Results 3511 - 3540 of 6351

Columns/A Pastoral Message
Author:Monsignor Thomas J. Morgan
Christmas is about the birthday of Jesus of Nazareth; it is about our Lord Jesus Christ. Christmas is about rejoicing that God sent his Son to be with us; it is about the Almighty transcendent God taking on flesh; it is about God becoming a living, breathing, walking and talking human being. Christmas is the most beautiful and splendid season of the year. The celebration of the unique birth of Jesus Christ, God and Man, makes this season both splendid and beautiful. The celebration of his birth into a family makes this season a time of joy and a time of thankfulness; a time to reflect and a time to convert; a time to focus on our individual as well as our family lives. Of all the families in human history, the family of Jesus stands above all others. This family is outstanding for its holiness, genuineness, understanding and acceptance of one another. This family is featured on greeting cards, in display windows and in the carols of the season. Not health, wealth, education, location or social status accounts for their place of prominence in human history. To the contrary, Mary and Joseph were poor. They were unschooled country people. Externally, they had nothing to distinguish them above any other Israelite of their time. Internally, what distinguished them were their holy hearts and their close personal relationship with God. It is this that has given them lasting greatness. It is this that motivates us to look at them as a model family. They illustrate God’s plan for a family. They challenge all of us to pattern our homes after the heart of God. The Sacred Scriptures describe Joseph as a just and holy man; as a gentle and sensitive man; as a compassionate and merciful man. He loved Mary and was unwilling to expose her to public shame or disgrace. He listened to the voice of God and was committed and yielding to everything God asked of him. Joseph was not a passive uninvolved husband and father. Instead, he led his family in seeking God. His faithful walk with God provided a spiritually secure environment in which his wife and child could grow and develop emotionally, physically and spiritually. Being a father is a sacred vocation. It is a dignified calling. It demands courage. It demands commitment. In addition, at the same time fathers have tremendous power in the home. They have the power of witness and the power of modeling. The Sacred Scriptures describe Mary as a focused woman who lived in Nazareth, which was a center of commerce known at that time for its materialism and profiteering. She separated herself from anything that would defile her body, mind and spirit. She was a spirit-filled woman who was chosen for the special task of carrying in her womb the Son of God. Mary offered her body to be used by God for his purposes. Mary was willing to endure the physical pain of childbirth. She was willing to endure the challenge of raising a Son for the joy of being used by God. She encouraged his vocation. Being a mother is a special vocation. It is one of the most challenging tasks there is. It is one of the most demanding tasks there is. It is one of the most sacred tasks there is. A mother’s love, compassion and spirituality are at the heart of every family. Mary was a grateful and worshipping woman. In the “Magnificat,” she unleashes one of the most magnificent songs of praise in all of human history. Her heart overflows with praise for the wonderful acts and mercy of God in her life. Her greatest delight was not in being known. However, she wanted to make her Son Jesus known to everyone. Mary spends sleepless nights in prayer. She spends long nights in fasting. She relinquishes anything that would get in the way of fulfilling the purpose for which God created her. Her prayers and her compassion were at the heart of the home in Nazareth. Christmas is a time when we evaluate our homes in the light of the Holy Family portrait. How do we seek God? How do we walk with God? How do we grow in holiness? How do we encourage vocations? In this Christmas Season, I pray that God will rise up this generation of husbands, wives and young people in the footsteps of Jesus, Mary and Joseph in building God-centered and God-focused homes. Msgr. Thomas J. Morgan is pastor of St. Mary Parish and St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill.
Thursday, 22 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/Growing in Faith
Author:Michael M. Canaris
People of the Book - Samson The book of Judges tells the story of Samson, the heroic leader of Israel whose name means “man of the sun” and whose legendary strength provided the namesake for the popular line of durable luggage. He is one of the more intriguing characters of ancient Israel. The connection between Samson and the mythological heroes of the ancient Mediterranean world are undeniable. It remains impossible to read the account of his tremendous feats and adventures (killing a lion with his bare hands, slaughtering entire armies with only the jawbone of an ass) and not think of the Aegean Hercules or Mesopotamian Enkidu from the Epic of Gilgamesh. Yet, there are significant spiritual insights which move beyond fanciful tales and warrant Samson’s inclusion in both our Scriptures and our contemporary contemplation. Samson was born to a family in the line of the tribe of Dan after a miraculous appearance of an angel to his mother. This heavenly messenger instructed that Samson was to be a Nazirite from birth. This term normally applied to an adult who took a voluntary vow of abstinence from intoxicating beverages, association with corpses in any way, and cutting one’s hair. Herein lies one of Samson’s lessons. Apart from the aesthetic decision to avoid ancient barbers, the Nazirite reflected the Hebrew belief that certain things or people were “separated” (nazir), consecrated for a special purpose and somehow inherently different. Samson in this sense is a precursor to all Christians, men and women St. John will describe as “in but not of the world” (Jn 17) and whom St. Peter will call “a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, God’s special possession” (1 Pet 2:9). As maddening as it may be for teenagers and college undergraduates who want nothing more than to fit in, we are all called to be somehow different, to look upon the world’s allures with skepticism. However, this need not be a purely negative, doom and gloom, condemnatory reality. I myself am far from an ascetic, and while I don’t have much contact with dead bodies, a hot shave with a straight razor or a Bushmill’s Manhattan after a long week are to my mind pretty harmless (unless attempted simultaneously). The uniqueness of such a call goes beyond mere avoidance of life’s pleasures, and extends to the entire human family. Consider what C.S. Lewis wrote in “The Problem of Pain”: [Consider] not how, but why, [God] makes each soul unique. If he had no use for all these differences, I do not see why he should have created more souls than one.... The mould in which a key is made would be a strange thing, if you had never seen a key: and the key itself a strange thing if you had never seen a lock. Your soul has a curious shape because it is a hollow made to fit a particular swelling in the infinite contours of the divine substance, or a key to unlock one of the doors in the house with many mansions. For it is not humanity in the abstract that is to be saved, but you — you the individual.” Samson’s difference, his distinction and separation from the ordinary, is something to be gloriously celebrated, as is every man, woman, and child’s. I recently read somewhere that George W. Bush claimed that this nation was founded on similar principles, most importantly that “no insignificant person was ever born.” Regardless of one’s political leanings or how one feels he or we have lived up to such a statement (the abominable practice of slavery leaps to my mind), I would place the onus of responsibility for denying the sentiment itself squarely on the shoulders of those who would claim otherwise. Besides including the intrinsic attraction of the torrid and seductive affair between Samson and the beautiful but cruel Delilah, the book of Judges reminds Jews and Christians that each and every individual is directly created by God, and is biologically, chemically and spiritually unrepeatable and irreplaceable, “set apart” from one another. Each is consecrated by virtue of her or his reflecting the divine imago Dei, each given inimitable strengths and talents (albeit limited ones) by the divine, and each called to dedicate oneself fully to the God who tells us we are “fearfully and wonderfully made.” Michael M. Canaris is an administrator at Fairfield University’s Center for Faith and Public Life and is on the faculty for the Department of Philosophy, Theology, and Religious Studies at Sacred Heart University.
Thursday, 22 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/As I See It
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Over the past few years, along with “A Christmas Story,” “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” and “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” an annual tradition during the Advent season for me has been to watch the 2003 movie, “Elf,” starring Will Ferrell. This contemporary classic has the right mix of holiday spirit and chuckles to appeal to both children and adults. At the start of “Elf,” we see a baby boy in a crib being cared for by religious sisters at an orphanage in New York City on Christmas Eve. When Santa Claus pays a visit, the boy stows away inside Santa’s bag, unbeknownst to the big guy, and ends up at the North Pole, where he is taken in by Santa and his elves, named “Buddy,” and helps out in the Christmas workshop. Fast-forward 30 years and Buddy realizes that, as a human, he has outgrown the elves and the North Pole, and must return to New York to find his father, Walter (James Caan), and live a normal life as a human. In New York, Buddy’s child-like innocence and belief in Santa Claus (“I know him!”) contrasts with the cynical city-goers, who look in disbelief at the man who congratulates the “World’s Best Cup of Coffee” restaurant for their achievement, and gets into a fight with another Santa Claus, because he’s not the real deal. In Matthew 18:3, Jesus tells us that “unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.” Buddy’s childlike behavior comes from the fact that, growing up in the North Pole, he witnessed firsthand the magic of Santa Claus and Christmas. Unfortunately, as Papa Elf (Bob Newhart) tells him, the citizens of New York don’t believe in Santa Claus and their Christmas spirit is waning. Worse yet, Buddy’s father is on Santa’s naughty list. Because they have not been to the North Pole, the city does not believe Buddy or understand him. In the face of criticism, however, Buddy continues to be joyous and upbeat, with unwavering spirit, always standing up for Santa Claus and Christmas. He has knowledge of the goodness of Santa and the hope and truth he represents. In regard to the kingdom of heaven, we should be more like Buddy, and less like the New Yorkers: “Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed” (John 20:29). In the beginning of our lives, having faith “like little children,” we believe in the goodness of life, and believe that we will never be let down by anything or anyone on this earth. However, as time goes by and we mature, we suffer heartache and loss, and a bit of our innocence, and a bit of our joy, can disappear. In this Advent season, it is important to remember the savior who is coming, and maintain that wonder and awe of the great works he has done throughout our lives, in the midst of our struggles, and his ultimate promise to us. It is better to be like Buddy the Elf than Walter, and recall him “whom, though now ye see him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory” (1 Peter 1:8). Peter G. Sánchez is a staff writer for the Catholic Star Herald.
Thursday, 22 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Opportunities for Youth and Young Adults
Author:Carmela Malerba
Theology on Tap for Young Adults, “For God’s Sake or Pete’s?: Reflections on a Relational God,” with Msgr. Roger McGrath, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Landmark Americana, Glassboro, $10 buffet. For more info call Greg Coogan, 856-583-6122. Knights of Columbus Councils 7463 and 7774 will hold a free throw contest for boys and girls ages 10 thru 14, Jan. 14, 2012 from 9 a.m. to noon at Christ the Redeemer Assumption Campus Hall, Atco. For info call Bob Hayes, 856-753-3095. St. Peter Christian Singles Club, Merchantville, has many scheduled events for December and January 2012. Affiliate parishes: St. Stephen, Pennsauken; Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Maple Shade. Email: stpetersover21@yahoo.com or call club director, John Edelmayer, 856-663-3759 for more event information and the membership drive for 2012. St. Rose Young Adult Ministry (ages 18 to 40), Haddon Heights, meets Fridays from 7:30 to 8 p.m. followed by activity and socializing. For more information, email George, St.Rose.Yam@gmail.com, or see http://strose.hurricaneweb.net Knights of Columbus will hold their annual free throw championship, Jan. 14, 2012 at 1 p.m. in St. Joseph gymnasium, Somers Point. Pickup registration form at the school office or from the athletic director. Questions? Call Bob Lewis, 609-653-4867. Youth Ministry Program, Church of the Holy Family: Meetings, monthly Mass, dinners and service opportunities, retreats, group adventures and leadership programs. For more information contact Julie LaRosa, 856-228-2215 or jlarosa@churchoftheholyfamily.org (www.churchoftheholyfamily.org/jryouthreg for 5th and 6th grade program; www.churchoftheholyfamily.org/sryouthreg for high school program). Our Lady of Peace Parish, Williamstown, youth groups: junior, sixth to eighth grades; senior, ninth to 12th grades; young adults ages 18 to 25, ACTS. Contact Kari A. Janisse, work 856-629-6142, ext. 20, cell 973-534-8960, email youthministerkari@gmail.com, website www.YouthGroupInfo.com Divine Mercy Parish, Vineland, Young Youth Group for children in grades 3 to 6, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. second Friday of month, church hall. For more information, call Michael and Shirley Velazquez, 856-696-2241. Hearts of Fire, 7th and 8th grade youth program at Church of the Holy Family, Sewell, combines traditional material covered in religious education Confirmation class and takes it a step further. For more information contact Julie LaRosa, 856-228-2215 or jlarosa@churchoftheholyfamily.org
Thursday, 22 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
3515. Read to Feed
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Carmela Malerba
Guardian Angels Regional School second grade class recently participated in the Heifer International Read to Feed read-a-thon. The students gathered donations for each book they read and raised enough money to donate for a goat, a sheep, a pig, three rabbits and two flocks of chickens. These animals will be given to families around the world to provide better nutrition, fiber for clothing and a source of income from milk, eggs and offspring.
Friday, 06 June 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Rich Luongo
Photo by James A. McBride Ermelinda Sgro of Glassboro shops for Nativity figurines in Italy every year GLASSBORO — In July Ermelinda Sgro will be traveling to Italy again, as she does every year, to pick up more figurines — particularly a comet — to add to her rather elaborate Nativity scene she assembles each Christmas. “I can’t find a comet here,” she said. Ermelinda, a pharmacist, came here from her native Naples in 1962 and set up her practice. “Figurines are made in many parts of Italy but the best are from Naples and Sicily,” she said. “Mary and Joseph couldn’t find a place to eat or rest. They were sent away. And the baker is there making bread, the bread of life.”
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Español/Spanish/Español/Spanish
Author:Admin2
LA HABANA (CNS) — El presidente cubano Raúl Castro anunció que su país liberará 2,900 presos políticos durante la primavera, movida que atribuye parcialmente a la venidera visita del papa Benedicto XVI. Castro dijo en un discurso ante la Asamblea Nacional que el Consejo de Estado había tomado en consideración la visita papal, así como las solicitudes de miembros de familias de presos y de altos funcionarios católicos. Él también mencionó el 400mo aniversario de la Virgen de la Caridad del Cobre, patrona de Cuba. El papa Benedicto XVI ha dicho que visitará Cuba y México antes de la Pascua, aunque las fechas oficiales no han sido anunciadas. Cuba liberó aproximadamente 50 presos políticos en el 2010, movida que el cardenal Jaime Ortega Alamino de La Habana dijo fue popular dentro del país pero aun más importante para las relaciones exteriores. El trato de Cuba hacia los opositores políticos ha sido durante mucho tiempo un elemento clave en el embargo económico estadounidense contra la nación durante 50 años. Castro dijo ante la Asamblea Nacional el 23 de diciembre que los liberados incluirían enfermos, ancianos, mujeres y jóvenes que tengan potencial de reintegrarse a la sociedad cubana.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Español/Spanish/Español/Spanish
Author:Admin2
WASHINGTON (CNS) — Al Secretariado Para el Clero, la Vida Consagrada y las Vocaciones de la Conferencia Estadounidense de Obispos Católicos se le ha otorgado una concesión de $85,000 de parte de la fundación Conrad N. Hilton para explorar por qué los hispanos no están representados equitativamente entre el clero y los religiosos estadounidenses. La encuesta está orientada a identificar rasgos culturales comunes y distintivos que afectan la apertura y disponibilidad de los jóvenes católicos a responder al llamado a la vocación del sacerdocio o la vida consagrada. El secretariado ha comisionado el Centro Para la Investigación Aplicada en el Apostolado de la universidad Georgetown para realizar un encuesta nacional entre católicos que nunca se han casado, de 14 años de edad y mayores, para estudiar sus opiniones acerca de las vocaciones y sus propias consideraciones de una vocación. La concesión de un año de duración del grupo basado en Los Ángeles también será usada para financiar un seminario sobre la vida consagrada para los obispos estadounidenses. Los datos estadísticos encontrados en dos informes comisionados por el secretariado, “The Class of 2011: Survey of Ordinands to the Priesthood” y “The Profession Class of 2010: Survey of Women Religious Professing Perpetual Vows”, indican menos vocaciones religiosas que lo esperado entre las poblaciones hispanas de Estados Unidos. Padre Shawn McKnight, director ejecutivo del secretariado, dijo que los hispanos constituyen el 15 por ciento de la clase de ordenación y el 10 por ciento de la clase de profesión, pero son el 34 por ciento de la población católica adulta total.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Admin2
Alumni and friends of Gloucester Catholic High School were honored recently during the annual Communion Breakfast attended by more than 300 guests. The awards and winners were: — John and Jackie O’Donnell Award (given annually to a graduate of Gloucester Catholic who demonstrates generous service to the Gloucester Catholic school community) Recipient: Larry Reader, ‘58 Reader is a graduate of the class of 1958 and has remained connected to Gloucester Catholic throughout the years. Larry and his wife Barbara (class of 1960) were an integral part of the founding of the Alumni Association in the early 1980s. Larry had a successful career at Rowan University, rising to the position of vice president, and upon retirement began working for the Camden Diocese. — Dr. Frank and Catherine Kelly Award (This award is given annually to a friend of GCHS who through their good work brings honor and recognition to the school) Recipient: Tony Powers Although Powers is not a true alumnus of GCHS, he has been affiliated with GCHS in many capacities over the years dating back to the early 1970s. He has served over 35 years at GCHS as a teacher, head basketball coach and assistant basketball coach in two different eras, and as assistant athletic director, dean of students, and guidance counselor. — Thomas Stewart III Award (awarded to a Gloucester Catholic graduate that demonstrates selfless commitment and extraordinary service to the greater community) Recipient: Thomas Citro, ‘54 As a long-time resident of Springfield, Pa., Citro has been a member of the Springfield Lions Club for 28 years and served as the club’s 50th president. He has served in many other roles for the organization, including first and second vice president. He earned his bachelor of arts degree from St. Bonaventure University and a master of arts from Villanova. — Gloucester Catholic Alumni Association Legacy Award (given on a random basis to recognize someone who through their dedication and commitment to Gloucester Catholic through the years have left an indelible mark on the Gloucester Catholic Community) Recipients: Leroy Jackson, ’44, and Clare Ward, ‘40 Leroy Jackson is a 1944 graduate of Gloucester Catholic and through the years has steadfastly supported GCHS. He had been a regular on the sidelines at the Gloucester Catholic football games for many years and had nine children attend GCHS. Clare Ward graduated Gloucester Catholic in 1940 and was a fixture at the school during all eight of her children’s careers at GCHS. She was active in the PTA and still is a huge fan and follows all the events at GCHS closely today.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
In boys’ Catholic school basketball action last week, St. Margaret’s Regional School 8th graders (Woodbury Heights) defeated St. Joseph’s Regional School 8th graders (Somers Point) by a score of 36-16, playing on Monday, Dec. 26. A day later, the home team Bishop Eustace Prep Crusaders (Pennsauken) defeated the visiting Sacred Heart High School Lions (Vineland) 81-57. At left, Sacred Heart’s Dustin Graiff (12) blocks the shot of Bishop Eustace’s Sho Dasilva. Below, St. Joseph’s Owen Napalac goes up for a shot. Photos by Alan M. Dumoff
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
Author:Admin2
Rowan University students in El Salvador last June were Ben Chapman, far left; then, clockwise, Sarah Gettings, Juan Roche, Andrew Thompson, Kelly Barb, and Rosa Metz in the front. All but Chapman left earlier this week for another trip to El Salvador as part of the school’s Engineers Without Borders - U.S.A. project. They’ve been suite mates, classmates, study partners and officers of the Newman Club (Catholic Campus Ministry) at Rowan University. Since their freshman year in 2009, Sarah Gettings and Gemma Peebles have gotten to be BFFs, sharing college life on an almost-daily basis. Today, they are thrilled they are half a world away from each other. That sentiment is for a good cause. Gettings, a junior chemical engineering major from Runnemede, and Peebles, a junior civil and environmental engineering major from East Windsor, are part of teams that are traveling for about two weeks this month to El Salvador in Central America and The Gambia in Africa as part of Rowan’s ongoing Engineers Without Borders - USA projects. Gettings is project lead for the El Salvador team. Peebles is the EWB’s web master and clinic team lead handling the planning and paperwork for The Gambia project. She also is preparing to take over the project lead role from Sean Coffey for The Gambia effort. (Coffey, a senior civil and environmental engineering major from West Long Branch, who is dating Gettings, also is a member of the Newman Club.) The El Salvador team is continuing work that started almost five years ago in La Ceiba — a town that is home to about 750 people and that suffers from severe water contamination. In May 2007, several Rowan students and a professor traveled to La Ceiba for an initial assessment, which consisted of land surveying, water-quality testing and learning about community members’ needs. Another team visited in 2008 to gather further data. Their original plan included drilling one well and obtaining water from an aquifer that is not contaminated and delivering it to 15 spigots throughout the town. However, the team determined that plan would have been too costly for Rowan to help implement (about $50,000) and the villagers to maintain ($6 to $9 a month per household). Last year and this past summer, teams built and installed household biosand filters, filters that are filled with sand over which develops a biologic layer. When a user pours water into filter, the biologic layer eats bacteria and the sand filters out particulates, making the water safe to drink. Locals help build and deliver the filters. The 2012 team will continue that work. “We will be building and installing 15 new biosand filters, and we will be monitoring 20 filters that were installed during previous trips. The monitoring involves water-quality testing and surveying the filter recipients,” said Gettings, who traveled as part of EWB to El Salvador for the first time in June, her only trip ever out of the United States. Faculty advisor for the El Salvador team is Dr. Jess Everett, a civil and environmental engineering professor. Aldo Cevallos will travel with the team. He is a professional engineer living in Voorhees. Rowan’s EWB also has a history in The Gambia. Three years ago, teams started working on improving the dirt Kudang-Kuntaur Road — a link between eight villages and market towns Kudang and Kuntaur — that was at least waist deep with water for close to four months of the year. The students assisted The Gambia Horse & Donkey Trust, a non-governmental organization with an office in a village, and locals, who raised the road in summer 2010 to reduce the flooding. This month, Rowan students will monitor that project in the Niamina East Region of The Gambia, Africa’s smallest country, and also assess water pumps, including some  funded by The Gambia Horse & Donkey Trust in all eight villages. Faculty advisor for the Africa team is Everett, and traveling with the students will be Dr. Hong Zhang, an associate professor of mechanical engineering. The two January trips will not be the end of Rowan’s outreach to those countries. “The La Ceiba project will be ongoing,” said Gettings, who joined EWB as a freshman to help others. “There are 150 households in the community of La Ceiba, and each one of them will eventually have a biosand filter. A big part of our project is education. We teach the filter recipients how the filters work and how to take care of them properly. We also have them participate in the construction process. With this knowledge, the community members are able to help us get more filters done on each trip. It is our hope that sometime in the next few trips they will no longer need our help and will be able to build and maintain these biosand filters on their own. In the meantime, teams of Rowan students will continue to go down to La Ceiba to help the community make the filters.” “I am excited to go back and see some of the community members I met last time, especially the kids,” Gettings added. “I am nervous because we planned more work for this trip than for any of our previous trips. We should be able to get it all done with help from the community, but there is always the ‘what if.’” As for the future of the Africa project, Peebles said that depends on what the January trip unveils. “If the villagers don’t need any help with their pumps and the road is fine, then as far as EWB is concerned, we’re done and we need to fill out paperwork for closeout. If we can continue with the pumps and/or the road, then we’ll continue,” said Peebles, who has never been out of the country. “I don’t know if I will be traveling again but if the project continues there will be other teams in the future.” Peebles, who joined EWB as a freshman and also is a member of the Air Force ROTC, had similar reasons as Gettings for getting involved with EWB. “I joined because it was what I wanted to do with my life, bring sustainable solutions to people less fortunate,” she said. “Everything I have in life has landed right in my lap, but there are people out there without things as simple as clean water. It is for this reason that I chose civil engineering, why I joined the Air Force and why I’m in EWB.” EWB-USA is a non-profit organization committed to designing and implementing engineering projects in developing communities around the world. Such projects include renewable energy, clean water supplies and sustainable enterprise development.  The organization’s volunteers also include individuals with backgrounds in business, journalism, health and education, according to the organization. Rowan’s EWB chapter also has worked on projects in Senegal in Africa; Honduras; and Thailand, among other locations. The El Salvador team departed Philadelphia International Airport on Tuesday, Jan. 3. The following Rowan students traveled to El Salvador: Sarah Gettings, 20, Runnemede, a junior chemical engineering major; Jake Scaramazza, 19, Woodstown, a sophomore chemical engineering major;      Kelly Barb, 19, Sewell, a junior chemical engineering and Spanish major;       Rosa Metz, 20, Hillsborough, a junior secondary education major;      Samantha Powell, 21, Collingswood, a junior communication studies major;       Juan Roche, 31, Camden, a mechanical engineering graduate student; and Andrew Thompson, 22, Banner Elk, N.C., a senior electrical and computer engineering major The Gambia team flew out of Philadelphia International Airport on Monday, Jan. 2. Team members are: Sean Coffey, 21, West Long Branch, a senior civil and environmental engineering major; Andrea McFarland, Doylestown, Pa., a sophomore civil and environmental engineering major; and Gemma Peebles, 20, East Windsor, a junior civil and environmental engineering major.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Sister Mary Dwyer, IHM, formerly Sister Maria Redempta, IHM, who taught at St. Teresa School, Runnemede, died on Dec. 13, 2011, in Camilla Hall, in the 65th year of her religious life. She was 84 years old. Born in Philadelphia, Sister entered the Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in 1946, and professed her first vows in 1949. She received her Bachelor of Arts from Immaculata University, and a Master of Education from West Chester University. From 1953-61, Sister taught at St. Teresa School in Runnemede. She also taught at elementary schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and in the dioceses of Allentown; Savannah, Ga.; Metuchen, N.J.; and Arlington, Va. In 2007, she was assigned to Camilla Hall, Immaculata, Pa., where her ministry was the apostolate of prayer. A funeral Mass was celebrated at Camilla Hall on Dec. 17. The members of her religious community; a sister, Catherine Meyers; and a brother, Francis Dwyer; nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews survive Sister. Her parents, Francis and Elizabeth Foley Dwyer, predeceased her.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Medical Mission Sister Jean Mouch, M.D., 66, who lived and worked in Camden since 1997, died Jan, 1 of cancer. A public health specialist, Sister Jean chaired the Medical Mission Sisters’ Office of Community Health Evaluation, Planning and Research and through it consulted on health assessment and improvement programs with Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, the Department of Community Health Improvements, Project H.O.P.E. (Homeless Outreach Program Enrichment) and Health Advocates for Youth. She also was a member and former chair of CAMConnect: Linking Community and Information, and part of the group Camden City Futures that completed the first community health needs assessment of Camden since 1995. A native of Cincinnati, Sister Jean entered the Medical Mission Sisters in Philadelphia in 1964. She earned her medical degree from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York in 1975 and completed a residency at St. Louis University in St. Louis, Mo., before being assigned to her community’s hospitals in Africa. She served 12 years in Berekum, Ghana, West Africa, where she helped to develop district health services into a primary health care system. Sister Jean also worked two years in Attat, Ethiopia. Between assignments, she received a master’s degree in maternal/child health from the University of London’s School of Tropical Child Health. Sister Jean served as coordinator of the Camden County Cancer Coalition, implementing the NJ Cancer Control Plan at the local and county levels. For her many services to the city, in 2003 she received a “Woman of Outstanding Achievement Award” from the Girl Scouts of Camden County. A funeral Mass will be celebrated for Sister Jean on Friday, Jan. 6, at 10:30 a.m. at the Medical Mission Sisters’ North American Headquarters at 8400 Pine Road, Fox Chase, Philadelphia. Burial will follow in the Sisters’ Cemetery.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Leo Joseph Heintzelman, 49, of Margate, brother of Father Joseph Heintzelman, died Dec. 26, 2011. A lifelong resident of Margate and owner of Dino’s Sub Shop on Ventnor Avenue, Mr. Heintzelman was a generous sponsor and charitable supporter of various local causes throughout the years. He was a graduate of Holy Spirit High School in Absecon, and was past president and longtime member of the Margate Log Cabin, a member of the Margate Business Association, and the Somers Point American Legion. An avid sports enthusiast, Mr. Heintzelman cherished his beloved Pittsburgh Steelers, as well as spending time on his boat and playing competitive pool. In addition to his brother, Father Heintzelman, pastor of St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Mays Landing, he is survived by his fiancée, Susan Allabaugh; mother, Florence (Capelli) Heintzelman of Margate; sisters Linda H. (William) Gesell of Red Bank, NJ and Eileen P. (Richard) Statsuk of Somers Point; and brother Richard G. (Gabrielle) Heintzelman of Fair Haven, NJ. He is also survived by seven nieces, and two nephews, and seven grand-nephews and one grand-niece. He was predeceased by his father, Edward F. Heintzelman, Sr.; his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Capelli of Atlantic City, and aunt, Sister Mary Josette of the Sisters of Mercy. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Thursday, Dec. 29, at Holy Trinity Parish, Blessed Sacrament Church, Margate. Interment was at Holy Cross Cemetery, Mays Landing. In lieu of flowers, send donations to either Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Attn: Lara Goldstein, Suite 110, 925 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19107, or to the Trauma Center of the AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center, Atlantic City, NJ.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Carmela Malerba
Photos by Alan M. Dumoff St. Andrew the Apostle Parish in Gibbsboro celebrated a special 2 p.m. Christmas Eve Mass for U.S. military serving in Afghanistan. The unit of service men and women, recently adopted by the parish, informed St. Andrew that they would not have a military chaplain present to offer Christmas services, so the Gibbsboro parish reached out to NBC 10 Philadelphia, which live streamed the Mass online. St. Andrew pastor, Msgr. Louis Marucci, received permission from Bishop Joseph Galante to celebrate the early service to accommodate the time difference in Afghanistan and allow soldiers to have an 11:30 p.m. Christmas Eve Mass. At left, Msgr. Marucci (center) celebrates Mass, assisted by Deacons William Slaven and Vincent Okoro. Right, U.S. military servicemen pray in the church.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
The New Jersey Hall of Fame was created “to honor citizens who have made invaluable contributions to society and the world beyond. The Hall of Fame reinforces the message to children that they can and should strive for excellence in any endeavor of their choosing,” according to its website (www.njhalloffame.org). Fifty individuals have been nominated for the fifth class of the New Jersey Hall of Fame. Thomas Nast is not the only figure some people would consider controversial. For example, nominee Aaron Burr served as Thomas Jefferson’s vice president but he will always be remembered for killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel. Nast is not even the only cartoonist. Also nominated is Charles Addams, whose characters became known as The Addams Family and inspired two television shows, three movies and a Broadway musical. Some of the other nominees are actors Alan Alda and Michael Douglas; singers Connie Francis and Dionne Warwick; jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie; President Grover Cleveland; football great Roosevelt Grier; photographer Alfred Stieglitz; writers Dorothy Parker and Joyce Carol Oates; and Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman. Anyone may nominate an individual to the New Jersey Hall of Fame. A panel approves a list which is then submitted to Hall of Fame Voting Academy, a group of more than 100 of the most prominent organizations throughout the state. The Academy votes to narrow the field to 10 individuals in each category. The Board of Commissioners prepares and votes on a final list for the public vote. The nominees are announced in September of each year. The public votes through the Hall of Fame website. Following the certification of the public vote, the New Jersey Hall of Fame inducts the top vote getter in each category, as well as one or two others as the board deems deserving.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Rich Luongo
CAMDEN — The controversial nomination of cartoonist Thomas Nast to the New Jersey Hall of Fame is stirring up debate among some people of Irish descent and Roman Catholics as well as New Jersey political figures. Lawrence Keeley, of the anti-Irish Defamation Federation in Philadelphia, said no one is denying that Nast was a world renowned cartoonist but he was also a bigot of the highest kind who disliked Irish, Catholics, and especially Irish-Catholics. “Why would New Jersey pick a bigot to honor in the Hall of Fame when there are plenty of good people — living and dead — who can be recognized?” Keeley asked. The Federation, Keeley pointed out, keeps its eye out on anything anti-Irish and anti-Irish Catholic. Nast, of Morristown (1840-1902), was a German-born caricaturist and editorial cartoonist who has been described as the “Father of the American Cartoon.” He is credited with creating enduring images of Santa Claus, Uncle Sam, the Republican Party elephant and the Democratic Party donkey. Bill Donohue, president of the Catholic League, said, “The New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHF) includes luminaries as diverse as Albert Einstein and Shaquille O’Neal. It should not be dishonored by including bigots. Thomas Nast, who made the first cut of the 50 nominees for the class of 2012, is the most bigoted cartoonist in American history.” According to Donohue, Nast’s cartoons show “a long and pernicious pattern of bigotry born of nativism.” Among his portrayal of Catholics and Irish, Nash depicted the Irish as a race of inferior gorillas and he demonized the church “as a nefarious institution threatening America’s public schools.” Donohue said he contacted Don Jay Smith, executive director of the NJHF, asking that Nast’s nomination be withdrawn. Assemblyman Wayne DeAngelo, (D-Mercer) also contacted Smith asking for the withdrawal of Nast’s name. The assemblyman indicated that in the midst of Nast’s political cartoons such as the depiction of Uncle Sam and the Democratic Party’s donkey and the Republicans’ elephant are “works that are racially charged and offensive.” He said the works that depict Irish Catholics in a demeaning light are “inflammatory and offensive to the thousands of Irish Catholics who call New Jersey home.” Assemblyman Scott Rudder (R-Burlington) is also calling for the Hall of Fame to eliminate Nast from the list of 2012 inductees. “Thomas Nast’s depictions of Santa Claus are beloved, but his portrayal of Irish Catholics was deplorable,” said Rudder, who is proud of his Irish heritage. “Nast’s inclusion on the public ballot for induction to the Hall of Fame is not only insulting to New Jersey residents of Irish descent or Catholic faith, but to people of every group that has been victimized by bigotry and stereotyping. I have asked the executive director of the Hall of Fame to have him removed from consideration immediately.” Donohue noted that the Hall of Fame calls itself “a source of learning, inspiration, and hope for children.” He said, “Nast was not a significant and powerful role model for children in the 19th century and he sure is not a role model for any U.S. citizen today.”
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Carmela Malerba
Photos left and right: by Alan M. Dumoff Above: Louis Buttrick and Lynn Corcoran bring in the new year during the New Year’s Eve celebration in St. James Memorial Hall, Holy Trinity Parish, Ventnor; eighth grade students from St. Joseph Regional School hosted a living Nativity for students in grades Pre-K-7 on Dec. 22. Isabella Knapp of Notre Dame Regional School wears a wreath of lit candles to portray St. Lucy during the school’s celebration of her feast day Dec. 13 at its Landisville campus.  
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Rich Luongo
Photos by James A. McBride Volunteers Richard Griggel, Jr., Joanne Griggel and Jillian Bottino help out at new Our Lady of Guadalupe Thrift Store and Donation Center in Somerdale, open Thursday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. SOMERDALE — Just in time for Christmas shopping, the Our Lady of Guadalupe Thrift Store and Donation Center opened its doors on Dec. 3 with an array of clothing, accessories and household items. Located on the first floor of the former Our Lady of Grace School on the White Hose Pike, Joe Bottino, one of the volunteers who mans the store, said, “We didn’t want to have a grand opening with only a few items so we actually bought some things to stock our shelves.” He pointed out items were purchased from retailers who were going out of business. “The merchandise is still in their packages,” he noted. “That’s the key. We want our thrift shop to look like a top-notch store.” Donated items are coming in almost every day, Joe explained. And that includes clothing for men, women, and children. “We want everybody who shops here to have a smile on their faces when they see the prices,” he said. “Every piece of clothing, for instance, is $2, and that includes suits.” The shop also features handbags, belts, and jewelry along with dishes, small appliances, and other household items. The idea for a thrift shop came when Joe had spoken with Father Joseph Cappella, pastor of Our Lady of Guadalupe, about doing something with the old Our Lady of Grace School building. Joe said, “When we came up with a thrift shop concept, Father said to go with it.” He pointed out that many parishioners, including his family, are donating many hours to make the thrift shop a success. “And we’re making the store look like a regular retail outlet,” said Joe. “Appearance is very important. The store is neat and inviting.” The thrift shop is advertised with signs on the White Horse Pike, in the Our Lady of Guadalupe church bulletin, and in the bulletins of other churches. “We’re even on Facebook,” Joe said. “But our biggest advertising medium is by word-of-mouth. It’s amazing what people can do.” The shop is open Thursday to Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The number of volunteers who will be in the store can be as many as 10 on the weekend. For more information call 856-784-0372.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
MERCHANTVILLE — The rooms are bare and the walls need paint, but in the three-floor, 19th century Victorian home on Maple Avenue here, hope resides. The goal is for the first L’Arche community, comprising those with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their assistants, will come together here where they will share meals and engage in fellowship. The Merchantville home will become the first L’Arche community in the state of New Jersey, joining 17 communities in the United States, and the 140 communities in 36 other countries. The roots of L’Arche trace back to 1964, when Jean Vanierbought a small, run-down home in Trosly-Breuil, France and invited two men with intellectual disabilities to come and live with him, to create a loving atmosphere centered on the Gospel. Coming from the French word for “ark” — as in Noah’s Ark, a symbol of hope — L’Arche has become a worldwide mission, dedicated to making known the gifts of those with developmental disabilities; to fostering a community that responds to the changing needs of its members, while being faithful to its core values; and to creating a better society. In 1997, Vanier was given the International Paul VI Award by Pope John Paul II, who called L’Arche a “providential seed of the civilization of love.” The communities that followed the first home are united by the same vision, and the spirit of welcoming, sharing, and simplicity that Vanier envisioned. L’Arche’s movement into New Jersey began 10 years ago, after a group of parents became concerned about the futures of their children with developmental disabilities. The Friends of L’Arche New Jersey began and once the Merchantville house, which was purchased last August, opens, it will officially become a L’Arche community. The home, which will house four adults with developmental disabilities (“core members”), and four assistants, will foster “relationships of mutuality, where (community members) are loved, and able to grow,” said Matt Rhodes, the Community Leader of Friends of L’Arche New Jersey. “The home is a shelter in the chaos,” he said. Each resident will have his or her own room, and there will be a hospitality room for guests. During the day, core members will attend a day program or work at their jobs. Afternoons and evenings will be filled with the simple aspects of daily life, such as grocery shopping, taking trips, preparing meals, and enjoying one another’s company. In the evening, the core members and assistants will share dinner together. The need is great in the state of New Jersey for homes for those with developmental disabilities. Some 3,000 of these individuals currently live in state-run institutions or developmental centers. Additionally, there are more than 10,000 individuals with developmental disabilities on the waiting list to receive a placement in a group home. The L’Arche Merchantville community will not only be the first of its kind in New Jersey, but the first in the Delaware Valley, and the first between D.C. and Boston. Friends of L’Arche NJ seeks to expand and open several more homes in the next decade. “The key is building relationships, with those in the home, God and community,” said Sister Bonnie McMenamin, SSJ, on the board of Friends of L’Arche New Jersey and the Camden Diocesan co-director of Ministry With the Deaf and Persons with Disabilities, adding that the home is “faith-and-family based.” A main hope for the core members is that “this will be their home for life,” says Rhodes. Currently, funds are being raised for the renovation of the Merchantville home, and the purchase and renovation of additional homes. For more information go to www.friendsoflarchenj.org or e-mail larchenj@gmail.com
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Peter Feuerherd
Dear reader of the Catholic Star Herald: Thank you for getting to your post box in the cold of a New Jersey winter to retrieve this publication and to read through it. You will notice some changes. Check out our new nameplate on page one. It’s less traditional and, we hope, more compelling and eye-catching. Check out the left side of the front page as we offer you tidbits about what you might expect as you open us up. The inside pages feature different fonts – graphic speak for print styles – and ways to better identify our sections. We will be regularly displaying the logo celebrating our 75th anniversary of the Diocese of Camden. It’s all part of our new look this year. The pages are a bit smaller – economics has its cruel dictates – but at the same time we’ve taken this opportunity, thanks to the expertise of Tom O’Shea, our graphics designer, to offer a cleaner, more modern look. Newspapers today need to stand out more than ever, thanks to competition from all kinds of technology which tempt our readers. Still, nearly 65,000 households receive this publication every week, making the Catholic Star Herald South Jersey’s largest newspaper. The staff here remains committed to a print vehicle to communicate the news of our diocese. But aren’t Catholic newspapers old news? Who goes to their diocesan newspaper anymore for information? How does a newspaper fit into a plan to reach younger people? Good questions, all. According to a recent study by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA), print publications still have a place in disseminating news about the church. They remind us that only 10 percent of Catholics prefer to get their diocesan news on line. What about that electronic youth connection? Not so overwhelming. In fact, CARA notes, more Catholics over the age of 60 are visiting Catholic websites than those under 30. Further info from the study: Only 4 percent of Catholics have read their diocesan newspaper on line in the past three months, but 26 percent say they have read a print copy. In the battle between print and social media and websites, it is well past time to cease hostilities. The church needs all forms of communication. But when it comes to the priority of reaching faithful Catholics, the diocesan newspaper has the widest reach, according to the CARA study. Diocesan newspapers in particular, note the study, are effective in reaching churchgoing Catholics. A majority of weekly Massgoers have read a copy of their diocesan newspaper. No other medium of communication comes close. The bottom line? Catholic diocesan newspapers are the best vehicle to reach those already involved in their parishes. Yes, we need to reach those who don’t go to Mass regularly, but there is no evidence to indicate that group is flocking to Catholic websites either. In terms of reaching committed Catholics, there is nothing electronic that comes anywhere close to your diocesan newspaper. Peter Feuerherd Associate Publisher Catholic Star Herald
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/21st Century Catholic
Author:Anthony T. Massimini
With the hurry and excitement of Christmas over, we can now quietly appreciate the peace and good will that Jesus’ birth brings to the world. The world is a special emphasis of Christmas. The Star over Bethlehem points to a lowly stable and a baby in a manger. Christmas brings heaven to earth. God is now with us, here on earth, in the flesh. Now when we pray to God, we don’t have to look “up” to heaven. Heaven is here. We can simply look around, at one another, at our family, community, society, nation and world. It is here that we see why Jesus was born. All around us is the challenge to bring Jesus’ peace and good will to the world. I like to explain the meaning of Christmas with a joke: When I was a young man I prayed to God for a million dollars. God replied, “OK. First, get a job.” Christmas means that God, now with us here on earth, is empowering us and making us spiritually responsible for our own lives in his grace. From now until Pentecost we can re-imagine what it was like for the people of Jesus’ time to experience him living among them. They watched him grow and flourish as a good and loving son, and work hard as a carpenter. They saw how he loved his friends. They listened to his message and wondered how such a young man could so deeply touch their hearts. And what a surprising young man he was! He cured the sick and blind. He told the poor, who were oppressed and depressed, that the Kingdom of God was theirs. He made a hated Samaritan the hero of one of his stories. He shocked the people’s social sensibilities by telling of a father who humiliated himself by running out of his house to greet his prodigal son. Who was this young man who was living and teaching such world-shaking values, who was loving them so deeply that he was literally changing their world? In Jesus’ everyday life we see the meaning of Christmas, and we see what Christmas is intended to mean for us. God is with us! We can see him. We can hear him. We can imitate him in our own lives. In fact, he is calling and empowering us precisely to imitate him in our own lives. The peace and good will that he promised by his birth is ours to cherish deep within our hearts, but only if we bring that same spiritual peace and good will to others. We have peace by making peace. We have good will by showing good will. Because of Christmas it is not enough for us to pray, “Dear God, bring peace to the world.” Or, “Help our government bring social justice to all.” As God non-jokingly replied in my little story, he now replies, “If you want peace and social justice, look to the peace and good will that I have given you, and go to work to bring peace and justice to the world. Show the world what I look like in human form.” Economic inequality is as great today as it was in the 1920s; unemployment is at an unacceptable high; many are hungry and broken; our politics are mired in “talking points” and lies; many people have lost their homes. As a result, it is difficult to “see” God in many parts of our society. Shall we look to God in heaven to correct all these injustices on his own while we do little or nothing? Is not God with us here on earth? There are now 74 million Catholics in the U. S., not to mention millions of Protestants, Jews, Muslims and others of good will. What would our country be like if we Catholics were able to organize a truly effective movement of peace, justice and good will? What would our parishes look like if they were part of such an organized country-wide effort? No, the church should not get directly involved in politics. But yes, we Catholics are spiritually responsible to use the grace of Christmas to elevate and correct our society by making it more peaceful and just, more of good will and more effectively fostering the common good — in sum, more luminously human. This is the spiritual work that Christmas calls us and empowers us to do. This is the work we have to learn how to do. It is time to bring the full meaning of Christmas peace, justice and good will — the meaning of Christ with us and among us — to our society. Anthony T. Massimini of Woolwich holds a doctorate in spiritual theology. He can be reached at massimini7@gmail.com
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/Spiritual Life
Author:Ronald Rolheiser
Several years ago, a Presbyterian minister I know challenged his congregation to open its doors and its heart more fully to the poor. The congregation initially responded with enthusiasm and a number of programs were introduced that actively invited people from the less-privileged economic areas of the city, including a number of street-people, to come their church. But the romance soon died as coffee cups and other loose items began to disappear, some handbags were stolen, and the church and meeting space were often left messy and soiled. A number of the congregation began to complain and demand an end to the experiment: “This isn’t what we expected! Our church isn’t clean and safe anymore! We wanted to reach out to these people and this is what we get! This is too messy to continue!” But the minister held his ground, pointing out that their expectations were naïve, that what they were experiencing was precisely part of the cost of reaching out to the poor, and that Jesus assures us that loving is unsafe and messy, not just in reaching out to the poor but in reaching out to anyone. We like to think of ourselves as gracious and loving, but, the truth be told, that is predicated on an overly-naïve and overly-romanticized notion of love. We don’t really love as Jesus invites us to when he says: Love each other as I have loved you! The tail-end of that sentence contains the challenge: Jesus doesn’t say, love each other according to the spontaneous movements of your heart; nor, love each other as society defines love, but rather: Love each other as I have loved you! And, for the most part, we haven’t done that: — We haven’t loved our enemies, nor turned the other cheek and reached out to embrace those who hate us. We haven’t prayed for those who oppose us. — We haven’t forgiven those who hurt us, nor forgiven those who have murdered our loved ones. We haven’t, in the midst of being hurt, asked God to forgive the very people who are hurting us because they are not really cognizant of what they are doing. — We haven’t been big-hearted and taken the high-road when we’ve been slighted or ignored, nor at those times have we let understanding and empathy replace bitterness and our desire to withdraw. We haven’t let go of our grudges. — We haven’t let ourselves be vulnerable to the point of risking humiliation and rejection in our offers of love. We haven’t given up our fear being misunderstood, of not looking good, of not appearing strong and in control. We haven’t set out barefooted, to love without security in our pockets. — We haven’t opened our hearts enough to imitate Jesus’ universal, non-discriminating embrace, nor have we been able to stretch our hearts to see everyone as brother or sister, regardless of race, color, or religion. We haven’t stopped nursing the silent secret that our own lives and the lives of our loved ones are more precious than those of the rest of the world. — We haven’t made a preferential option for the poor, haven’t brought the poor to our tables, and haven’t yet abandoned our propensity to be with the attractive and the influential. — We haven’t sacrificed ourselves fully to the point of losing everything for the sake of others. We haven’t ever really laid down our lives for our friends — nor, especially, for our enemies. We haven’t been willing to die for the very people who oppose us and are trying to crucify us. — We haven’t loved with pure intention in our hearts, without somehow seeking ourselves within our relationships. We haven’t let our hearts be broken rather than, however subtly, violate someone else. — We haven’t walked in patience, giving others the full space they need to relate to us according to their own inner dictates. We haven’t been willing to patiently sweat blood in order to be faithful. We haven’t waited in patience, in God’s good-time, for God’s judgment on right and wrong. — We haven’t resisted our natural urge to judge others, to not impute motives. We haven’t left judgment to God. — Finally, not least, we haven’t loved and forgiven own selves, knowing that no mistake we make stands between us and God. We haven’t trusted God’s love enough to always begin anew inside of God’s infinite mercy. — We haven’t loved as Jesus loved. After his wife, Raissa, died, Jacques Maritain edited a book of her journals. In the preface of that book he describes her struggle with the illness that eventually killed her. Severely debilitated and unable to speak, she struggled mightily in her last days. Her suffering both tested and matured Maritain’s own faith. Mightily sobered by seeing his wife’s sufferings, he wrote: Only two kinds of people think that love is easy: saints, who through long years of self-sacrifice have made a habit of virtue, and naïve persons who don’t know what they’re talking about. Oblate Father Ron Rolheiser is president of the Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, Texas. He can be contacted through his website www.ronrolheiser.com
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/Growing in Faith
Author:Michael M. Canaris
People of the Book - John of Patmos Christ claimed that he was in fact “the alpha and the omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last” (Rev 22:13). Because of this assertion, the A and the horseshoe-shaped Omega, the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet, are often displayed in Christian art, buildings, and pulpits. This series of articles investigating scriptural figures that share our theological DNA began many months ago with our first parents Adam and Eve and now closes with our own bookending omega-figure, the author of the last book of the Bible, called Revelation or the Apocalypse. This text has been ascribed to John of Patmos and is unique among biblical writings for a number of reasons. There are many Johns connected to the New Testament: the Baptist, the beloved disciple, the evangelist, the presbyter, the “seer.” Sometimes even biblical scholars disagree about which of these figures are in fact distinct individuals and which share common traits and writings. The official narrative is that John the evangelist was in fact the youngest of the disciples, so intimately close to Jesus that the former rested his head on Christ’s chest during the Last Supper. After Jesus’ death sentence, when the disciples scattered like sheep without a shepherd, John remained at the foot of the Cross and took Mary into his home in an act of spiritual adoption whereby she became the mother of all Christians (“Woman, behold your son…Son, behold your mother”). He then supposedly wrote the fourth Gospel and a few epistles, was eventually exiled to Patmos and after visions of the end times, wrote the Book of Revelation, peacefully dying in old age, the only apostle not to suffer martyrdom. In actual fact, historical reality may (as usual) not be quite so tidy. It is undeniable that the Gospel of John and Revelation are not stylistically similar in any discernable way, although this proves nothing, as for example Dante’s “Divine Comedy” and his “De Vulgari Eloquentia” are radically different works when it comes to style, goal and format. Authors can obviously employ various genres for a multitude of purposes and intended audiences, and this would presumably apply a fortiori to those figures given the special charism of divine inspiration. (For a wonderful theological and historical exploration of what it means for an informed and critically astute person to accept that God “breathed himself into” [in-spirare] the biblical texts, see Rick Gaillardetz’s book “By What Authority?”). However, the 4th century church historian Eusebius of Caesarea claims that the John recording his apocalyptic vision on Patmos in the last book of the Bible is not the same person that personally saw the crucifixion. Eusebius pointed to a passage which seems to imply that this John received the apostolic tradition and was not an original witness to the passion. The church father St. Jerome supported him in this opinion, while many historical and current theologians dispute the distinction, arguing that both came from the same pen. Either way, the Book of Revelation is one of the most mysterious and powerful texts of Christianity. Read through a literal and fundamentalist lens, it describes with terrifying detail the trials and tribulations surrounding Christ’s return, the end of the world, and the gory punishments extended to those who have become drowsy through the centuries with the intoxicating spirits of perceived independence from God. However, Catholics are not encouraged to read the text along these lines. Rather, Pope Benedict has pointed out that the images of triumphant lambs and women battling dragons portray not frightening snapshots of the destruction to come, but the “luminous side of history.” Christians believe the end of our individual and collective stories does not remain as pain or meaninglessness, but that the foundation of the universe is love, for as one of my favorite Pauline passages puts it, “he who called you is faithful” (1 Thess 5:24). As difficult as it is to accept when one is undergoing struggles, the pope reminds us that in Revelation we realize suffering “is never perceived as the last word, but is seen as one point in the passage to happiness and, in fact, is itself already mysteriously infused with the joy that flows from hope.” Michael M. Canaris of Collingswood is an administrator at Fairfield University’s Center for Faith and Public Life and is on the faculty for the Department of Philosophy, Theology, and Religious Studies at Sacred Heart University.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Opportunities for Youth and Young Adults
Author:Carmela Malerba
Theology on Tap for Young Adults, “For God’s Sake or Pete’s?: Reflections on a Relational God,” with Msgr. Roger McGrath, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Landmark Americana, Glassboro, $10 buffet. For more info call Greg Coogan, 856-583-6122. Knights of Columbus Councils 7463 and 7774 will hold a free throw contest for boys and girls ages 10 thru 14, Jan. 14 from 9 a.m. to noon at Christ the Redeemer Assumption Campus Hall, Atco. For info call Bob Hayes, 856-753-3095. St. Peter Christian Singles Club, Merchantville, has many scheduled events for January. Affiliate parishes: St. Stephen, Pennsauken; Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Maple Shade. Email: stpetersover21@yahoo.com or call club director, John Edelmayer, 856-663-3759 for more event information and the membership drive. St. Rose Young Adult Ministry (ages 18 to 40), Haddon Heights, meets Fridays from 7:30 to 8 p.m. followed by activity and socializing. For more information, email George, St.Rose.Yam@gmail.com, or see http://strose.hurricaneweb.net Knights of Columbus will hold their annual free throw championship, Jan. 14 at 1 p.m. in St. Joseph gymnasium, Somers Point. Pickup registration form at the school office or from the athletic director. Questions? Call Bob Lewis, 609-653-4867. Youth Ministry Program, Church of the Holy Family: Meetings, monthly Mass, dinners and service opportunities, retreats, group adventures and leadership programs. For more information contact Julie LaRosa, 856-228-2215 or jlarosa@churchoftheholyfamily.org (www.churchoftheholyfamily.org/jryouthreg for 5th and 6th grade program; www.churchoftheholyfamily.org/sryouthreg for high school program). Our Lady of Peace Parish, Williamstown, youth groups: junior, sixth to eighth grades; senior, ninth to 12th grades; young adults ages 18 to 25, ACTS. Contact Kari A. Janisse, work 856-629-6142, ext. 20, cell 973-534-8960, email youthministerkari@gmail.com, website www.YouthGroupInfo.com Divine Mercy Parish, Vineland, Young Youth Group for children in grades 3 to 6, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. second Friday of month, church hall. For more information, call Michael and Shirley Velazquez, 856-696-2241. Hearts of Fire, 7th and 8th grade youth program at Church of the Holy Family, Sewell, combines traditional material covered in religious education Confirmation class and takes it a step further. For more information contact Julie LaRosa, 856-228-2215 or jlarosa@churchoftheholyfamily.org
Friday, 06 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/On Behalf of Justice
Author:Father Robert J. Gregorio
Fifty years ago this October, the event of the century for the church began. Vatican II, following upon Vatican I of 1869-70, opened the windows under the leadership of good Pope John. His stated hope was that he and the council fathers, all 2,400 of them, would bring aggiornamento, or updating, to the community of Christ’s followers called Catholics. He had announced his grand plan in January of 1959, and church members and media alike buzzed with expectancy from the start. St. Peter’s Basilica would house the epic effort, only the 21st ecumenical council in our history. The medium of exchange would be spoken and written Latin. Teaching theology across town at the Gregorian University was Canadian Jesuit Father Bernard Lonergan. Well respected in his field, he side-stepped many of the projections about the meeting as it got under way. It gathered each autumn until 1965, before the world’s attention. While media and other commentators opined about things such as married priests, reviving the permanent diaconate, introducing the vernacular into worship, marriage law reform and many such controversies, he watched the hand of 19th century Anglican convert, Cardinal John Henry Newman, govern perhaps the greatest change as the council fathers recognized the New Testament teaching that the people are the church. We the people live in history. We are used to, if not totally accepting of, changes that occur in the secular areas of economics, society, diplomacy, not to mention what two recent world wars had done to life. Lonergan drew attention to two greatly differing world views becoming evident in and outside the church: the classicist and the historicist. The classicist way of viewing the church and the world sees reality as composed of unchanging, static values that have purposely remained fixed in place. It draws upon Plato’s conception of the world that he elucidated in “The Cave.” According to this, we humans are fated to sit, chained for all our lives, facing the wall of a cave. All we see is what is ahead of us: shadows cast upon the wall by real bodies out of our view, at the cave’s mouth. Our limited experiences compared to the real world of ideas which he postulated are weak as dreams compared to what really exists: unchanging realities. Concepts like “human nature” and “ethical behavior” and “natural law” rested on eternal foundation, accurate and true, and so could not be changed. To attempt to improve upon or otherwise adjust them would defy the Creator. Lesser things such as language or seasons could change, but not the bedrock concepts. God does not change. God is immutable. But the historicist way of viewing reality sees a dynamic evolution and development, notions that thinkers like Marx, Darwin and Freud had propounded. Those names alone would caution students of philosophy because of some of the changes they advanced. Could people forcibly redistribute wealth in the name of fairness? Could humans evolve from simian life forms in spite of Genesis? Could strong psychosexual energy be posited in humans, made in God’s image? The study of comparative religions convincingly showed worldwide throughout history that religions along with their cultural matrixes have changed, ours included. We Catholics now outlaw slavery: Pope John Paul II called it intrinsically evil. But there was a time fairly recently when we saw it as moral if distasteful. We no longer burn heretics at the stake. But we used to, with full ecclesiastical approval. We once prohibited taking even a half percent of interest on a loan, until the rise of capitalism and its argument that the lender should be compensated for risking not getting full or timely return. Even the ancient Israelites noticed that early in their history as a people, monogamy replaced polygamy. Jacob, also called Israel, legitimately had 13 sons and a daughter by four women. The discerning mind concludes that church leaders, whether at Vatican II or long before, would be bound to maintain central tenets of the faith while retiring lesser practices as no longer serving the church. Remember how our present pope retired the theologians’ postulation of Limbo? What is basic stays. What only seems basic can be retired. Here was the basis for most of the liberal-conservative friction during and since Vatican II: traditionalists object to the lessening of the importance of Latin in the Mass, thinking that this is what united Catholics worldwide. But councils have participants from everywhere, even places where they had never used Latin at their Masses.
Thursday, 12 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/That All May Be One
Author:Father Joseph D. Wallace
I am convinced that one of the best ways to avoid the ignorance of stereotypes and prejudice is for people of different backgrounds and faiths to get to know one another by spending quality time together that often leads to friendship and greater understanding. I grew up in a neighborhood and Catholic culture here in South Jersey that pretty much insulated many of us from meeting people of other faiths or different racial backgrounds. These segregated experiences can often lead to false generalizations or misrepresentations, fear and prejudice. Fortunately, during high school I began working at the Lafayette Hotel in Atlantic City which became a kosher establishment shortly after I was employed. I made some friendships there that endure to this day and that have taught me more than anything I read in a book or heard in a lecture about Jews and Judaism. Working alongside mostly Jewish and African American coworkers I also learned what it means to be in the minority! Those friendships and experiences opened my heart and mind to the quest of bringing people together for greater understanding and bonds of unity. It was with sadness that I read the other week of the death of Jerzy Kluger, the Jewish boyhood friend of the late Pope John Paul II. Kluger, who was 90, died in Rome at the San Camillo Hospital on New Year’s Eve of complications from bronchitis and was buried in Rome’s Jewish cemetery. He had been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and had been living in a home for the elderly in Rome. In the Polish town of Wadowice the pope and Jerzy met as young boys in the 1920s. Their friendship was somewhat unusual. Karol Wojtyla came from a deeply Catholic family and Jerzy Kluger from an observant Jewish family. Jerzy and the pope knew each other by their boyhood nicknames, Jurek and Lolek. They met in grade school, played soccer in the streets and did homework together. Jerzy, who eventually became an engineer, let the young Karol see his math homework; the future pope let Jurek copy his Latin exercises. Once Jerzy had entered a church in Wadowice to wait for a friend, and a woman rudely reproached him because he was Jewish and had come into a Catholic church. Karol defended Jerzy, saying, “Aren’t we all God’s children?” They lost track of one another when the Second World War broke out with the invasion of Poland in 1939. Jerzy was arrested by the Russians and was sent to a gulag in Siberia along with his father. After Germany invaded the Soviet Union, Jerzy was freed and he and his father fought against the Germans, enlisting in the famous Anders Brigade, which picked up Polish exiles who fought alongside the Allied forces and took part in the pivotal battle of Monte Cassino just south of Rome. Toward the end of the war, when he discovered that his mother, sister and many other family members had been killed in the Auschwitz death camp, he decided to stay in Italy. Jerzy married a Catholic woman from Ireland, settled in Rome and started a business importing heavy equipment. The two old friends reunited in 1965 in Italy when Archbishop Karol Wojtyla was in Rome for the Second Vatican Council. Prior to this meeting in Rome both had assumed that the other had died during the war. After John Paul was elected pope in 1978, he stunned the world by granting his first papal audience to Jerzy and his family. When asked about how his ties with the pope could deepen relations between Catholics, Jews and Israel, Jerzy said, “The people in the Vatican do not know Jews and previous popes did not know Jews, but this pope is a friend of the Jewish people. He grew up in Wadowice.” Pope John Paul and Jerzy Kluger deepened their friendship over the years. Jerzy helped organize reunions between the pope and classmates from Wadowice either in Rome or during the pope’s trips to Poland. Jerzy joined Pope John Paul when he made his historic visit to Rome’s synagogue in 1986 and called Jews “our beloved elder brothers.” When the pope made his first trip to Israel in 2000, Jerzy joined him and was in attendance at the Yad Vashem memorial to the Holocaust gathering. Their friendship continued right up to the pope’s death in 2005. Here in the Diocese of Camden we have opportunities throughout the year to attend the various classes, symposiums, prayer services and other gatherings offered by the Office of Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. It is at these gatherings that you can meet and perhaps even become friends with local Jews, Muslims and people of other religions. Stay tuned for information announcing these opportunities. Father Joseph D. Wallace is coordinator, Ecumenical and Inter-religious Affairs, Diocese of Camden.
Thursday, 12 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/A Pastoral Message
Author:Monsignor Thomas J. Morgan
At this time of year, I am generally more reflective and meditative than any other period of the year. I become more keenly aware of the journey I embrace and the challenges along the way. I can dream of the good things that are still to come. At this time of the year, I find it easy to remember the loved ones I have lost. I can easily pray for those who died for our safety and freedom this past year. It is the season when it is easier to forgive and forget. It is the season to extend a helping hand to those in need. It is the season to be thankful for our blessings. This is the ideal season to get a new perspective on things. Even in the midst of the demands and distractions, the bigger picture seems to unravel. It is the season to review the past year. It is the ideal time to focus on the present and its preciousness It is the time to prepare with hope for the future that is ultimately in God’s providence. For me the year 2011 was not the best of years and it was not the worst of years. It was rather an unsettling year on many fronts. As a believer, I can say it was what God gave us. Moreover, in a real sense, it was what we made of it. The year 2011 was a time when almost everyone was stressed out over almost everything. It seemed almost everyone was getting into the victimization thing. Ordinary things for many were becoming too much to bear. In 2011, some were caving in to the idea and belief that things were too much to bear. Things seemed terribly out of whack. Some experienced that things seemed terribly unfair, and overly difficult. In 2011, there were so many distractions. Troubles seemed overwhelming. It was so easy to become anxious. It was so easy to be worried about the future. At times discouragement and despair were all around us. In 2011, our retirement savings were slowly coming back. Home prices were slowly coming back. The cash infusion was slowly beginning to work. Unemployment continued to be troublesome. In 2011, poverty was still widespread. Drug abuse was still rampant. Homelessness continued to be a problem. The food warehouses were half-empty. The donations and supplies were inadequate. The growing needs were increasing. Hopelessness was still widespread. Even with the withdraw from Iraq; the war situation still looked bleak and barren. Therefore, for many obvious reasons, we want to enter upon this new phase of our lives with hope. That is what it is to be a Christian and to be a believer. We face the new phase on the journey with hope. At the beginning of the New Year, we want to settle into the realization that God is with us. We want to sink into the conviction that God has entered into our time. God has taken up a dwelling with us. His Son has come as a man. “God sent his son, born of a woman” (Gal. 4:6). At the beginning of this New Year, we come to realize that God has entered into the fears and tensions of all of our lives. He has given our mortal nature immortal value. There is a new oneness with God and us. An integral part of our pilgrimage in this New Year is to find God. Better imagery is to allow God to find us. We make that mutual discovery in the midst of our messy lives. We make that encounter in the midst of our messy world. The desire for God is planted in our hearts. This desire is sometimes contaminated on the journey. The desire becomes clouded. Yet, it is our deepest desire. Yet it is our deepest need as we travel to our true home. St. Augustine would say, “Our hearts are restless until they rest in God.” Msgr. Thomas J. Morgan is pastor of St. Mary and St. Thomas More parishes, Cherry Hill.
Thursday, 12 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Holy Redeemer HomeCare, which serves 11 New Jersey counties including Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Ocean and Salem, has been named to the HomeCare Elite, a national ranking of the top 25 percent of home health care agencies. The annual HomeCare Elite analysis has become an industry standard for recognizing organizational performance and success in the home care market. For more information call 1-800-818-4747 or visit us on the web at www.holyredeemer.com
Thursday, 12 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:D.A. Barsotti
                    The Barsotti family takes a hike on the Great Wall of China.   A new year. A pretty new calendar. The one on the refrigerator features scenic landscapes from around the United States. Imagine the vast potential of a month that is poised on the edge of the Grand Canyon. Ah Janus, the god of open gates and new beginnings.... Before I make one mark, before I chart one doctor’s appointment, before I even fill in the birthdays of my special someones, I thumb through the 12 scenes. Memories rise to the surface as I recognize some of these images. Our sons were young when we visited the Grand Canyon, but their strong legs and unlimited energy made them good hikers. Nevertheless, the footpath of the Bright Angel Trail seemed very narrow and we kept them at close range as we hugged the canyon’s walls. It was exhilarating to level off below the rim — on a plateau suspended somewhere between heaven and whatever lay far below. I remember that after the hike, we attended a Saturday vigil Mass right there at the visitor’s center. Mother Nature and the architect of that building must have worked the blueprints together, creating a backdrop that was more inspiring than any cathedral I had ever visited. Reflected in the eyes of those worshipping alongside of us was an appreciation for the natural grandeur; the wonder at humanity’s minuteness; and a marvel at the hand of God. It was hard to leave that sacred space after the liturgy. It provided a bittersweet moment for us, too — we were leaving for home the next morning. That’s the one memory that still brings a little shiver to this mom. As we were heading into the airport terminal that morning, my son was walking too close to the edge of the sidewalk and slipped off the curb. No blood drawn; no damage done. But it made me realize that we were in the hands of the angels on the canyon trail. We’ve done quite a bit of traveling, but still, I don’t recognize all of the images on my new calendar. The vistas are so enticing that I feel like heading right to the library for a stack of guidebooks to plan our next vacation. Perhaps the year won’t hold enough weeks, or the piggy bank enough savings, to travel to places too far away. Maybe we won’t jet off to Rome — but we could easily schedule a long weekend in Washington, D.C. There we could visit the Franciscan Monastery to see a replica of Rome’s Catacombs at Mount St. Sepulcher — The Holy Land of America. And maybe we won’t venture too far west. Instead of a much-desired return to Arizona, maybe we could explore the smaller but still fascinating Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania, a place where it’s easy to explore both the rim and the floor of the smaller-scaled canyon. Perhaps there will be a family gathering this year that will take us out of our backyard. Could we schedule some time for exploring the mountains of North Carolina after the celebration of a nephew’s graduation? Could we go visit family in another state and let them show us around? Could we plan day trips? Maybe go into the city — and ride the “Ducks” (those amphibious tour vehicles that traverse the city’s streets and waterways.) Maybe we could even pull out the tent! Maybe this will be the year to seek the Northern Lights, or peace and quiet, or another natural phenomenon. My new calendar gives me a chance to start dreaming. And to start planning. Our sons are now married, and we have grandchildren. Intergenerational travel has become a reality. A family trip to Disney World, a weekend in New York City, and a springtime Sunday at Longwood Gardens. Somehow the stars lined up and we were able to be together in our near and far explorations. Last year’s epic journey took us, with our grandsons, to China. Ah, the memories we will always share. Along with our scenic new calendar, we’ve added new travel books to our bookshelves, including “500 Places to See Before They Disappear” (Frommer, 2011) and “Rail-Trails Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York,” a regional guide to family-friendly multi-purpose trails. The season for dreaming and planning is now open. What a wonderful New Year’s resolution. Let’s fill these months with safe and happy travels!
Thursday, 12 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report


Page 118 of 212


Powered by AlphaContent 4.0.14 © 2005-2014 - All rights reserved
Yenilenen altyapisiyla yepyeni bir porno sitesi istiyorsaniz bizim siteye ugramanizi tavsiye ederiz.
Copyright © 2014 Catholic Star Herald | Site Designed by the Diocese of Camden.
Login