about the responsibilities of a priest.”. James McFadden, grade seven said, “It was good to hear from a Religious, priest and a deacon from other parishes.” “I never knew that Sisters took vows and it was interesting to hear about the training that a priest and deacon experience,” said Jonathan Cole, grade seven.
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This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, March 27 (Third Sunday of Lent) St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill www.stthomasmorenj.org Parish Mission with Fr. Dennis O’Donnell 7:30 p.m. in church (continues on Monday and Tuesday) Monday, March 28 St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill www.stthomasmorenj.org 9 a.m. Mass and conference, “Putting on the Attitude of Christ - Part I”; 10 a.m. confessions; 1 to 4:30 p.m. quiet prayer with time for individual interviews for spiritual growth; 7:30 p.m. conference, “Putting on the Attitude of Christ - Part II” St. Mary Parish, Cherry Hill www.stmarycherryhill.org 7:30 p.m. (chapel) presentation about Sacrament of Penance titled “The Healing Mercy of God” St. Aloysius Parish, Oaklyn www.staloysiusnj.org 6:40 p.m. Rosary; 7 p.m. Mass; 7:30 p.m. Miraculous Medal Novena St. Katharine Drexel Parish, Egg Harbor Township 7 p.m. Parish Mission, “Give Us Living Water” Tuesday, March 29 St. Joseph Parish, Somers Point www.stjosephsomerspoint.com 7:50 a.m. Rosary; 8:15 a.m. Morning Prayer; 8:30 a.m. Mass; 9 a.m. Adoration throughout day, concluding with Benediction at 7 p.m.; 7 p.m. evening of music, prayer and reflection titled “Change Our Hearts” presented by Carl Granieri and Hearts Afire St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill www.stthomasmorenj.org Parish Mission with Fr. Dennis O’Donnell 7:30 p.m. in church Wednesday, March 30 Notre Dame de la Mer, Wildwood www.notredamedelamer.org 7 a.m. Mass at St. Ann Church; 8:30 a.m. Mass at Assumption Church Soup-er Speaker from 5 to 7 p.m. St. Charles Borromeo Parish, Washington Township www.saint-charles-borromeo.org 9 a.m. Mass; 6:30 p.m. Simple Supper and Part I of “Passion of the Christ” Thursday, March 31 Holy Eucharist Parish, Cherry Hill www.stpiusx.net 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. Masses; 7 p.m. Lenten meditation, “God's Invitation: Come Back to Me” presented by Sr. Beth Butler, MSBT of the Mother Boniface Spirituality Center Christ Our Light Parish, Cherry Hill www.christourlight.net 8 a.m. Mass; 7:30 p.m. “Prayer Around the Cross” in church Friday, April 1 St. Gianna Beretta Molla, Northfield www.stgiannanorthfieldnj.org 8:30 a.m. Mass followed by Stations of the Cross; 6:30 p.m. Via Crucis in Spanish followed by 7 p.m. Mass in Spanish Our Lady Star of the Sea, Atlantic City www.olssparish.com 5:15 p.m. Mass; 5:45 p.m. Stations of the Cross; 6 p.m. Adoration with Scripture Reflection; 7 p.m. Benediction St. Peter Parish, Merchantville www.stpeterrcc.org 6:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. Masses; 6 p.m. Soup, Stations and Solidarity - Enjoy Father Anthony’s pasta fagioli followed by Stations of the Cross in church at 7 p.m.
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