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Kevin Hickey, executive director for Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Camden; Jennifer Dyer, assistant director; and board president Father Thomas Newton, with Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, Archbishop Emeritus of Washington, are pictured at the National Press Club during a two-day Catholic Charities event in Washington, D.C. Oct. 13-14. Leaders of Catholic Charities agencies from Hawaii, to the Virgin Islands, including representatives from the Diocese of Camden, gathered in Washington, D.C. for a two-day event, highlighting their organizations’ commitment to substantive poverty reduction. On Oct. 13, 150 Catholic Charities directors, board members, and staff gathered at the National Press Club for dinner and a discussion, moderated by the National Journal’s Major Garrett, on innovative poverty reduction strategies. The following day, attendees were welcomed to the Eisenhower Executive Office Building by Melody Barnes, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council. The morning session touched on a wide array of topics, from jobs and the economy, the Affordable Care Act and its implementation, immigration, military families, and religious freedom. After a tour of the White House, the program concluded with breakout sessions delving into policy topics.
Thursday, 27 October 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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The Catechism of the Catholic Church provides clear guidance on End of Life Issues: 2276 Those whose lives are diminished or weakened deserve special respect. Sick or handicapped persons should be helped to lead lives as normal as possible. 2277 Whatever its motives and means, direct euthanasia consists in putting an end to the lives of handicapped, sick, or dying persons. It is morally unacceptable. Thus an act or omission which, of itself or by intention, causes death in order to eliminate suffering constitutes a murder gravely contrary to the dignity of the human person and to the respect due to the living God, his Creator. The error of judgment into which one can fall in good faith does not change the nature of this murderous act, which must always be forbidden and excluded. 2278 Discontinuing medical procedures that are burdensome, dangerous, extraordinary, or disproportionate to the expected outcome can be legitimate; it is the refusal of “over-zealous” treatment. Here one does not will to cause death; one’s inability to impede it is merely accepted. The decisions should be made by the patient if he is competent and able or, if not, by those legally entitled to act for the patient, whose reasonable will and legitimate interests must always be respected. 2279 Even if death is thought imminent, the ordinary care owed to a sick person cannot be legitimately interrupted. The use of painkillers to alleviate the sufferings of the dying, even at the risk of shortening their days, can be morally in conformity with human dignity if death is not willed as either an end or a means, but only foreseen and tolerated as inevitable. Palliative care is a special form of disinterested charity. As such it should be encouraged. From Advance Directives for Health Care: A Catholic Perspective
Thursday, 27 October 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
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Camden Volunteers for this year (2011-12) gather for a photo with Father Michael McCue of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Camden; Sister Helen Cole, Holy Name of Camden Ministries; and Kevin Moran, volunteer support. The Camden Volunteers consist of Franciscan Volunteers, Jesuit Volunteers, DeSales Service Works and Action Reconciliation Service for Peace (from Germany). The young people, all recent college graduates, make a commitment to social justice by living in the city for one or two years and working in church ministries. They are pictured before a commissioning Mass Oct. 17 at DeSales Service Works, 522 State Street.
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Front Page of Newspaper/Latest Front Page Images
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Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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St. Luke’s Catholic Medical Services, where Violeta Olavarria — one of the women honored Holy Name of Camden Ministries dinner in Tavistock on Oct. 25 — has worked since its opening, is a private medical practice that provides a full range of medical and health services for the poor, uninsured and under-insured. St. Luke’s services are predominantly to the Hispanic community of Camden City, but are available to all. “We are committed to giving quality, compassionate, medical and health services to our patients on a 24 hour basis. We serve our patients through office visits, and health education and prevention programs,” St. Luke’s states on the website for Holy Name of Camden Ministires (holynameofcamdenministries.org). Dr. Lesly D’Ambola, D.O. is the medical director. The full-time staff includes a registered nurse health educator, certified medical assistants, an office manager and receptionists. St. Luke’s is affiliated with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - School of Medicine and also receives support from the Diocese of Camden and the Holy Name of Camden Ministries. Founded in 1983 by Jesuit Father Mark Aita, a physician, St. Luke’s delivers health care to more than 7,000 patients visits a year.
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Photo by James A. McBride In left photo, worshippers hold images of Mary at the blessing of the Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine at St. Lawrence Church, Lindenwold, on Sunday, Oct. 30. In 1531 Mary appeared four times to Juan Diego, a poor Indian, on Tepeyac Hill outside modern-day Mexico City and instructed him to tell the bishop she wanted a church built at the site. The bishop complied with the request after being convinced of the genuineness of the apparition by the evidence of a life-size image of Mary, which miraculously appeared on the saint’s outer garment. In 1754 Pope Benedict XIV declared Dec. 12 as the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe. She was later designated patroness of the Americas. Pope John Paul II canonized Juan Diego in Mexico City. His feast day is Dec. 9. The Guadalupe image, which continues to baffle scientists, is now the most recognizable religious symbol in Latin America, and devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe is a favorite of Catholics throughout the Americas. The Guadalupe icon has been adopted by numerous causes, including the pro-life movement, which entrusts the unborn to the pregnant Madonna’s protection. Mexico City’s Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, where the saint’s tilma is enshrined, is the most visited Marian shrine in the world, according to the Apostolate for Holy Relics.
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Photos by Alan M. Dumoff Juliet Njoku, member of the Black Catholic Ministry Commission, Diocese of Camden, was the cantor for the sixth annual Mass in the African traditions, celebrated Saturday, Oct. 22, at St. Michael Church, Atlantic City. Left, Msgr. Leonard Scott offers the chalice to Bishop Joseph Galante. Bishop Joseph Galante presided at the sixth annual Mass in the African traditions, celebrated Saturday, Oct. 22, at St. Michael Church, Atlantic City. Msgr. Leonard Scott, pastor of Emmaus Catholic Community and member of the Black Catholic Ministry Commission, concelebrated with a number of African priests from the Camden Diocese and the archdioceses of Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia. They were assisted by Deacon Vincent Okoro and Deacon William Johnson. The congregants were welcomed by Father Jeffery Cesarone, administrator. Before the Mass, children and adults from the Akwaaba Prayer Group headed by Rachel Beugre of St. Josephine Bakhita Parish, Camden, performed a hallowing of the space. During this African tradition, children dressed as evil spirits were cast out of the sanctuary before the Mass began. The Mass began with a processional hymn sung by Nigerian singers and Sisters of the Holy Child Jesus (from Bryn Mawr, Pa.) and led by Juliet Njoku of the Black Catholic Ministry Commission. Representatives of Haiti, Nigeria, Liberia, Cote D'Ivoire and other countries read the prayers of the faithful. Parts of the Mass were sung by the combined choirs of St. Monica's Parish in Atlantic City. Music was also provided by the Liberian community. The Mass also included a thanksgiving procession. This African tradition of offering the harvest of the first fruits through the ancestors was explained by Ugandan priest Father Alfred Onyutha. Representatives of Nigeria, Liberia, Cote D'Ivoire and Haiti were among those represented. “It was transformative to be in the presence of the Holy Spirit in this celebration featuring the colors, sounds, rhythms and the traditions of the African continent. My hope is that this beautiful celebration of the Holy Eucharist can be experienced more widely in our church,” said Corlis L. Sellers, associate director of Lifelong Faith Formation for Black Catholics and Liaison to the Bishop for the Black Catholic Ministry Commission.
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Church law provides the opportunity for those claiming to be aggrieved by a decree to seek recourse in accord with the Code of Canon Law. It should be noted that Church Law (canon 1733) urges that parties in any dispute be encouraged to seek reconciliation even if formal recourse has been initiated. Canons 1732 through 1739 identify the process for seeking recourse against administrative decrees and most other individual administrative acts if no solution is able to be negotiated. In this instance, in which Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante, on November 4, 2011, in accord with canon 515 §2, DECREED, ANNOUNCED and PUBLISHED the merger of The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer, 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart, 1010 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland; and the establishment of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish, the following process for seeking reconciliation and recourse against this decision is also published: 1. Before initiating formal recourse, a written petition from a person (canon 96) who considers himself or herself aggrieved by this decree must be directed to: Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante Camden Diocesan Center 631 Market Street Camden, New Jersey 08102 Fax: 856-338-0376 In this letter, the person must first seek relief by requesting revocation or amendment of this decree (canon 1734 §1). In this same letter, the person should supply their mailing address so that the Bishop may respond. This initial petition must be received within a time limit of ten (10) business days of the legal notification of this decree (canon 1734 §2). Bishop Galante directs that this decree is to be published in the diocesan newspaper the Catholic Star Herald on Friday, November 4, 2011, and announced at all weekend Masses in The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart on Saturday, November 5, 2011 and Sunday, November 6, 2011. Therefore, the obligation to present in writing a quest for revocation or amendment of this decree must be received by Bishop Galante’s office no later than 4:00 p.m., Monday, November 21, 2011. 2. Bishop Galante has a period of thirty days within which to respond to this petition for revocation or amendment (canon 1735). During this period of time, Bishop Galante may suspend the execution of this decree, or the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved may submit a special petition to the Congregation for the Clergy [see address below] for suspension of the execution of this decree (canon 1736). 3. In responding to the substance of the petition it is envisioned that Bishop Galante may take one of three courses of action (canon 1735): a. Bishop Galante may act in a way that satisfies the person who considers himself or herself to have been aggrieved. b. Bishop Galante, may, within thirty (30) days respond to the petition by either denying the request or issuing a new or amended decree that still leaves the person, who considers himself or herself aggrieved, dissatisfied. c. Bishop Galante may choose not to respond to the initial petition. In this instance, the time period for the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved to initiate formal recourse begins on the thirtieth day after the petition for revocation or amendment was submitted. 4. If the Bishop’s response leaves the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved still dissatisfied, then the author of the initial petition seeking revocation or amendment of this decree has fifteen (15) business days to initiate formal recourse to the Congregation for the Clergy (canon 1737 §2). 5. In this instance, the recourse is addressed to the Congregation for the Clergy. This can be submitted directly to the following address: Most Reverend Mauro Piacenza Secretary Congregation for the Clergy Piazza Pio XII 3 00193 Rome, Italy Or, through the office of the Apostolic Nunciature: Most Reverend Carlo Maria Viganò Apostolic Nuncio to the United States 3339 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20008-3610 Or, through the office of Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante: Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante Camden Diocesan Center 631 Market Street Camden, New Jersey 08102 Fax: 856-338-0376 Canon law requires that whoever receives the recourse to the Congregation for the Clergy must transmit it immediately (canon 1737 §1). If the author of the formal recourse sends it directly to the Congregation for the Clergy, Bishop Galante should be notified by theperson sending it to the Congregation that it has been filed. 6. The person making recourse against this decree has the right to engage the services of a canon lawyer (canon 1738). 7. If the Congregation for the Clergy does not act within three (3) consecutive months of receiving the recourse, canon law presumes that the response is negative (canon 57). If there has been no response within the three (3) months, or if the Congregation for the Clergy has issued a decision that leaves the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved still dissatisfied, then the person making the recourse has the right to make further recourse against the decision of the Congregation for the Clergy to the Apostolic Signatura within thirty (30) calendar days of the expiration of the three (3) month period, or thirty (30) calendar days from the receipt of the Congregation’s decision.
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Greetings In The Lord Among the most important responsibilities of the Bishop’s pastoral office is assurance that there is suitable provision of divine worship and Catholic community life for Christ’s faithful people who are committed to his care. At the same time the pastor of each parish needs to be able to satisfy without undue difficulty the parochial responsibilities assigned to him by his Bishop. The following just causes support the establishment of a consolidated parish in the Vineland area of Cumberland County, New Jersey: 1) to provide more effectively for the pastoral needs of the faithful of  the parish of The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer in Cumberland County, New Jersey and the parish of The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart in Cumberland County, New Jersey; 2) to assure the vitality of parish life in this area; 3) to provide for a better stewardship of resources; and, 4) to provide for the optimum use of clergy, religious, and lay personnel. For the reasons listed above as well as having worked together in a patient and cooperative manner to bring these faith communities into one Community of Faith; because of the communality of the parish communities of The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer, 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart, 1010 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland; in response to the request of the pastor of these communities, Reverend Monsignor John H. Burton, to unite these parishes; the favorable advice of the local Vicar Forane; and having listened to the opinions of the Presbyteral Council about the needs of the Catholic Faithful in this area of Cumberland County, I have determined that the pastoral care of these communities will be fostered best by consolidating these individual communities and uniting them as one new parish. Accordingly, in virtue of the prescripts of canon 121 and canon 515, §1 of the Code of Canon Law, in order to provide more effectively for the spiritual welfare and the salvation of souls, having judged that sufficiently just causes are present, and having consulted the Presbyteral Council in accord with canon 515, §2, I hereby DECREE, ANNOUNCE and PUBLISH: The merger of the The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer, 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart, 1010 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland and the establishment of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish. Reverend Monsignor John H. Burton will serve as the Pastor of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish for a term of six years commencing on the effective date of this decree. The parochial church of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish, which retains its proper title and the name The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer, is located at 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland, New Jersey. The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart will retain its own proper title and will be maintained as a worship site to be used by the merged community. The territorial boundaries of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish will be the same as the combined boundaries of the former parishes of The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart. The establishment of these parish boundaries is duly recorded at the Chancery Office of the Diocese of Camden, as: Start at the point where Forest Grove Rd intersects the Millville Branch of the Pennsylvania – Reading Seashore Railroad between West Blvd and East Blvd in Vineland. 1. East on Forest Grove Rd to Blue Bell Rd 2. South on Blue Bell Rd to Main Rd 3. South on Main Rd to Oak Ave 4. East on Oak Ave to Brewster Rd 5. South on Brewster Rd to Lincoln Ave 6. Southwest on Lincoln Ave to its point of intersection with the Vineland – Millville city limit 7. Northwest along the Vineland – Millville city limit to its point of intersection with the Pennsylvania – Reading Seashore Line 8. North along the Pennsylvania – Reading Seashore Line to its point of intersection with Forest Grove Rd (point of origin) 12.44 sq mi The goods and property of the parishes of The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer and of The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart, including their real estate and buildings, as well as their debts and obligations, shall be assigned to Christ the Good Shepherd Parish. Further, the voluntary offerings of the faithful, as well as other grants, pledges and gifts which have been or will be made to either of these predecessor parishes will constitute revenue to Christ the Good Shepherd Parish for the benefit of the pastoral life of this community of the faithful as well as the rightful support of those who minister to them. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the sacramental registers of The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer, 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart, 1010 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland will be closed and moved to the seat of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish, 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland. All sacraments administered from that date forward will be recorded in new sacramental registers of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish. I approve the statutes of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish as submitted. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the financial accounts of The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer, 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart, 1010 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland will have been closed and transferred to the financial account of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish. As of the effective date of this DECREE, The Church of Saint Isidore the Farmer, 1655 Magnolia Road, Vineland and The Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart, 1010 E. Landis Avenue, Vineland will be civilly consolidated under the laws of the State of New Jersey as Christ the Good Shepherd Parish, Vineland, N.J. This DECREE becomes effective on December 7, 2011. I instruct that this DECREE be communicated immediately to the parishioners of Christ the Good Shepherd Parish by Reverend Monsignor John H. Burton whom I have herein named their Pastor. This DECREE is likewise to be published immediately in the Catholic Star Herald and on the diocesan website. Given in Camden, on this 4th day of November, 2011, at the Diocesan Center. Joseph A. Galante Bishop of Camden In cujus fidem… Robert E. Hughes Chancellor
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Church law provides the opportunity for those claiming to be aggrieved by a decree to seek recourse in accord with the Code of Canon Law. It should be noted that Church Law (canon 1733) urges that parties in any dispute be encouraged to seek reconciliation even if formal recourse has been initiated. Canons 1732 through 1739 identify the process for seeking recourse against administrative decrees and most other individual administrative acts if no solution is able to be negotiated. In this instance, in which Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante, on November 4, 2011, in accord with canon 515 §2, DECREED, ANNOUNCED and PUBLISHED the merger of the Church of the Transfiguration, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood and The Immaculate Heart of Mary, 201 Cooper Street, Woodlynne and the establishment of Most Precious Blood Parish, the following process for seeking reconciliation and recourse against this decision is also published: 1. Before initiating formal recourse, a written petition from a person (canon 96) who considers himself or herself aggrieved by this decree must be directed to: Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante Camden Diocesan Center 631 Market Street Camden, New Jersey 08102 Fax: 856-338-0376 In this letter, the person must first seek relief by requesting revocation or amendment of this decree (canon 1734 §1). In this same letter, the person should supply their mailing address so that the Bishop may respond. This initial petition must be received within a time limit of ten (10) business days of the legal notification of this decree (canon 1734 §2). Bishop Galante directs that this decree is to be published in the diocesan newspaper the Catholic Star Herald on Friday, November 4, 2011, and announced at all weekend Masses in the Church of the Transfiguration and The Immaculate Heart of Mary on Saturday, November 5, 2011 and Sunday, November 6, 2011. Therefore, the obligation to present in writing a request for revocation or amendment of this decree must be received by Bishop Galante’s office no later than 4:00 p.m., Monday, November 21, 2011. 2. Bishop Galante has a period of thirty days within which to respond to this petition for revocation or amendment (canon 1735). During this period of time, Bishop Galante may suspend the execution of this decree, or the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved may submit a special petition to the Congregation for the Clergy [see address below] for suspension of the execution of this decree (canon 1736). 3. In responding to the substance of the petition it is envisioned that Bishop Galante may take one of three courses of action (canon 1735): a. Bishop Galante may act in a way that satisfies the person who considers himself or herself to have been aggrieved. b. Bishop Galante, may, within thirty (30) days respond to the petition by either denying the request or issuing a new or amended decree that still leaves the person, who considers himself or herself aggrieved, dissatisfied. c. Bishop Galante may choose not to respond to the initial petition. In this instance, the time period for the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved to initiate formal recourse begins on the thirtieth day after the petition for revocation or amendment was submitted. 4. If the Bishop’s response leaves the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved still dissatisfied, then the author of the initial petition seeking revocation or endment of this decree has fifteen (15) business days to initiate formal recourse to the Congregation for the Clergy (canon 1737 §2). 5. In this instance, the recourse is addressed to the Congregation for the Clergy. This can be submitted directly to the following address: His Eminence Mauro Cardinal Piacenza Secretary Congregation for the Clergy Piazza Pio XII 3 00193 Rome, Italy Or, through the office of the Apostolic Nunciature: Most Reverend Carlo Maria Viganò. Apostolic Nuncio to the United States 3339 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20008-3610 Or, through the office of Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante: Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante Camden Diocesan Center 631 Market Street Camden, New Jersey 08102 Fax: 856-338-0376 Canon law requires that whoever receives the recourse to the Congregation for the Clergy must transmit it immediately (canon 1737 §1). If the author of the formal recourse sends it directly to the Congregation for the Clergy, Bishop Galante should be notified by the person sending it to the Congregation that it has been filed. 6. The person making recourse against this decree has the right to engage the services of a canon lawyer (canon 1738). 7. If the Congregation for the Clergy does not act within three (3) consecutive months of receiving the recourse, canon law presumes that the response is negative (canon 57). If there has been no response within the three (3) months, or if the Congregation for the Clergy has issued a decision that leaves the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved still dissatisfied, then the person making the recourse has the right to make further recourse against the decision of the Congregation for the Clergy to the Apostolic Signatura within thirty (30) calendar days of the expiration of the three (3) month period, or thirty (30) calendar days from the receipt of the Congregation’s decision.
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Greetings In The Lord Among the most important responsibilities of the Bishop’s pastoral office is assurance that there is suitable provision of divine worship and Catholic community life for Christ’s faithful people who are committed to his care. At the same time the pastor of each parish needs to be able to satisfy without undue difficulty the parochial responsibilities assigned to him by his Bishop. The following just causes support the establishment of a consolidated parish in the West Collingswood and Woodlynne areas of Camden County, New Jersey: 1) to provide more effectively for the pastoral needs of the faithful of the parish of the Church of the Transfiguration in Camden County, New Jersey and the parish of The Immaculate Heart of Mary in Camden County, New Jersey; 2) to assure the vitality of parish life in this area; 3) to provide for a better stewardship of resources; and, 4) to provide for the optimum use of clergy, religious, and lay personnel. For the reasons listed above as well as the experience of the faith communities of Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish and Transfiguration Parish having been drawn by the Holy Spirit into one Community of Faith; because of the communality of the parish communities of the Church of the Transfiguration, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood and The Immaculate Heart of Mary, 201 Cooper Street, Woodlynne; in response to the request of the pastors of these communities, Reverend Richard J. Lodge (Church of the Transfiguration, West Collingswood) and Reverend Joseph An Nguyen (The Immaculate Heart of Mary, Woodlynne) to unite these parishes; the favorable advice of the local Vicar Forane; and having listened to the opinions of the Presbyteral Council about the needs of the Catholic Faithful in this area of Camden County, I have determined that the pastoral care of these communities will be fostered best by consolidating these individual communities and uniting them as one new parish. Accordingly, in virtue of the prescripts of canon 121 and canon 515, §1 of the Code of Canon Law, in order to provide more effectively for the spiritual welfare and the salvation of souls, having judged that sufficiently just causes are present, and having consulted the Presbyteral Council in accord with canon 515, §2, I hereby DECREE, ANNOUNCE and PUBLISH: The merger of the Church of the Transfiguration, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood and The Immaculate Heart of Mary, 201 Cooper Street, Woodlynne and the establishment of Most Precious Blood Parish. Reverend Joseph An Nguyen will serve as the Pastor of Most Precious Blood Parish for a term of six years commencing on the effective date of this decree. The parochial church of Most Precious Blood Parish, which retains its proper title and the name the Church of the Transfiguration, is located at 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood, New Jersey. The territorial boundaries of Most Precious Blood Parish will be the same as the combined boundaries of the former parishes of the Church of the Transfiguration and The Immaculate Heart of Mary. The establishment of these parish boundaries is duly recorded at the Chancery Office of the Diocese of Camden, as: Start at the point Mt. Ephraim Ave intersects the North Branch of the Newton Creek 1. North on Mt. Ephraim Ave to Ferry Ave 2. East on Ferry Ave to Hollowell Ln 3. North on Hollowell Ln to Sayr Ave 4. East on Sayre Ave to Davis St 5. North on Davis St to Copewood St 6. East on Copewood St to the PATCO High Speed Line 7. East along the PATCO High Speed Line to Ferry Ave 8. East on Ferry Ave to Haddon Ave 9. East on Haddon Ave by way of the underpass to Crescent Blvd (US 130) 10. North on Crescent Blvd to the point it intersects the Cooper River 11. East on the Cooper River to the point it intersects the imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend Browning Rd 12. South on the imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend Browning Rd, then Browning Rd, then the imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend Browning Rd to the point it intersects Newton Lake 13. West along Newton Lake to the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Line 14. North on the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Line to the North Branch of the Newton Creek 15. West on the North Branch of the Newton Creek to Mt. Ephraim Ave (point of origin) Most Precious Blood Parish is established as the territorial parish within the municipal boundaries of the City of Woodlynne and the boundaries of the former Parish of the Transfiguration in West Collingswood; and is also simultaneously established as the personal parish for the Vietnamese Community in the Diocese of Camden, according to the norm of canon 518. The goods and property of the parishes of the Church of the Transfiguration and of The Immaculate Heart of Mary, including their real estate and buildings, as well as their debts and obligations, shall be assigned to Most Precious Blood Parish. Further, the voluntary offerings of the faithful, as well as other grants, pledges and gifts which have been or will be made to either of these predecessor parishes will constitute revenue to Most Precious Blood Parish for the benefit of the pastoral life of this community of the faithful as well as the rightful support of those who minister to them. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the sacramental registers of the Church of the Transfiguration, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood and The Immaculate Heart of Mary, 201 Cooper Street, Woodlynne will be closed and moved to the seat of Most Precious Blood Parish, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood. All sacraments administered from that date forward will be recorded in new sacramental registers of Most Precious Blood Parish. I approve the statutes of Most Precious Blood Parish as submitted. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the financial accounts of the Church of the Transfiguration, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood and The Immaculate Heart of Mary, 201 Cooper Street, Woodlynne will have been closed and transferred to the financial account of Most Precious Blood Parish. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the Church of the Transfiguration, 445 White Horse Pike, West Collingswood and The Immaculate Heart of Mary, 201 Cooper Street, Woodlynne will be civilly consolidated under the laws of the State of New Jersey as Most Precious Blood Parish, West Collingswood, N.J. This DECREE becomes effective on December 7, 2011. I instruct that this DECREE be communicated immediately to the parishioners of Most Precious Blood Parish by Reverend Joseph An Nguyen whom I have herein named their Pastor. This DECREE is likewise to be published immediately in the Catholic Star Herald and on the diocesan website. Given in Camden, on this 4th day of November 2011, at the Diocesan Center. Joseph A. Galante Bishop of Camden In cujus fidem… Robert E. Hughes Chancellor
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Thursday, 10 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
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Leah Darrow, once a contestant on “America’s Next Top Model” and now a Catholic speaker, will speak on Thursday, Nov. 17, 7 p.m., at Infant Jesus Parish, St. Margaret’s Church in Woodbury. Darrow, the self-professed “prodigal daughter,” was born in Oklahoma to a Catholic family that would say the rosary every night. During high school and college, she began what she described as a “slow fade” away from her faith, and appeared on the hit reality TV show, “America’s Next Top Model.” Her life changed after a photo shoot and now she travels the country telling her conversion story, while working as a full-time staff member at Catholic Answers in the apologetics and chastity departments. The event is open to the public. For more information, contact Jessica Fahy, Youth Minister at Infant Jesus Parish, at 856-304-3013, or at www.theinfantjesusyouthgroup@comcast.net
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Sister Margaret Mary Schmicker, OSF, who served at St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral in East Camden for more than 20 years, died on All Saints’ Day, Nov. 1, in Mount Vernon, N.Y. Sister was born in Upper Darby, Pa., daughter of the late Mary M. and John R. Schmicker. She is survived and mourned by her sister, Janet Schmicker, her good friend, Nancy Schwartz, the Sisters of St. Francis, and the parishioners of St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral. Sister was in the 62nd year of her religious life and had spent the last 22 years of her life serving the people of St. Joseph Pro- Cathedral Parish. Donations in her memory may be made to Joseph’s House, 20 Church St. Camden, NJ 08105. Joseph House offers shelter to those who are homeless in Camden.
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On Nov. 3 and 7, the Lifelong Faith Formation program at St. Joseph Parish in Somers Point held an intergenerational event showcasing the saints, with religious education students and their families making the “Trail To Sainthood” and walking through different stations at the church, and learning about and dining with the saints, who were depicted by the Lifelong Faith Formation Team and parishioners. Each saint explained who they were and how they lived in their time. Left photo, the disciples Peter and Andrew were fishemen (who were told by Jesus they would be “fishers of men”), so St. Peter (Ed Deeney) gives a fishing lesson. Right, Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta (Anne Marie Gibbs) leads a procession of saints.
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Photos by Alan M. Dumoff Workmen take down the statue of Our Lady of Lourdes from the top of Lourdes Medical Center on Thursday, Nov. 3, to repair damage from this summer’s earthquake. Left, the 30-foot, 15-ton statue had been secured with scaffolding since the Aug. 23 earthquake. Center and right, a section of the statue is removed. CAMDEN — The statue of Our Lady of Lourdes, a South Jersey landmark that has stood high atop Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center since 1949, was safely taken down Nov. 3 to repair damage from this summer’s earthquake. The Aug. 23 earthquake caused sections of the 30-foot, 15-ton statue to shift several inches, causing chipping and a number of vertical cracks. For several months, the statue has been secured with scaffolding as the engineering team determined the best way to approach the task. Last week, the statue’s top three sections were removed and brought down for repairs and conservation. “The statue has been with us for so many years, it is very sad to see her go today,” said Sister Helen Owens, OSF, vice president of Mission for Lourdes Health System. “Although she will not be physically present, the Blessed Mother remains with us.” The work to be done on the Our Lady of Lourdes statue is extensive and includes everything from carving and installing new limestone using stainless steel dowels and epoxy to drilling interior holes to install additional tensioning bars and anchors for additional structural support. The sections remaining on the building also will be improved. Made of Indiana limestone, the statue stands 185 feet above street level and is illuminated by flood lights at her base. Above her head, a 3-foot, 1,000 pound halo lit by amber neon lights served as a beacon for passing aircrafts for decades, flashing on and off from dusk to dawn. It also is lit for special occasions, such as for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October. Assembled in six sections, she is one of the largest such statues in the country. During its early construction, a cable holding the top of the head snapped. A beam went flying across the tower and the head teetered on the parapet – at risk of falling seven stories and smashing to the ground. As a result, the hospital’s first administrator, Sister Mary Paracleta, wrote a note and placed it inside the head asking Our Lady of Lourdes to protect the city and its residents. The note was sewn into X-ray film to protect it. Bishop Bartholomew J. Eustace, who headed the Diocese of Camden from 1937-56, placed a small relic of St. Francis inside the head. The costs to repair this historical statue far exceed what is covered by insurance. To help with these out-of-pocket expenses, Lourdes Health Foundation has established the Our Lady Fund for those who would like to donate to help save Our Lady of Lourdes. “We are asking the community to contribute to the preservation of this iconic area landmark. She is an important part of our community and the symbol of hope and light to many throughout the region. This repair will allow us to enjoy her for many more years to come,” said Ruth Cila, executive director of the Lourdes Health Foundation. To help save the Our Lady of Lourdes statue, make a donation via online at: http://www.lourdesnet.org/support/ourlady.php; via mail to: Lourdes Health Foundation - Our Lady Campaign, 1600 Haddon Avenue, Camden, NJ 08103; or via text by texting LHF to 27722 to give $10.
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Father Vincent G. Carpinelli, a priest of the Diocese of Camden for 40 years, will retire Dec. 1. Most recently, Father Carpinelli, 67, served as senior priest at Sts. Peter and Paul, Turnersville, since October 2010. He was pastor of St. Mary, Rosenhayn (1997-2003); and Our Lady of Lourdes, Glassboro (2003-10). Father Carpinelli, born in Philadelphia on Jan. 22, 1944, attended St. Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore, Md., and was ordained on May 22, 1971 by Bishop George H. Guilfoyle. His first assignment was as parochial vicar at Mary, Mother of the Church in Bellmawr, where he served from 1971-74. He also was parochial vicar of St. Rose of Lima Parish, Newfield, 1974-78; St. Bernadette, Northfield, 1978-85; St. Ann. Wildwood, 1985-89; St. Francis of Assisi, Vineland, 1989-90; and St. Bridget, Glassboro, 1993-97. He also served as chaplain of Cooper University Hospital, Camden; Priest Moderator for Project Rachel; secretary of the Padre Pio Shrine in Buena Borough; and as a member of the Marian Commission, the Liturgical Commission and the Presbyteral Council.
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Church law provides the opportunity for those claiming to be aggrieved by a decree to seek recourse in accord with the Code of Canon Law. It should be noted that Church Law (canon 1733) urges that parties in any dispute be encouraged to seek reconciliation even if formal recourse has been initiated. Canons 1732 through 1739 identify the process for seeking recourse against administrative decrees and most other individual administrative acts if no solution is able to be negotiated. In this instance, in which Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante, on November 11, 2011, in accord with canon 515 §2, DECREED, ANNOUNCED and PUBLISHED the merger of the Church of the Resurrection, 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora and St. Casimir’s R.C. Church, 304 Clay Street, Woodbine with its mission, St. Elizabeth’s Church, 561 Rt. 47 N., Goshen; and the establishment of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe, the following process for seeking reconciliation and recourse against this decision is also published: 1. Before initiating formal recourse, a written petition from a person (canon 96) who considers himself or herself aggrieved by this decree must be directed to: Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante Camden Diocesan Center 631 Market Street Camden, New Jersey 08102 Fax: 856-338-0376 In this letter, the person must first seek relief by requesting revocation or amendment of this decree (canon 1734 §1). In this same letter, the person should supply their mailing address so that the Bishop may respond. This initial petition must be received within a time limit of ten (10) business days of the legal notification of this decree (canon 1734 §2). Bishop Galante directs that this decree is to be published in the diocesan newspaper the Catholic Star Herald on Friday, November 11, 2011, and announced at all weekend Masses in the Church of the Resurrection, St. Casimir’s R.C. Church and St. Elizabeth’s Church on Saturday, November 12, 2011 and Sunday, November 13, 2011. Therefore, the obligation to present in writing a request for revocation or amendment of this decree must be received by Bishop Galante’s office no later than 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 29, 2011. 2. Bishop Galante has a period of thirty days within which to respond to this petition for revocation or amendment (canon 1735). During this period of time, Bishop Galante may suspend the execution of this decree, or the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved may submit a special petition to the Congregation for the Clergy [see address below] for suspension of the execution of this decree (canon 1736). 3. In responding to the substance of the petition it is envisioned that Bishop Galante may take one of three courses of action (canon 1735): a. Bishop Galante may act in a way that satisfies the person who considers himself or herself to have been aggrieved. b. Bishop Galante, may, within thirty (30) days respond to the petition by either denying the request or issuing a new or amended decree that still leaves the person, who considers himself or herself aggrieved, dissatisfied. c. Bishop Galante may choose not to respond to the initial petition. In this instance, the time period for the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved to initiate formal recourse begins on the thirtieth day after the petition for revocation or amendment was submitted. 4. If the Bishop’s response leaves the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved still dissatisfied, then the author of the initial petition seeking revocation or amendment of this decree has fifteen (15) business days to initiate formal recourse to the Congregation for the Clergy (canon 1737 §2). 5. In this instance, the recourse is addressed to the Congregation for the Clergy. This can be submitted directly to the following address: Most Reverend Mauro Piacenza Secretary Congregation for the Clergy Piazza Pio XII 3 00193 Rome, Italy Or, through the office of the Apostolic Nunciature: Most Reverend Carlo Maria Viganò Apostolic Nuncio to the United States 3339 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20008-3610 Or, through the office of Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante: Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante Camden Diocesan Center 631 Market Street Camden, New Jersey 08102 Fax: 856-338-0376 Canon law requires that whoever receives the recourse to the Congregation for the Clergy must transmit it immediately (canon 1737 §1). If the author of the formal recourse sends it directly to the Congregation for the Clergy, Bishop Galante should be notified by the person sending it to the Congregation that it has been filed. 6. The person making recourse against this decree has the right to engage the services of a canon lawyer (canon 1738). 7. If the Congregation for the Clergy does not act within three (3) consecutive months of receiving the recourse, canon law presumes that the response is negative (canon 57). If there has been no response within the three (3) months, or if the Congregation for the Clergy has issued a decision that leaves the person who considers himself or herself aggrieved still dissatisfied, then the person making the recourse has the right to make further recourse against the decision of the Congregation for the Clergy to the Apostolic Signatura within thirty (30) calendar days of the expiration of the three (3) month period, or thirty (30) calendar days from the receipt of the Congregation’s decision.
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Greetings In The Lord Among the most important responsibilities of the Bishop’s pastoral office is assurance that there is suitable provision of divine worship and Catholic community life for Christ’s faithful people who are committed to his care. At the same time the pastor of each parish needs to be able to satisfy without undue difficulty the parochial responsibilities assigned to him by his Bishop. The following just causes support the establishment of a consolidated parish in the Marmora, Woodbine and Goshen areas of Cape May and Cumberland Counties, New Jersey: 1. to provide more effectively for the pastoral needs of the faithful of the parish of the Church of the Resurrection in Cape May County, New Jersey; the parish of St. Casimir’s R.C. Church in Cape May and Cumberland Counties, New Jersey; and of St. Elizabeth’s Church in Cape May County, New Jersey; 2. to assure the vitality of parish life in this area; 3. to provide for a better stewardship of resources; and, 4. to provide for the optimum use of clergy, religious, and lay personnel. For the reasons listed above as well as recognizing that the Eucharist is the source and summit of our parish identity; because of the communality of the parish communities of the Church of the Resurrection, 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora and St. Casimir’s R.C. Church, 304 Clay Street, Woodbine with its mission, St. Elizabeth’s Church, 561 Rt. 47 N., Goshen; in response to the request of the pastor of these communities, Reverend Monsignor Peter M. Joyce, to unite these parishes; the favorable advice of the local Vicar Forane; and having listened to the opinions of the Presbyteral Council about the needs of the Catholic Faithful in this area of Cape May and Cumberland Counties, I have determined that the pastoral care of these communities will be fostered best by consolidating these individual communities and uniting them as one new parish. Accordingly, in virtue of the prescripts of canon 121 and canon 515, §1 of the Code of Canon Law, in order to provide more effectively for the spiritual welfare and the salvation of souls, having judged that sufficiently just causes are present, and having consulted the Presbyteral Council in accord with canon 515, §2, I hereby DECREE, ANNOUNCE and PUBLISH: The merger of the Church of the Resurrection, 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora and St. Casimir’s R.C. Church, 304 Clay Street, Woodbine with its mission, St. Elizabeth’s Church, 561 Rt. 47 N., Goshen and the establishment of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe. Reverend Monsignor Peter M. Joyce will serve as the Pastor of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe for a term of six years commencing on the effective date of this decree. The parochial church of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe, which retains its proper title and the name the Church of the Resurrection, is located at 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora, New Jersey. St. Casimir’s R.C. Church and St. Elizabeth’s Church will retain their own proper titles and will be maintained as worship sites to be used by the merged community. The territorial boundaries of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe will be the same as the combined boundaries of the former parishes of the Church of the Resurrection and St. Casimir’s R.C. Church with St. Elizabeth’s Church. The establishment of these parish boundaries is duly recorded at the Chancery Office of the Diocese of Camden, as: Start at the point where an imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend Moore’s Beach Rd. intersects the Delaware Bay near the Heislerville Wildlife Management area in Cumberland County. 1. North on the imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend Moore’s Beach Rd. then continue on Moore’s Beach Rd. to Rt. 47/ Delsea Drive 2. East on Rt. 47 to Hands Mill Rd. (Co. Rt. 651). 3. Northeast on Hands Mill Rd.(Co. Rt. 651) to Rt. 347 4. Northwest on Rt. 347 to Rt. 47 5. North on Rt. 47 to a dirt roadway approximately 1/10 of a mile south of Muskee Creek connecting Rt. 47 to the sand pits 6. East on this dirt road and its imaginary extension to Weatherby Rd.(Co. Rt. 548) where an imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend the Pennsylvania – Reading Seashore Line (railroad) intersects Weatherby Rd. 7. Northwest along the imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend the Pennsylvania – Reading Seashore Line, then continue along this rail line to the point it intersects Estell Manor Rd. 8. East on Estell Manor Rd. to Rt. 49 9. East on Rt. 49 to the Tuckahoe River 10. East along the Tuckahoe River, which is also the Cape May – Atlantic County line, to the point in the Great Egg Harbor Bay where the Cape May – Atlantic County line meets the Ocean City corporate line 11. South along the Ocean City corporate line through the Great Egg Harbor Bay then continue through Peck’s Bay to Crook Horn Creek 12. South through Crook Horn Creek still following the Ocean City corporate line to Middle Thorofare 13. South through Middle Thorofare and Main Channel following the Inland Waterway to the point in Ludlam Bay where the Inland Waterway intersects the Upper Township line 14. West along the Upper Township line to the point where it intersects the Garden State Parkway 15. South on the center of the Garden State Parkway to the point where an imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend Landing Rd in Clermont intersects the Garden State Parkway 16. West/ southwest on the imaginary (straight) line drawn to extend Landing Rd. then on Landing Rd. to Rt. 9/ Shore Rd. 17. South on Rt. 9 to a point where a side road leads east (Parkway Dr.) just to the north of the Cape May County Park and Zoo (on the west side of Rt. 9) 18. Use an imaginary (straight) line drawn to connect the intersection of Parkway Dr. and Rt. 9 to the point on Dennisville Rd.(Co. Rt. 657) where there is an entrance to Atlantic – Cape Community College approximately 1 mile north of the intersection of Rt. 9 and Dennisville Rd. The goods and property of the parishes of the Church of the Resurrection and St. Casimir’s R.C. Church with its mission, St. Elizabeth’s Church, including their real estate and buildings, as well as their debts and obligations, shall be assigned to The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe. Further, the voluntary offerings of the faithful, as well as other grants, pledges and gifts which have been or will be made to either of these predecessor parishes will constitute revenue to The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe for the benefit of the pastoral life of this community of the faithful as well as the rightful support of those who minister to them. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the sacramental registers of the Church of the Resurrection, 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora and St. Casimir’s R.C. Church, 304 Clay Street, Woodbine with its mission, St. Elizabeth’s Church, 561 Rt. 47 N., Goshen will be closed and moved to the seat of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe, 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora. All sacraments administered from that date forward will be recorded in new sacramental registers of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe. I approve the statutes of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe as submitted. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the financial accounts of the Church of the Resurrection, 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora and St. Casimir’s R.C. Church, 304 Clay Street, Woodbine with its mission, St. Elizabeth’s Church, 561 Rt. 47 N., Goshen will have been closed and transferred to the financial account of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe. As of the effective date of this DECREE, the Church of the Resurrection, 200 W. Tuckahoe Road, Marmora, St. Casimir’s R.C. Church, 304 Clay Street, Woodbine and St. Elizabeth’s Church, 561 Rt. 47 N., Goshen will be civilly consolidated under the laws of the State of New Jersey as The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe, Marmora, N.J. This DECREE becomes effective on December 14, 2011. I instruct that this DECREE be communicated immediately to the parishioners of The Parish of St. Maximilian Kolbe by Reverend Monsignor Peter M. Joyce whom I have herein named their Pastor. This DECREE is likewise to be published immediately in the Catholic Star Herald and on the diocesan website. Given in Camden, on this 11th day of November 2011, at the Diocesan Center. Joseph A. Galante Bishop of Camden In cujus fidem… Robert E. Hughes Chancellor
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Thursday, 17 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Jacob Tennyson Einstein, Jr., “Tenny,” of Woodbury Heights, died after a lengthy illness on Sunday, Nov. 13, at the age of 81. He was the father of Sister Jerilyn Einstein, FMIJ, principal of Guardian Angel Regional School, Gibbstown. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Einstein played semi-pro baseball before serving in the Maryland National Guard for over 10 years. He built a successful career in the insurance business, where he retired as Underwriting Manager for Crum and Forster in Philadelphia, and later as General Manager for the Dalton Insurance Agency in Glassboro. He was an avid sports enthusiast, and he belonged to Infant Jesus Parish and Woodbury Heights Senior Citizens clubs. Mr. Einstein enjoyed trips to the casino and traveled extensively. He was described as a generous and humorous gentleman. He made friends easily with his easy-going personality and good-natured ways, would go out of his way to help others, and cherished the time spent with his family. He was the husband of 57 years to Mary Joseph (nee Romoser); father of Mark Tennyson (Suzanne) and Sister Jerilyn Einstein; grandfather of Joshua (Heather), Benjamin, and Matthew; and great-grandfather of Jacob Tennyson Einstein III. Relatives and friends are invited to the viewing on Friday, Nov. 18, 7:30-9 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 19, 9-10:15 a.m. at Infant Jesus Parish at St. Margaret’s Church, 3rd and Beech streets, Woodbury Heights, where Mass will follow at 10:30 a.m. Entombment will be at Calvary Mausoleum, Cherry Hill. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Infant Jesus, 1215 Kresson Road, Cherry Hill, NJ 08003.
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William “Bill” McBlain, Jr. of Cherry Hill died on Nov. 12, at the age of 44. Mr. McBlain attended St. Peter Celestine School and Camden Catholic High School, both in Cherry Hill. He was active in scouting and attained the rank of Eagle Scout. He attended Franciscan University in Steubenville, Ohio, and Rutgers University in Camden. He worked in information systems technology as systems administrator for ADP Financial Services, Jevic Trucking and Sungard, Inc. Mr. McBlain enjoyed fishing with his children and he was a Philadelphia Eagles fan with his school buddies. Mr. McBlain was the son of Deacon Leo McBlain, director of the Permanent Diaconate, Diocese of Camden, and Barbara (nee Farren) of Cherry Hill. He is also survived by his children Kaitlyn, Ryan and Cassidy and his former wife Lisa (nee Laurenzi) all of Cherry Hill; his siblings; and many cousins, nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. He was the brother of Stephen McBlain (Sue) of Cherry Hill; Mary Beard (Jack) of Cherry Hill; Eileen Bekic (John) of Roseville, Calif.; Nancy Lee (Ernie) of Cherry Hill; and the late Peter and Andrew McBlain. The Mass of Christian burial was celebrated at Christ Our Light Church, Cherry Hill, on Thursday, Nov. 17. Interment private. In lieu of flowers contributions in his memory may be made to benefit the McBlain children. Visit www.schetterfh.com to share your condolences with the family.
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“A Priest’s Dream” is included in “One Priest’s Dream: Reflections,” a collection of columns and other writing by Msgr. Thomas J. McIntyre. The aging seminary professor was customarily stern, even though he was a champion in being able to share the deposit of the faith with the next generation. He was used to speaking intently, yet on this occasion he breathed a sigh of relief and seemed to cast aside his usual temperament. With piercing eyes, he narrowed his gaze on the young men before him, paused, and calmly shared his own spiritual insight into God’s forgiveness and mercy. “In the final analysis,” he said with deliberation, “don’t be afraid to err on the side of compassion.” Thinking back to the timing of the particular class, his direction was that much more remarkable. The sacramental effects of the Second Vatican Council had not yet taken hold. We were still years to go for the new emphasis in the sacrament of reconciliation that would see a judgmental-like, ritualized approach in individual confession replaced by more a conversation-like experience of what it means to share in God’s redeeming love. Gone would be the “laundry lists’ and an excessive, unhealthy sense of individual sinfulness and the fear with which it was associated. Yet to come would be the more wholesome approach that would see redemption much more tied to God’s prerogative and gift. Humanity’s responsibility and cooperation with divine grace would focus more on an outgoing and pervasive choice of God’s ways, or not. With this comes a revived consciousness of community impact. But the time was still 1962, and memories abounded of a harsher experience. Years later, we would laugh about a more innocent time. Do you remember the confession lines and how the longest usually indicated who the church militant were who tried to avoid becoming the church suffering? We know by their lines who the compassionate confessors were. “The Lord’s way was to welcome sinners,” the prof recounted, undoubtedly reflecting on his own human weakness. Jesus did just that, I thought. His intent was clear from his behavior and the parables he preached. Mary Magdalen, the prodigal son, the lost sheep and the good thief will always be examples for sinful people who wander from the fold but who have enough sense to eventually turn back to God’s redeeming hand. Not so the attitudinally pure: the scribes, the Pharisees and an older brother of the prodigal who forever typify the real danger of a religiously haughty lifestyle. “The amount of sinfulness, the number of years, don’t make any difference as long as the sinner has returned.” Years later I would be amazed at the workings of the Lord in conversion. After 30 years or more, some returned for reconciliation. As the confessor, I could only count my participation in that event as the blessing of sharing in God’s mercy. The class I have referred to had that effect on more than myself. “Whatever you do, be kind,” is a recollection that many of my classmates still talk about. The old prof is gone, as are the long lines, but his spirit still lives, a spirit that is as real as Jesus’ own intent in dying on the cross. “Imagine standing on the doorstep to eternity and discovering that your judgment of people has been more severe than God’s.” How often our greatest failure as individuals is just that. Years before we would emphasize God’s constant love for us and change our sacramental training of the young with motivational approaches of love rather than fear, a graying priest saw it all. A meditative spirit does wonders, at times, in remembering the best of the past. Maybe this is the Lent the Lord will use in bringing more of us home through reconciliation. One priest’s dream had more of an impact than he ever realized. We witnessed his finest hour.
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Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Speaker Mark Nimo visited the Diocese of Camden on Nov. 8-9, telling his tale of growing up in Ghana, West Africa, having a profound conversion experience at 20, and now serving God through his work with the Catholic Charismatic Renewal Movement and religious education in Chicago. On Nov. 8, Nimo met with diocesan evangelization leaders from 24 parishes in a training event at Our Lady of Peace Parish in Williamstown, and the next night he met with young adults during Theology on Tap at Chickie’s and Pete’s in Egg Harbor Township, with a talk on “How to Walk on Water: Discipleship and Evangelization.”
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Karen Gulla, fifth grade homeroom teacher and Middle School Language Arts teacher at Assumption School, Atco, is the recipient of the Teacher Legacy Award from Catholic Holy Family Society. She received an engraved brass bell, $200 for the classroom and a $100 gift certificate. Gulla was nominated by Kelly Conway, a parent whose three children attend Assumption School.
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Students at Our Lady of Hope Regional School, Blackwood, participate in its first Race for Education fundraiser on Nov. 9. With sponsors to support their running and walking, the students have raised more than $20,000 and donations are still coming in. Funds will be used to enhance the school’s technology.
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Catholic school students honored, and fed, veterans on Veterans Day. In photo, members of Cadette Girl Scout Troop 62532 shared more than 30 boxes of Girl Scout cookies with veterans of World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Iraq and Afghanistan who attended the Gloucester County Veteran’s Day Ceremony at the Justice Complex in Woodbury. The scouts, all seventh grade students at Guardian Angel Regional School in Paulsboro, shared another 50 boxes of cookies with service men and women overseas earlier this year thanks to donations they collected during their annual sale. Pictured with the girls are members of the Semper Fidelis Detachment of the Marine Corps League in Wenonah, who served as Color Guard at the event.
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Gloucester Catholic Five Gloucester Catholic High School seniors signed national letters of intent Nov. 9 to play baseball at NCAA Division 1 universities. They are Robbie Alessandrine, Monmouth University; Joe Brooks, East Carolina University; John Brue, St. Joseph’s University; Patrick Kane, Old Dominion University; and Brett Tenuto, Stony Brook University. The 2011 Gloucester Catholic baseball team captured the NJSIAA Non-Public B State crown, their 15th title, extending their state record, and finishing among the top teams in the country in two national polls. The Rams won an astounding 20 games by the 10-run mercy rule, including three of their final four post season games. Their 31-2 overall record gave Coach Dennis Barth’s team honors as “Team of the Year” by two separate publications. St. Joseph Prior to the start of their Oct. 15 football game against Lower Cape May, the St. Joseph’s High School (Hammonton) school administration presented Coach Sacco with a 250th Win Football. He reached the 250th win goal after their previous win, the week before. One of the St. Joseph field hockey team’s star players last year was Megan DeMarco, a 1st Team All Parochial; 1st Team Atlantic City Press; 1st Team All Conference; 1st Team All South Jersey; 1st Team All Group 1 All State; Leading scorer in South Jersey with 45 Goals; Leading scorer in school history season with 45 goals and career with 126 Goals; Fall Female Athlete of the year Atlantic City Press; Female Athlete of the Year Cape Atlantic League; Old Grad Award, the Best Female Athlete in Atlantic County; and MVP of her team. She helped her team achieve a 23-1 record. Paul VI At Paul VI High School in Haddonfield on Nov. 9, two high school senior athletes signed Letters of Intent to play for Division I NCAA schools. Senior Ron Curry committed to play basketball at James Madison University in Virginia, while Pat Petrongolo committed to play baseball at Jacksonville State University in Alabama. In Paul VI girls’ varsity volleyball, the team qualified for the state tournament with a record of 12-8, in only their second season as a varsity program. After winning only four games in their inaugural season, the girls made an incredible improvement and played competitively in every match. The team was led by the consistent play of their junior setters, Kelly Duphorn (1st team) and Allison Calabria (2nd team). At the net, sophomores Katie Underwood (2nd team) and Brenna Jones led the team in kills. The girls lost a hard fought match to St. Joe’s Hammonton in the state tournament; however, the future is bright as the team only graduates two seniors, Alyssa Pierson and Allison Caruso. Mike Burkeitt, a senior at Paul VI, has been nominated for a Parade Magazine Rudy Award. Camden Catholic The Camden Catholic High School (Cherry Hill) Girls’ field hockey went to the championship game for Group 2 after winning the Central Jersey title. They lost 4-3 to West Essex. Tara Vittese, a sophomore, was the 3rd leading goal scorer in South Jersey and 4th leading scorer in New Jersey with 73 goals and 32 assists. The Fighting Irish football team went undefeated into the playoff run as 8-0. Last time an Irish football team went undefeated going into playoffs was in 2003. They play Holy Cross in the 2nd round of playoffs. Senior Marcus Coleman, team captain, has signed with Syracuse University.
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Wednesday, 23 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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La Oficina de Censos de los Estados Unidos ha confirmado recientemente que más de 49 millones de estadounidenses, o 16% de la población, viven en la pobreza. Asimismo, la Oficina de Servicios de Asistencia Jurídica del Instituto de Investigación de la Pobreza de Nueva Jersey ha documentado la alarmante profundidad y dimensión de la pobreza en ese estado, generalmente calificado como el segundo o tercero más rico del país. En 2009, más de 799,000 residentes de Nueva Jersey percibían ingresos inferiores al índice de pobreza oficial, ingresos tan bajos que no les permitían llegar a fin de mes y hacían necesarios los cupones de alimentos para que pudieran subsistir. Lamentablemente, si bien los pobres ya son cientos de miles, a menudo, resultan invisibles a nuestros ojos. Mientras la difícil situación de estos, nuestros hermanos y hermanas, continúa empeorando, nosotros no podemos mantenernos al margen, en silencio. No podemos ignorar a los niños que se van a dormir con hambre, a los padres que están sin trabajo, a las familias que no tienen techo, a los enfermos que sufren, sin recibir atención médica, o a los ancianos que pasan sus días en viviendas insalubres o inseguras. Nosotros, los Obispos Católicos de Nueva Jersey, convocamos a todas las personas de buena voluntad a aunar sus esfuerzos para atender las críticas necesidades de los pobres que viven entre nosotros. Debemos recordar que el valor moral de una sociedad se mide principalmente por la justicia con que da respuesta a los más vulnerables. Este recordatorio puede resultar incómodo para una sociedad en la que una cantidad exorbitante de riqueza se concentra en el sector más alto de la escalera económica, pero bien sirve para recordarnos que ignoramos a nuestros hermanos y hermanas vulnerables al costo de nuestra responsabilidad moral y social. ¿En qué consiste la enseñanza católica sobre la pobreza? La preocupación de la Iglesia por los pobres está inspirada en el Evangelio y el mandato inequívoco de Jesús. Jesús nos enseña que una forma segura de encontrarlo es sirviendo a los pobres, a los hambrientos, a los enfermos y a los desconocidos. “Les aseguro que cada vez que lo hicieron con el más pequeño de mis hermanos, lo hicieron conmigo” . Su mandato de recibir a los desconocidos, alimentar a los hambrientos, curar a los enfermos y cuidar a los pobres no es menos relevante hoy de lo que lo fue hace 2,000 años. La enseñanza social católica sobre la pobreza está basada en la caridad y la justicia. La caridad se refiere a nuestra obligación de proporcionar servicios sociales directos a quienes tienen necesidades básicas que requieren inmediata atención. Esto incluye, entre otras cosas, servir a los pobres en comedores comunitarios, donar alimentos, dinero o ropa, u orientar a las familias en riesgo. Justicia significa esforzarnos por corregir la desigualdad que desde hace mucho tiempo reina en nuestra sociedad. Esto incluye, entre otras cosas, apoyar políticas públicas justas sobre vivienda, cuidado de la salud y educación. ¿Quiénes son los pobres? La pobreza tiene muchas caras, los jóvenes y los ancianos, los profesionales y los no profesionales, los que recibieron educación y los que no, los nativos y los inmigrantes y los que tienen fe religiosa o carecen de ella. Ellos pueden ser nuestros vecinos, dondequiera que vivamos, en las ciudades, en los suburbios o en las áreas rurales. Los pobres no son un grupo socioeconómico estático. Muchas personas que alguna vez fueron autosuficientes, ahora se encuentran al borde de la pobreza a raíz de un suceso que les cambió la vida. Según informes de nuestras agencias de Caridades Católicas, muchas de las personas que en el pasado contribuyeron a financiar los diferentes programas con sus donaciones, ahora son clientes que necesitan servicios. La difícil situación de los pobres se torna aún más desesperante si esos pobres son niños, discapacitados, analfabetos o víctimas de violencia o abuso. No nos debe sorprender el hecho de que muchas de las personas azotadas por la pobreza pierdan la esperanza de algún cambio significativo en sus vidas o, que incluso, se desmoralicen. ¿Qué debemos hacer? Los pobres necesitan desesperadamente asistencia financiera, pero también hay otras cosas importantes que necesitan de nosotros. En primer lugar, no solo es necesario que recemos por los menos afortunados, sino también por nosotros mismos, para que tengamos la voluntad de cumplir con nuestras obligaciones para con nuestros hermanos y hermanas. En segundo lugar, debemos dejar de lado los estereotipos. Debemos aceptar a los necesitados como nuestro prójimo, como un prójimo que merece no solo nuestra caridad, sino también justicia, en el más verdadero de los sentidos, y con ello la oportunidad de poder valerse por sí mismos. La Escritura nos llama a actuar con valor, generosidad, justicia y amor. Si no lo hacemos, nuestro compromiso adquiere un tono de falsedad. “¿De qué le sirve a uno, hermanos míos, decir que tiene fe, si no tiene obras?.... Lo mismo pasa con la fe: si no va acompañada de las obras, está completamente muerta”. La compasión, por sí sola, no ayuda a los pobres. Necesitamos un firme compromiso de acción social, un movimiento de bases que comience con los individuos y luego se extienda a la familia, a la comunidad y al gobierno Los esfuerzos de los individuos son un punto de partida crítico e incluso pueden ser nobles y salvar vidas. Sin embargo, la profundidad y la complejidad de los desafíos que enfrentamos superan los recursos y las capacidades de los individuos. Nuestros esfuerzos individuales por sí solos no detendrán la oleada de creciente pobreza que nos invade hoy; es necesaria una acción colectiva. No debemos poner como excusa el haber fracasado en la acción colectiva en el pasado para no actuar hoy, y la difícil realidad económica por la que atravesamos en la actualidad no es una razón aceptable para no actuar en nombre de los pobres. Necesitamos un Programa de Acción de parte de las personas, las iglesias, las sinagogas, las mezquitas, el gobierno y el sector privado. Para ayudar a desarrollar un Programa de Acción, la Conferencia Católica de Nueva Jersey, con la colaboración de las agencias de Caridades Católicas, convocará a cuatro grupos de trabajo a tratar específicamente cuestiones críticas que impactan sobre la pobreza: el debilitamiento de la vida familiar, el fracaso de los sistemas educativos, el desempleo y los trabajos mal remunerados y la no disponibilidad de viviendas asequibles. El objetivo será identificar recomendaciones pragmáticas para ayudar a fortalecer a las familias, mejorar las escuelas, reducir el desempleo, asegurar salarios dignos y aumentar la disponibilidad de viviendas asequibles. Esta iniciativa será supervisada a través de un Consejo de Asesoramiento formado por respetados profesionales. Por mandato de Jesús, debemos amar a nuestro prójimo y a nuestros enemigos. Él nos ordenó compartir lo que tenemos con quienes no lo tienen. Seguir este mandamiento es el camino más certero para llegar a la paz y a la verdadera prosperidad. Tenemos la esperanza de que los cuatro grupos de trabajo que estamos estableciendo proporcionen una guía clara para ayudar a fortalecer el compromiso de nuestra sociedad de reducir la pobreza, lo cual, a su vez, llevaría más paz y prosperidad a nuestras comunidades.
Wednesday, 23 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
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On Monday Nov, 14, the students and staff of Holy Trinity Regional School, Westville, held a formal new flag dedication ceremony outside of their school. The Military Order of the Purple Heart members’ organizations in the area donated the flag and pole. The local orders include Glassboro, Deptford and Gloucester City. Chuck Byers, Commander: Chapter 336 DJ Bentz, was instrumental in organizing this effort for Holy Trinity. The school has prepared a plaque to recognize the contribution of the Purple Hearts’ organization.
Wednesday, 23 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
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Our Lady of Mercy Academy’s principal Sister Grace Marie shares classroom time with new students Maria Ruban, left, a resident of Kiev, Ukraine, and Ruta Vetra, whose family resides in the City of Jurmala in Latvia. The two girls are juniors at the Newfield school. It’s not listed as one of the courses provided to students at Our Lady of Mercy Academy but, fact is, international relations has become the focus of the entire student body, faculty and administration at the all-girls college preparatory school in Newfield. The enrollment of two foreign students will have that effect. The start of the 2011-12 school year marked a milestone for OLMA when two young women – Ruta Vetra and Maria Ruban – enrolled at the school. Vetra arrived from the City of Jurmala in Latvia. Ruban came to America from Kiev, Ukraine. Both 16, they are members of the junior class at the Gloucester County school. “We were thrilled when we heard from the Diocese (of Camden) that the young ladies’ families were interested in enrolling the girls at our school,” said principal Sister Grace Marie. “It’s been quite some time since we have had a student from another country here at OLMA. But it’s been a wonderful experience for everyone; the two girls, our students, teachers and staff. “They have acclimated well to their new surroundings,” Sister Grace added. According to Oleg Ruban, the search for an American school for his daughter was prompted by his own experiences in the United States during previous visits to this country. “This is paradise,” said Ruban, who accompanied Maria on her trip to America to choose a school. “America provides wonderful academics and it was our dream to see Maria attend school here,” Ruban added. “We looked at many schools but when we saw Our Lady of Mercy Academy, we knew it was right. The school is not too large. It seems like a family.” During his visit to tour OLMA, the elder Ruban was asked to address the junior and senior classes. During the discussion held in the school gym, he talked candidly about his growing up in the communist era that defined the former Soviet Union, a time when speaking out against the government could end in death. He also described the impact of the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident on April 26, 1986, where “people are still sick and dying today because of what happened 25 years ago,” he said. “It was riveting for the girls and teachers to hear him speak,” said Sister Grace. “You can read about those things in school but to hear it described by someone who lived through it .…” For the two girls, the transition into the American education system has been softened by their knowledge of the English language. Both students excelled in their schools back home and have fit in well at OLMA. “I enjoy the challenge (of the OLMA courses),” said Vetra. “School is not meant to be easy.” As for Ruban, while leaving her mother, Tetiania, and father behind on the other side of the planet has not been easy, she cherishes the opportunity to be in America. The use of Skype to communicate on a regular basis has helped ease her homesickness. “This is what I have always wanted,” she explained. “We grow up (in the Ukraine) reading about life in America and it all seemed so wonderful. But it is much better than I imagined. People are so friendly and very helpful. I am so happy to be here.” As part of their “initiation” into the American way of life, both Vetra and Ruban were provided a tour of area “hotspots” by their classmates. Trips to Wawa and Applebees were part of the plan. “When I arrived, all the girls kept talking about Wawa and Applebees,” said Vetra. “I didn’t understand what a Wawa was. Now I go there quite often.” That’s just a small part of maintaining positive international relations.
Wednesday, 23 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Front Page of Newspaper/Latest Front Page Images
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Monday, 19 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Sports/Sports News
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Gloucester Catholic Geoff Wade has been named the new head wrestling coach at Gloucester Catholic High School for the 2011-12 season. Wade served previously as an assistant under Bill Lucas since 1999 and was formerly a standout wrestler at Woodbury High School and Gloucester County College. The Woodbury resident, who owns a personal training fitness studio in Riverton, is excited about taking over a team that has several returning sophomores and juniors on the roster. “This is a great opportunity to develop a winning culture here, and these wrestlers have the talent to accomplish that,” said Wade, whose team competes in the Tri-County Conference Diamond Division. “I’m looking forward to the new season.” Holy Spirit Seniors Nigel Jones and Donta Pollock of Holy Spirit High School, Absecon, could become the first set of classmates in New Jersey to pass 4,000 career rushing yards in the same season. Donta has 4,317 yards and Nigel has 3,936. According to football historian, Chuck Langerman, “the feat also was accomplished by a pair of running backs from Libert Hill High School in Texas in 2005.” There are 25 players who have rushed for 4,000 career yards, but just three sets from the same school. Wildwood Catholic Fran St. John, legendary basketball coach at Wildwood Catholic, has retired from coaching after 45 successful years. Coach St. John has coached close to 1,000 career games and has been the face of basketball in this community. His son Jeff attended Wildwood Catholic, scored 1,000 points, went to Georgetown then finished Harvard Law. St. Augustine Six members of the St. Augustine Prep Lacrosse Team signed official letters of intent to play at Division I programs next year at a ceremony held in the Media Center on Nov. 15. The Hermit seniors and the schools they will be attending are: midfielders Steven Pontrello (University of North Carolina), Thomas O’Neill (Penn State University), and William McMenamin (Wagner College); goalie Joseph Gigantiello (Denver University); attack Patrick McMenamin (Wagner College), and defenseman Bryan Phillips (Drexel University). In addition, three underclass lacrosse players have already verbally committed to Division I programs. All nine were members of the Hermits team that reached the finals of the New Jersey Private School Class A championship tournament last season.
Wednesday, 23 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
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The U.S Census Bureau recently confirmed that over 49 million Americans, or 16% of the population, live in poverty. Similarly, the Legal Services of New Jersey Poverty Research Institute has documented the alarming depth and breadth of poverty in New Jersey — a state that is frequently ranked as the second or third richest state in the country. In 2009, over 799,000 New Jersey residents had incomes lower than the official poverty rate — incomes so low that they were unable to make ends meet and required food stamps to survive. Sadly, although the poor are in the hundreds of thousands, they are often invisible to us. As the plight of these, our brothers and sisters, continues to spiral downward, we cannot stand by in silence. We cannot ignore children who go to bed hungry, parents who are jobless, families who are homeless, the sick who suffer without medical care, or the elderly who live in infested or unsafe housing. We, the Catholic Bishops of New Jersey, call upon all people of good will to address the critical needs of the poor who live among us. We must remember that the moral worth of a society is measured primarily by how justly it responds to the most vulnerable. This can be an uncomfortable reminder for a society in which an inordinate amount of wealth is concentrated at the top of the economic ladder but it is a reminder that we ignore our vulnerable brothers and sisters at our moral and societal peril. What is Catholic Teaching on poverty? The Church’s concern for the poor is inspired by the Gospel and Jesus’ unequivocal command. Jesus teaches us that a sure way to find Him is to serve the poor, the hungry, the ill, and the stranger. “Whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.” His command to welcome the stranger, to feed the hungry, to heal the sick and care for the poor is no less relevant today than it was 2,000 years ago. Catholic social teaching on poverty is based on charity and justice. Charity refers to our duty to provide direct social services to those in immediate need of life’s basic necessities. This may include, among other things, serving the poor in soup kitchens, donating food, money or clothing, or mentoring an at-risk family. Justice means that we strive to correct the long standing inequities in our society. This may involve, among other things, advocating for fair public policies on housing, health care and education. Who are the poor? Poverty has many faces — the young and old, the professional and non-professional, the educated and uneducated, the native born and the immigrant, and those with or without a religious faith. They may live next door to us wherever we live — in cities, suburbs or rural areas. The poor are not a static socio-economic group. Many people who were once self-sufficient now find themselves on the edge of poverty because of a life changing event. Our Catholic Charities agencies report that many donors, who in the past have financially contributed to programs, are now clients in need of services. The plight of the poor becomes even more desperate if the poor are children, disabled, illiterate, or victims of violence or abuse. We should not be surprised that many stricken by poverty lose hope of any meaningful change in their lives, and become demoralized. What Must We Do? The poor desperately need financial assistance, but they also need other important things from us. First, we need to pray for the less fortunate and also for ourselves that we have the will to fulfill our obligations to our brothers and sisters. Second, we must set aside stereotypes. We must accept those in need as neighbors deserving not only just charity but also justice in the truest sense so that they will have at least the chance to become self-sufficient. Scripture calls us to act with courage, generosity, justice and love. If we fail to act, our faith commitment rings hollow. “What good is it if someone says he has faith, but does not have works? Faith of itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” Empathy, alone, does not help the poor. We need a firm societal commitment to action — a grass roots movement that begins with individuals, and then expands to family, community, and government. The efforts of individuals are a critical starting point and even can be noble and life-saving. However, the depth and complexity of the challenges we face are greater than the resources and capabilities of individuals. Our individual efforts alone will not stem today’s tide of increasing poverty; we need collective action. Past failures at collective action should not be used as an excuse to fail to act today, and the current difficult economic times are not an acceptable reason to fail to act on behalf of the poor. We need an Agenda for Action by individuals, churches, synagogues, mosques, government and the private sector. To assist in developing an Agenda for Action, the New Jersey Catholic Conference with cooperation from Catholic Charities agencies will convene four task forces to focus on critical issues impacting poverty: the weakening of family life, failing education systems, unemployment and low-paying jobs, and unavailable affordable housing. The goal will be to identify pragmatic recommendations to help strengthen families, improve schools, reduce unemployment, assure living wages, and increase affordable housing. We will provide oversight for this initiative through an Advisory Council consisting of respected practitioners. Jesus commanded us to love our neighbors and our enemies. He told us that we must share what we have with those who are without. Following this commandment is a most certain path to peace and true prosperity. We are hopeful that the four task forces we are establishing will provide clear guidance to help strengthen our society’s commitment to reducing poverty which, in turn, would increase peace and prosperity in our communities. --------------------------------------------------- The Catholic Bishops of New Jersey Most Reverend John J. Myers Archbishop, Archdiocese of Newark Most Reverend David M. O’Connell, C.M. Bishop, Diocese of Trenton Most Reverend Arthur J. Serratelli Bishop, Diocese of Paterson Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante Bishop, Diocese of Camden Most Reverend Edgar M. da Cunha, S.D.V. Regional Bishop for Essex County Most Reverend Thomas A. Donato Regional Bishop for Hudson County Most Reverend Paul G. Bootkoski Bishop, Diocese of Metuchen Most Reverend William Skurla Bishop, Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic Most Reverend Yousef Habash Bishop, Eparchy of Our Lady of Deliverance Most Reverend Manuel A. Cruz Regional Bishop for Union County Most Reverend John W. Flesey, S.T.D. Regional Bishop for Bergen County Most Rev. Peter L. Gerety Archbishop Emeritus, Archdiocese of Newark Most Rev. John M. Smith Bishop Emeritus, Diocese of Trenton Most Rev. Frank J. Rodimer Bishop Emeritus, Diocese of Paterson Most Rev. Edward T. Hughes Bishop Emeritus, Diocese of Metuchen Most Rev. Dominic A. Marconi Retired Auxiliary Bishop, Archdiocese of Newark Most Rev. David Arias Retired Auxiliary Bishop, Archdiocese of Newark Most Rev. Charles J. McDonnell Retired Auxiliary Bishop, Archdiocese of Newark
Wednesday, 23 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Front Page of Newspaper/Latest Front Page Images
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Thursday, 01 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Ivan Picinic, the father of Father John Picinic, died Monday, Nov. 28. A funeral Mass will be celebrated on Friday, Dec. 2, 10:30 a.m., at St. John the Baptist Church, 239 Anderson Avenue, Fairview, N.J. Interment will be at Madonna Mausoleum in Fort Lee.
Thursday, 01 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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On Tuesday, Nov. 22 the Vietnamese Catholic Community of Our Lady Star of the Sea Parish, Atlantic City, celebrated the Feast of 117 Vietnamese Martyrs, commemorating the Nov. 24, 1988 canonization of Vietnamese Catholic martyrs, who worked to spread the Catholic faith for the last 400 years despite persecution. Pope John Paul II canonized the 117 known Vietnamese martyrs, and he also acknowledged that between 130,000 and 300,000 known and unknown Vietnamese Catholics were martyred from the 17th-20th centuries. During the 6:30 p.m. Mass, Vietnamese Catholics from Our Lady Star of the Sea sang, danced, and were inspired by the strength and faith of the martyrs who spread the Gospel. Afterward a reception was held in the school gymnasium/memorial hall. Photos by Alan M. Dumoff
Thursday, 01 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Thanksgiving in the Camden Diocese St. John Neumann Parish, North Cape May, collected 24,000 pounds (12 tons) of food during its Feed My Sheep Campaign thatbegan in October. Food was divided among four local charities and organizations: Catholic Charities in Rio Grande, Holy Redeemer in Swainton, Lower Township Elementary School District and Lower Township Rescue Squad. Students in top photos: shown with bags of food; members of Gloucester Catholic High School’s Student Council and National Honor Society get ready to distribute Thanksgiving baskets. Other parishes, schools and organizations have also been involved in collecting, distributing — and eating — food this time of year. Bottom photos: Parents at St. Vincent de Paul Regional School, Mays Landing, serve food at a senior citizen Thanksgiving dinner on Nov. 6. Bonnie Cleary and Susan O’Malley of Bishop Eustace Preparatory School, Pennsauken, carry a container of donated food Nov. 17. Girl Scouts help out at the Thanksgiving dinner sponsored Nov. 24 by the Columbiettes and Kings Things at St. Clare of Assisi Hall, Swedesboro. Photos by Alan M. Dumoff
Thursday, 01 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
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Jason Evert, a presenter at the National Catholic Youth Conference in Indianapolis Nov. 17-19, has his photo taken with members of the youth group from Our Lady of Peace Parish, Williamstown. From staff and wire reports INDIANAPOLIS — In a soft voice touched with reverence, 17-year-old Nicole Richardson recalled one of the most poignant moments of the National Catholic Youth Conference in Indianapolis Nov. 17-19. It was a moment that revealed the depth of faith that many young Catholics share, a moment that showed the hope and the promise of the Catholic Church now and for the future. The moment occurred as Richardson walked toward the Indiana Convention Center in the late afternoon of Nov. 17 with her group of 34 teenagers and adults from Holy Cross Parish in Orlando, Fla. Across the street, the heavy wooden doors of St. John the Evangelist Church suddenly opened and a eucharistic procession of about 2,000 people flowed down the street and toward the main entrance of the convention center, stopping traffic at rush hour in the heart of the city. Seeing the Eucharist on display in a new 3-foot-high monstrance made in Poland, Richardson and the others in her group knelt on the sidewalk as the procession passed by on a cold, windy, gray day. “It was so beautiful to see in such a busy city how quiet and reverent it was,” she recalled. “Even if you weren’t Catholic or you don’t have religion, it would have showed you how faith can change people, how faith can change the world.” As the procession weaved its way through the crowded halls of the convention center toward a chapel that had been created in one of the ballrooms, teenagers and adults lined the route, most standing quietly, others bending to kneel, some wiping away tears. “With everyone singing the same chant, it just felt like we were all one,” said Justus Schremmer, 17, a member of St. Mary Parish in Russell, Kan. “There was that feeling of unison. It was the feeling of being part of something bigger.” From the Diocese of Camden, 36 youth and adults made the pilgrimage to Indianapolis, coming from the parishes of Holy Angels, Woodbury; Our Lady of Sorrows, Linwood; St. Gianna Beretta Molla, Northfield; and Our Lady of Peace, Williamstown. For the whole contingent, “it was inspiring to see 23,000 youths gathered, and celebrating the Catholic faith together,” said Kari Janisse, youth minister at Our Lady of Peace. Jeff Young, youth minister at St. Gianna Beretta Molla, was pleased that there were a number of conference workshops, devoted to social media such as Twitter and Facebook. In order to effectively communicate with the youth, and get the Catholic message across, these forms of digital media must be utilized. “That’s where they are, that’s what they understand,” he said.
Thursday, 01 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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The 24th annual collection for the Retirement Fund for Religious will be taken up Dec. 10-11, in the Diocese of Camden. Sponsored by the National Religious Retirement Office (NRRO) in Washington, D.C., the appeal asks Catholics to Share in the Care of more than 34,000 women and men religious past age 70. Last year, the Diocese of Camden contributed $197,369.10 to this collection. In 2011, the Daughters of Our Lady of Mercy, Daughters of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Infant Jesus, Hospitaller Order of St. John of God, and the Little Servant Sisters of the Immaculate Conception received financial assistance made possible by the national appeal. Additionally, religious who serve or have served in the diocese but whose communities are based elsewhere may also benefit from the Retirement Fund for Religious. “We are continually humbled by the generosity shown this appeal,” said NRRO Executive Director Sister Janice Bader, a member of the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood of O’Fallon, Missouri. “Since the fund was launched in 1988, Catholics have donated $643 million to assist religious communities in caring for their elder members.” As a result of the 2010 collection, which garnered $26.7 million, the NRRO was able to distribute $23 million to religious communities to help support the day-to-day care of senior members. An additional $2.7 million was allocated toward initiatives targeted for religious communities with the greatest needs. Ninety-three cents of every dollar aids elderly religious. While the response to the collection is unprecedented, so is the need. In 2010 alone, the total cost of care for women and men religious past age 70 exceeded $1 billion dollars. Nearly 5,000 religious required skilled care. At the same time, however, religious communities strive to minimize costs. In fact, the NRRO reports that the average cost of care for religious past age 70 dropped slightly this year. “The real challenge for many religious communities is a lack of retirement savings,” explained Sister Bader. “Most senior religious worked for years for small stipends. There were no retirement plans.” As religious continue to age, fewer members are able to serve in compensated ministry, leading to a sharp decrease in income. By 2019, National Religious Retirement Office data projects that retired religious will outnumber wage-earning religious by nearly four to one. For this reason, the NRRO implemented a comprehensive initiative to provide education, consultation and financial assistance to communities that are 50 percent or more underfunded for retirement. Since this program began in 2009, 55 communities, representing some 7,000 women and men religious, have initiated targeted strategies to address their funding shortfalls. “We’re working to ensure religious communities can care for their elder members today and tomorrow,” said Sister Bader. For more information, visit www.retiredreligious.org
Thursday, 01 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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The Bishop’s Society of Stewards held its annual dinner at Auletto Caterers on Tuesday, Nov. 29, to honor donors to the House of Charity — Bishop’s Annual Appeal. Testimonies of appreciation were offered by Father Richard Forbes on behalf of Sacred Heart Residence, Cherry Hill, and Brother Thomas Osorio for Archbishop Damiano School, Westville Grove. Msgr. Roger E. McGrath, vicar general of the Diocese of Camden, pointed out that the six Catholic Charities offices in the diocese also benefit from the House of Charity. Through their work, he said, “you, in essence, feed the poor, are a light in the darkness of despair, and warmth on the cold days and nights of winter. We know that by all of the funds given in utilities assistance.” The evening also saw the introduction of a new society, the Stewards of St. Katharine Drexel, for $100,000 or more in cumulative giving. In addition to Jim Auletto of Auletto Caterers, public thanks were expressed to Anthony Dintino, Sysco Foods; Jason Wilson, Samuels & Son Seafood Co.; Jerry Yost, U.S. Foods; and James McCarthy, Allied Beverage.
Thursday, 01 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Front Page of Newspaper/Latest Front Page Images
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Friday, 09 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
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Patrick M. George achieved the rank of Eagle Scout on Nov. 7. His project entailed leading other Scouts and adult volunteers in creating a sitting area and erecting a flag pole in a new park in Swedesboro.  They prepared the area, enclosed it with landscape timbers, dug four holes with the use of an auger, placed mulch and bushes, built and installed two benches set in concrete and installed a flag pole. Patrick is a member of the Youth Catholic Scouting Committee for the Camden Diocese and co-chair of our annual Catholic Scouting Spiritual Retreat. He is a member of Boy Scout Troop 13 – Swedesboro, Southern New Jersey Council. Jesuit Father Jeff Putthoff of Hopeworks in Camden recently spoke with the “Emerging Technology” graduate class at the Harvard School of Education. The two hour presentation covered Hopeworks in detail, addressing the socio-economic context of Camden and the dynamics of doing youth development with those in endemic poverty. Specifically, Father Putthoff addressed ways that technology helps to recover learning and how in the future possible applications of gamification will enable Hopeworks to reach more youth. The Hopeworks Holiday Open House will take place on Monday, Dec. 19, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, 09 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/School Briefs
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Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Carl Wilkins, who was in Rwanda during the genocide in 1994, speaks about his experiences there to students of Holy Spirit High School, Absecon, on Nov. 17. At their recent Academic Assembly, St. Mary School, Williamstown, honored teacher Ann Wade for her 40 years of service at St. Mary’s School. Wade currently teaches advanced math to St. Mary School students in grades sixth through eighth. She also teaches sixth through eighth students in St. Mary’s Higher Order Thinking (H.O.T.) program, which is designed to give practice in critical thinking skills through creative experiences in all academic disciplines. The Middles States Commissions on Elementary and Secondary Schools announces that St. Mary Magdalen Regional School, Millville, has been awarded accreditation by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. MSCESS accreditation signifies the educational community of St. Mary Magdalen Regional School has engaged in a rigorous process of developing self-knowledge; has hosted an evaluation team of independently appointed educators; and has created an on-going Strategic Plan to move school governed by a Steering Committee, chaired by Charlotte Corgliano, Patricia Cordero, and Teri Trasferini. Accreditation also signifies that Saint Mary Magdalen Regional School has met the Middle States Standards for a quality school. MSCEE, which works with public and private schools from New York State to the District of Columbia, in the U.S. Caribbean, and in various locations around the globe, represents two of the three accrediting Commissions of the over 100-year old Middle States Association.
Friday, 09 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
Hall of Fame Haddon Heights resident Terry Durkin was recently inducted into the Camden County Sports Hall of Fame. Durkin has been a teacher at St. Rose of Lima School for over four decades and has been an active member of the South Jersey basketball community as an official for many years. She has been involved with the West Chapter 5 Women’s Basketball Officials for the past 48 years. Since 1996, Durkin has also served as president of the Girls Division of the Al Carino Basketball Club. Wildwood Catholic Wildwood Catholic is proud to announce the hiring of Doug Tracey as the new lacrosse coach. Tracey will be the first lacrosse coach in the history of Wildwood Catholic which will first compete at the JV level and move to the varsity level once the team is ready for that level of play. Tracey comes from a program at Moorestown Friends. He played college lacrosse at Guilford and is looking forward to the opportunity to build the program from the ground up. St. Augustine On Saturday, Nov. 26, the St. Augustine Prep Baseball program was honored by the Hot Stovers Baseball Club of South Jersey at their 52nd Annual Banquet at Masso’s Columbus Manor in Williamstown. Coach Mike Bylone was presented a plaque on behalf of the team for their 2011 Non-Public A State Championship. Also receiving awards at the banquet were 2011 Prep graduates Ed Charlton and Matt Rakus for their 1st Team All-South Jersey selections. Charlton and Rakus are currently both attending New Jersey Institute of Technology on baseball scholarships.
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Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
Celebrating their championship wins last weekend, the high school football teams of St. Joseph (Hammonton) and Holy Spirit (Absecon) basked in the glory. The St. Joseph Wildcats mark their third straight championship, while at left, the Holy Spirit Spartans cheer the team’s second straight title, and third in the last five years. St. Joseph photo by Alan M. Dumoff; Holy Spirit photo by Jim Mooney
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
William John Kelly, 78, the father of Father William Kelly, O. Praem, died Sunday, Dec. 4. Kelly lived his entire life in Conshohocken, Pa., and was a lifelong member of St. Matthew Roman Catholic Church there. He served in the Korean War, and was a member of the Knights of Columbus. Three months ago, he retired from his job with the National Park Service at Valley Forge. Burial, with military honors, was at St. Benedict’s Cemetery in Conshohocken, Pa.
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News/Latest News
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Father Malachy Higgiston, who retired in Cherry Hill and once taught in Blackwood, died Tuesday, Nov. 15, at Virtua West Hospital, Voorhees. He was 88. Born in Belfast, Ireland, on Oct. 28, 1923, Father Higgiston became a U.S. citizen in 1953. He was ordained on Dec. 8, 1956. At the time St. Pius X Seminary was located in Blackwood, and Father Higgiston became a professor there. The seminary, which was on land now occupied by Camden County College, later closed. Father Higgiston was a U.S. Army veteran Lieutenant Colonel. He retired in 1988 after 22 years of honorable service, including as military chaplain serving in Vietnam. Father Higgiston received his master’s degree in theater from New York University in 1991. He then became the weekend assistant from 1989-2010 at St. Thomas More Church, Manalapan. He was a member of the Volantus Dei Institute. Father Higgiston was predeceased by his parents, Elizabeth and Dennis, and a brother and sister. He is survived by many loving friends including Leon Boddie, the Buckman family, Deacon Joseph Izzo, Msgr. Ed Alleyne, Father John Bambrick, Maureen Pohl and Patricia and Jim Duffy. The funeral Mass was celebrated Nov. 19 at St. Thomas More Church, Manalapan. Interment at St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Toms River.
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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Jessie Hornblum and Christine Vasello portray Adam and Eve in “The Nativity: A Meditation in Motion,” a pageant sponsored by Mary Mother of Mercy Parish, Glassboro, on Sunday, Dec. 4. Directed by Deacon Nick Mortelliti, the eight-act production begins with the Fall of Man and ends with The Nativity. The pageant was dedicated to the late Patrick Murray, whose recorded voice was used for the voice of God the Father.
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