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Author:Carmela Malerba
The Cathedral Kitchen will sponsor Harvest for Hunger, a wine tasting and auction on Friday, Nov. 2, 7-10 p.m., at the Collingswood Grand Ballroom. The honorary chair and auctioneer is Terry Ruggles of NBC10. More than 200 wines and microbrew beers will be available. The event will feature a live auction for wine, chefs’ tables and other prizes, including a trip to California wine country. The Cathedral Kitchen is located at 1514 Federal Street, Camden. The staff prepares meals fresh each day, using both purchased and donated food. Each night 15-18 volunteers come to help serve the meal. The organization also provides meals for off-site locations, including shelters, after-school programs, food pantries and smaller soup kitchens. Tickets for the Harvest for Hunger event are $65. For tickets and other information, go to the website: www.cathedralkitchen.org or contact Colleen Rini at 856-964-6771 or email colleen@cathedralkitchen.org
Thursday, 27 September 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Maria D'Antonio
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff  On Saturday April 25, special needs children, adults and their families came out to a free carnival on the parking lot of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Camden.  Over 300 enjoyed a sunny spring day with swings, slides, zoo animals and plenty of concessions. The event was sponsored by the Marlton Special Needs Karate Group, local businesses and the cathedral.  Johnson’s Fun Factory Amusements provided the entertainment, along with local donations from Camden businesses  
Thursday, 30 April 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Catherine M. Daiber (nee Brennan), 88, of Hilltop, and mother of Msgr. Sean Daiber, died Wednesday, Dec. 29. She was the wife of the late John A. She is survived by Msgr. Daiber, a priest of the Camden Diocese currently working in the missions in Goiania, Brazil; Teresa Baldauf and her husband Robert of Chews Landing; Mary Berkowsky and husband William of Jefferson, Ga.; Michael Daiber and wife Rhonda of Floyd, Va.; Margaret McManus and husband Gerald of Estero, Fla.; and Paul Daiber and wife Bernadette of Williamstown. She is also survived by grandchildren Kevin, Jerry, Collin, Joe, Christine and Travis; great-grandchildren Samantha, Matthew, Andrew, Madelyn, Maxwell, Megan, and John; brother John Brennan and wife Eileen; and brother-in-law William Egan. Mrs. Daiber was the owner of Cathy D.’s Ceramic Studio in Hilltop. A funeral Mass was celebrated on Tuesday, Jan. 4, at Our Lady of Hope Parish, St. Agnes Church, in Blackwood. Interment was at New St. Mary’s Cemetery, Bellmawr. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Catherine’s memory to the Alzheimer’s Association, 3 Eves Drive, Suite 310, Marlton, NJ 08053.
Thursday, 06 January 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Cathleen Sheridan, a parishioner of St. Simon Stock Parish in Berlin was recently awarded the 'Chick' McGinty Award for Excellence in Catechetical Ministry by the Trenton Diocese. Sheridan recently retired as the director of religious education at St. Mary of the Lakes, Medford. Previously she was the principal of St. Luke School in Stratford. She is pictured with Michael Fabian, associate director of the Ministry of Catechesis and Evangelization, and Father Douglas Freer, vicar of education, Diocese of Trenton.
Thursday, 03 January 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
CAMDEN — For 10 years, Chris Haw has been a resident of Camden Houses, a community he founded in the Waterfront South area of the city near to Sacred Heart Church and School. The husband, father, carpenter, potter, teacher and author is dedicated to helping Camden, having experienced its highs — seeing people come together to revitalize the city and help its residents — and lows. Like hearing gunshots just outside his door. As he sees it, Camden is a city on the “intersection of entropy and rebirth.” Haw’s new book, “From Willow Creek to Sacred Heart: Rekindling My Love For Catholicism,” chronicles his journey from the suburbs of Chicago as a youth, to his time now in Camden. His previous book, co-authored with Shane Claiborne, was “Jesus for President,” published in 2008. Baptized Catholic, Haw left the church in his youth, joining Willow Creek Community Church, an evangelical community, and eventually involved in the New Monasticism movement, a Protestant movement modeled on a monastic way of life. After studying in Belize, protesting the war in Iraq and spending time in jail, Haw came to Camden and began “worshipping at Sacred Heart Catholic Church — first as a visitor, then as a friend, and finally as a committed Catholic,” he writes. Along the way, Haw studied theology and sociology at Eastern University, St. David’s, Pa., and earned a master’s degree in theology and religious studies from Villanova. “I was not argued into Catholicism; I first showed up to it as a Protestant partner and co-laborer in the fields of Camden,” he writes. “Along the way, through experience and study, I came to appreciate and even love it. This book is more of a self-criticism — a criticism of the ways my prejudices against Catholicism had blurred my vision — while showing how I risked a vulnerable openness to something I had previously written off.” Worshipping at Sacred Heart, he found the “Catholic liturgy, and the Church history compelling.” In the intentional community Haw currently lives in, he and his family — wife Cassie and son Simon — share groceries, transportation, and other resources with fellow members. “We see each other as brothers and sisters, supporting each other, with a hopeful attitude” toward Camden, he said. Since his arrival in Camden, Haw has been a teacher at Sacred Heart elementary school, and now performs contracting work in the area. He also teaches classes at Cabrini College, Radnor, Pa. When explaining his conversion to Protestantism, and reversion back to Catholicism, Haw writes that he sees “the Catholic Church as a body whose problems are painfully obvious on the surface, but with gold embedded underneath. Conversely, the Protestantism I knew was pristinely appealing on the surface, yet I found that problems emerged once I dug below.” Published by Ave Maria Press, Haw’s book can be found on his website, www.chris-haw.com It is also available through Amazon and Barnes & Noble.
Thursday, 25 October 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
At Cherry Hill's Woodcrest Country Club on the morning of Nov. 8, Deacon Gerard Jablonowski spoke to CEOs and owners of mom-and-pop businesses about blending the Catholic faith in daily business practices. "It is essential that if we are to call ourselves ‘Catholic' and be real disciples of Christ, we can't lead a divided life, where our faith practices do not converge with our business practices," he said. Deacon Jablonowski, from Church of the Holy Family in Sewell, is familiar with the mix of faith and business. Until last September, he served 10 years as CEO at St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton. He spoke at the monthly breakfast for the Catholic Business Network of Southern New Jersey, a networking group that brings together businesses and individual professionals to share experiences, foster business ethics, and create networking opportunities, all while striving to apply the Catholic faith in the daily marketplace. Almost 40 individuals heard Deacon Jablonowski's words, which emphasized the reflection of Catholic values in business, and making sure business decisions are consistent with Catholic teaching, promote the common good, and allow the organization and external community to view the decision as part of their Catholic identity. These Catholic values, he stated, "must be evident in how we deal with every player...customers, colleagues, community, and our competitors." Upcoming Friday morning breakfasts, and speakers, for the Catholic Business Network of Southern New Jersey, held from 7:30-9 a.m. at Woodcrest Country Club, are: - Dec. 13, Deacon Leo McBlain; - Jan. 10, Andy Cooney; and - Feb. 14, Father Stephen Rapposelli. For further information, contact Sheila McGirl, founding member, at sjcbn@comcast.net
Thursday, 21 November 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
The Catholic Business Network has hosted several networking breakfasts with each one continuing to grow and attract new business people throughout the Diocese of Camden. Leadership is forming and some fundraising activities will be planned to support Catholic Schools in the South Jersey community. The next Catholic Business Network breakfast will be held on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014 at the Woodcrest Country Club, 300 East Evesham Road, Cherry Hill. A networking meeting begins at 7:30 a.m., followed by breakfast and guest speaker: International recording star Andy Cooney will speak about "God, Faith and the Music Business" (http://www.andycooney.com). In addition, Cooney has been involved with many successful efforts to increase awareness and raise funds for Catholic Education. The meeting will end around 9 a.m. The cost of breakfast is $20. For more information, please email SJCBN@comcast.net
Thursday, 19 December 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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What is CCHD? The Catholic Campaign for Human Development was founded in 1970 by the Catholic bishops of the United States as the Catholic Church’s domestic anti-poverty program. For nearly 40 years, CCHD has helped make long-term changes in the economic condition of communities across the United States. What differentiates the Catholic Campaign for Human Development from other church charities programs? CCHD is a complement to the direct-assistance mission of Catholic Charities agencies and other Church emergency relief programs. It helps make long-term changes in the economic condition of communities by supporting projects that address the root causes of poverty, such as racism, unemployment, lack of education and lack of economic opportunities What kind of initiatives does CCHD fund? CCHD funds programs where poor and marginalized people are empowered to make decisions, seek solutions to local problems and find ways to improve their lives and neighborhoods. Economic development initiatives help poor and low-income people develop new businesses, create new jobs and develop assets that are owned by families and communities. CCHD also provides educational opportunities for Catholics to learn about poverty interact with those affected by it and reflect on a faith response to it. How do initiatives get funded? Those who seek funding submit their applications through their local dioceses. Diocesan staff evaluate the projects and submit to the local bishop for approval. A national team reviews all applications submitted and, in consultation with the dioceses that recommended them, makes recommendations to the Bishops’ Subcommittee on the Catholic Campaign for Human Development. The Subcommittee decides which ones will receive national funding. Additionally, some projects are funded directly by the diocese from the 25 percent retained by the local diocese for smaller initiatives that are just starting out. Does CCHD fund exclusively Catholic initiatives? No, but CCHD guidelines explicitly state that in order to apply for CCHD funding the mission and actions of agencies seeking funding cannot be at odds with Catholic social teaching. Why doesn’t CCHD fund exclusively Catholic programs or initiatives? CCHD is deeply integrated into the life of the Catholic community. For example, in 2008, CCHD funded initiatives involved 683 Catholic priests, 776 Catholic parishes, 18 Catholic Charities agencies and 51 religious communities. Some of the programs funded include partnerships with other communities of faith and secular groups. As long as the mission and actions of the groups requesting funding are in agreement with Catholic social teaching, the bishops believe Catholics can partner with others in the community to address the root causes of poverty and injustice, and advance the cause of human dignity and development. What about recent allegations that CCHD funds groups openly in conflict with positions held by the Catholic Church? CCHD is always examining ways to strengthen and improve monitoring efforts to ensure that all grantees comply with CCHD criteria. This is an ongoing process, involving both local dioceses and national CCHD staff. We also hear from others who may bring to our attention concerns about groups or initiatives that CCHD is either considering for funding or currently funding. The CCHD Subcommittee and staff take seriously any allegation that groups are not in compliance with Catholic teaching or are participating in partisan political activity. CCHD immediately investigates each allegation in consultation with the local diocese and, if the allegations are confirmed, discontinues funding immediately. Out of the 250 grantees for 2009, how many groups have been found non-compliant? Out of 250 grantees in 2009, there were three credible allegations. In one case, a group was found to be in support of abortion and had already been de-funded when an allegation brought their name to our attention. In the other two cases, the groups had taken actions in conflict with CCHD’s guidelines after they were funded. Without the knowledge of the local diocese or CCHD, they produced voter guides that took positions on referenda opposed to Catholic teaching on same-sex marriage and, in one case, on parental notification and abortion. As soon as these facts were confirmed, and after consultation with the local diocese, the groups were de-funded. Charges against two other groups named were investigated and, in consultation with the local dioceses, the charges were found to be inaccurate or based on a misunderstanding. In all five cases prompt and decisive action was taken consistent with CCHD’s policies and practices. In the past, funding also has been withdrawn promptly when allegations of political partisanship or mismanagement of funds were substantiated. Who is being funded by CCHD? A list of recent grantees and other information about CCHD is at www.usccb.org/cchd/grants. Persons seeking further information may call the Catholic Campaign for Human Development at 202-541-3210.
Thursday, 19 November 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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How God speaks to his people and how Jesus’ disciples listen and discern his voice was the focus of the annual New Jersey Catholic Charismatic Conference held June 13-15 in Union Catholic High School, Scotch Plains. More than 350 people from around the state enthusiastically praised the Lord and heard speakers examine, explain and exhort them to take up the challenge of the conference theme – “Can you HEAR me? Signed, Jesus” – in his call to love one another in every situation of life. The weekend included daily Liturgy of the Eucharist, workshop sessions, Eucharistic adoration, an evening healing service conducted by Father John Campoli, a priest of the Voluntas Dei Institute and director of His Love Ministries, an international intercessory prayer ministry, and a Life in the Spirit Seminar.
Thursday, 26 June 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Author:Admin2
In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, Inc. is coordinating relief and recovery efforts throughout the Diocese, and particularly in Atlantic and Cape May Counties. If you would like to support Catholic Charities as it responds to the disaster, contributions can be sent to: Catholic Charities, Hurricane Sandy Fund, 1845 Haddon Avenue, Camden, New Jersey 08103.  All funds will be used for relief and recovery efforts in the Diocese.
Friday, 02 November 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, Inc., recently announced the 2012 Justice for ALL honorees. This year’s honorees include Thomas A. Cavalieri, D.O., Ann M. Budde and Deacon William Johnson. Joseph Balzano will be recognized posthumously. In its ninth year, the Justice for ALL Dinner recognizes individuals and groups who exemplify outstanding spirit of community, social justice and goodwill. Each year, awards are given in the areas of leadership, parish/community ministry, social ministry and social justice. This year’s Justice for ALL Honorees: Dr. Thomas A. Cavalieri of Mullica Hill is the recipient of The Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio Award for Leadership. “In every facet of this life, Thomas Cavalieri, D.O., has shown a strong commitment to his faith, his profession, his family and the people to whom he brings medical service,” Catholic Charities said in announcing the award. “As a geriatric educator and clinician, he has been an advocate for older adults for more than 25 years, raising the standard of care for them and helping the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s School of Osteopathic Medicine (UMDNJ-SOM) to achieve national recognition in the field of geriatrics.” Dr. Cavalieri currently serves as dean of UMDNJ-SOM, professor of medicine and endowed chair for Primary Care Research. He previously served as the director of the New Jersey Institute for Successful Aging (formerly the Center for Aging, where he was Founding Director) and chair of the Department of Medicine. Ann M. Budde of Bridgeton is the recipient of The Sister Grace Nolan Award for Social Ministry A woman of many firsts Budde was the first woman to become vice president of a non-Catholic hospital in New Jersey, the first woman inducted into the Bridgeton Rotary, and the first woman president of the Cumberland County Board of Vocational Education. Budde is also an inductee in the Cumberland County Women’s Hall of Fame, has served as chair of the South Jersey Hospital Board, and has chaired numerous positions with United Way, March of Dimes, Research Club of Bridgeton and many other organizations. Currently, Budde serves as director of the Good Shepherd Dining Room Soup Kitchen, which feeds more than 21,000 people in need in the Cumberland County community each year. Deacon William Johnson of Bridgeton is the recipient of The Peter J. O’Connor Award for Social Justice Deacon Johnson was the first African-American ordained as a deacon in the Diocese of Camden and served as deacon in his home parish of St. Teresa of Avila in Bridgeton. Deacon Johnson also served as an advocate and canonical consultant to the tribunal and chair of the former Black Catholic Ministry Board. He was appointed as the first director of the Office for Black Catholic Ministry and later served as chair of the former Racial Justice Committee. Under his leadership and guidance, the Racial Justice Committee embarked on racial justice training for the diocese and led the efforts of others to become certified in order to continue to provide the training. Joseph Balzano is the posthumous recipient of The Msgr. Michael Doyle and Msgr. Robert McDermott Award for Parish and Community Ministry The late Joseph Balzano began his career at the Port of Camden in 1951 as an office clerk and equipment operator. In 1989, he was appointed as the South Jersey Port Corporation’s executive director and chief executive officer. For more than five decades, Balzano was a major force in the City of Camden, spearheading port expansion and economic development and fighting tirelessly for Camden’s less-fortunate residents. He was an active and dedicated member of Sacred Heart Church, remembered for his yearly Christmas tree and countless other generosities. During Balzano’s lifetime, he received countless awards and recognition for his legendary port operations expertise and his contributions to the community at large. The 2012 Annual Justice for ALL Dinner, presented by The Daniels Group, Inc., will take place at Adelphia Grand Ballroom in Deptford on Wednesday, April 25, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $95 per person. All proceeds will be used to provide direct assistance to clients in all six counties of the diocese: Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem. The 2011 Justice for ALL dinner raised more than $145,000, which in turn, enabled Catholic Charities to provide direct assistance to end crises, create stabilization within families, prevent eviction and utility disconnection, fulfill prescription needs and provide food to more than 1,800 families and individuals throughout the six counties of the Diocese of Camden. For more information on tickets or sponsorship opportunities, contact Giovina Price at 856-583-6126 or visit www.CatholicCharitiesCamden.org
Thursday, 15 March 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Camden has been awarded a $744,740 grant from the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs to conduct a one-year program to address the needs of low-income veterans in six counties of South Jersey. The program is dubbed “Ready, Vet, Go” and will focus on housing needs. During the one-year program, Catholic Charities intends to contact at least 1,250 low-income veterans and their families. About half of these are expected to be from Camden County, with the others divided among the five other counties of South Jersey. The goal of “Ready, Vet, Go” will be to provide at least 400 veterans and their families with case management services focused on those at risk of becoming homeless. The program will also provide almost $180,000 in temporary financial assistance to veterans and their families who are waiting for approved VA benefits. These temporary payments would be in the form of rental payments, utility payments, security and utility deposits, moving costs and public transportation expenses. Other parts of the program will focus on placing low-income veterans and their families in permanent housing and placement in jobs or job-training programs.
Thursday, 04 August 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Catholic Charities will once again be accepting applications for its Bridge to Your Future Program. Bridge to Your Future is an intensive program designed to help those who live in Camden County and are struggling to manage their finances and who have needed the assistance of charities or public agencies in the past. Those who are accepted into the program must demonstrate a high degree of motivation and strongly desire to rely on their own abilities to manage their financial lives. Applicants are asked to set goals which could include learning how to get out of debt, improving job seeking skills, passing the GED in order to be eligible to earn more money, and even home ownership. Those selected to participate in the program will be assigned a case manager who will coach and counsel them along the way. A statement from Catholic Charities about the program says that Bridge to Your Future involves a big commitment of time and energy (weekly phone calls, monthly appointments and attendance at workshops), but for those who participate, the rewards can be great. Call Sylvia Loumeau at 856-342-4162 for more information.
Thursday, 25 June 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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For the fifth consecutive year, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, hosted its annual “Justice for ALL” Awards Dinner. The event, held April 24 at the Adelphia Grand Ballroom in Deptford, is designed to honor individuals and groups who embody the spirit of community, commitment to charitable works and dedication to social justice. With the unseasonably warm weather, guests were able to enjoy an evening on the verandah while listening to Camden’s UCC Royal Brass Band, which played New Orleans style jazz music, symbolic of one of the evening’s team honorees — Project One — which spent countless hours cleaning up the Hurricane Katrina site in Louisiana. The other honorees were Jim Murray, former General Manager of the Philadelphia Eagles football team; Domenic Vallone, one of the founders of the Cathedral Kitchen in Camden; and Camden Churches Organized for People.
Friday, 02 May 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Author:Admin2
In his statement on immigration reform, “Every Person Is A Neighbor,” Bishop Joseph A. Galante reminds people of their commonality in this busy, changing world. Catholic Charities sees the ministry of welcoming neighbors everywhere — some are newcomers to the United States, New Jersey or the Diocese of Camden, whereas others may have lived here for a long time because others journeyed before them. Catholic Charities strives to introduce parishioners and residents who are newcomers to their new neighbors and vice versa, so that all can join together in community. To act as a bridge to community connections, Catholic Charities has begun collecting migration stories. Do you have a migration story from your own experience or that of a family member? By emailing your story to migrationstories@camdendiocese.org, you can be included in a collection of narratives. These stories will be compiled on the Catholic Charities website, www.catholiccharitiescamden.org. Stories are already being collected from the various countries that are highlighted in this year’s Operation Rice Bowl, the Lenten Reflection Tool from Catholic Relief Services. For more information on the Migration Story Project, contact Catholic Charities at migrationstories@camdendiocese.org.
Thursday, 26 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput and Bishop Dennis Sullivan celebrate Mass in the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter & Paul July 22 as part of the CCUSA regional gathering in Philadelphia. Also pictured is Deacon Vincent A. Okoro of St. Andrew the Apostle Parish, Gibbsboro. Photo by Alan M. Dumoff, more photos ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com PHILADELPHIA - More than 300 individuals dedicated to serving the poor and needy came together July 29-30 here at the Sheraton Downtown Hotel for Catholic Charities USA's (CCUSA) regional Partners in Excellence Conference. CCUSA is the national office for Catholic Charities agencies and affiliates nationwide and serves more than 10 million people annually, regardless of their religious, social or economic backgrounds. Participants for the two-day conference included Catholic Charities workers from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia; the Allentown, Scranton-Wilkes Barre and Harrisburg dioceses in Pennsylvania; and the Camden, Metuchen and Trenton dioceses in New Jersey. The event included a keynote presentation by Father Larry Snyder, CCUSA president; workshops; and Mass celebrated by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput of Philadelphia and Bishop Dennis Sullivan. "The work you do day in and day out is critical," Father Snyder stressed in his Monday morning keynote, and he expressed his wish that the conference help attendees "do the Lord's work with new energy." Father Snyder mixed in statistics, theology and history in his talk, emphasizing the importance of reducing poverty in the United States. He urged all to continue the work that began in the United States in 1727, when the Ursuline Sisters arrived to New Orleans from France to open an orphanage, school and health facility. Their arrival marked the first formal Catholic charity in the U.S. In 1910, the National Conference of Catholic Charities (now CCUSA) was founded to promote the creation of diocesan Catholic charities organizations, creating "a sense of solidarity" and becoming "an attorney for the poor." Today, about 46.2 million people live in poverty, representing 15 percent of the population, Father Snyder said. To reduce poverty, he advocated changing the social service delivery system, engaging the business world, and developing individual opportunity plans to prevent people from falling further into poverty. The priest referred to the book of Genesis ("every person is made in the image and likeness of God, and therefore is worthy of dignity and respect"), and the story of the Good Samaritan. He also referenced Pope Benedict XVI's 2005 encyclical Deus Caritas Est ("God Is Love"), which called for a "formation of the heart," recognizing that those who need our help deserve respect, dignity and love. "Our lives are meant to be given to others," Father Snyder said. "We have to take the Gospel, and apply it to our lives, every day." Since joining CCUSA in 2005, Father Snyder has been a leader in the overall direction of the Catholic Charities movement. In 2007, he was named to the Pontifical Council Cor Unum, which oversees the church's charitable activities. In 2009, President Barack Obama appointed him to the President's Advisory Council of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. After Father Snyder's talk, the presentation of Social Innovation Awards took place, and the Diocese of Camden's Catholic Charities organization received $5,000 for its Community Resource Warehouse. The community warehouse was launched in 1990 to collect useful building supplies, furniture, household items, and clothing and make them available to the public at low cost. Aligning the mission of the warehouse with the Catholic social teaching doctrines of The Dignity of the Human Person and Rights & Responsibilities, a modest fee is charged for the items sold to the public. The program is geared to individuals and families who are displaced because of flood, fire or other disaster; women and children displaced because of domestic violence; refugee families resettling into the diocese; and others in the community that are in need of affordable used furniture or household items. The $5,000 will go to such initiatives as the upcoming job training program, where participants will receive training in areas of warehouse management, furniture repair and refurbishment, and small engine repair; and to outfit the warehouse for tools, parts and supplies, safety equipment, and improvements to the building, or other operational purposes.
Thursday, 01 August 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Kevin Hickey, executive director for Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Camden; Jennifer Dyer, assistant director; and board president Father Thomas Newton, with Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, Archbishop Emeritus of Washington, are pictured at the National Press Club during a two-day Catholic Charities event in Washington, D.C. Oct. 13-14. Leaders of Catholic Charities agencies from Hawaii, to the Virgin Islands, including representatives from the Diocese of Camden, gathered in Washington, D.C. for a two-day event, highlighting their organizations’ commitment to substantive poverty reduction. On Oct. 13, 150 Catholic Charities directors, board members, and staff gathered at the National Press Club for dinner and a discussion, moderated by the National Journal’s Major Garrett, on innovative poverty reduction strategies. The following day, attendees were welcomed to the Eisenhower Executive Office Building by Melody Barnes, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council. The morning session touched on a wide array of topics, from jobs and the economy, the Affordable Care Act and its implementation, immigration, military families, and religious freedom. After a tour of the White House, the program concluded with breakout sessions delving into policy topics.
Thursday, 27 October 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Christine Polit
The need for food donations in the South Jersey community continues to grow as more and more families struggle to provide adequate food. According to statistics provided by Feeding America, 12.7 percent of New Jersey’s population (over 1.1 million people) is food insecure. Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, offers food assistance through our food pantry sites in Atlantic City, Rio Grande, Vineland, Penns Grove and Westville. Like many local food pantries, Catholic Charities faces an ongoing challenge to meet the growing need for food assistance. John Desparrois, administrator for Catholic Charities’ Family and Community Service Centers, explains: “The new face of poverty arrives at our doors daily, those who have never experienced a food shortage in their homes; the choice between heating and eating, electric or not brings folks to us for the most basic need of food.” In response to the ongoing struggle to meet this need for food assistance, Catholic Charities is participating in the 2012 Feinstein Challenge. This Challenge, sponsored by the Feinstein Foundation, distributes $1 million to hunger-fighting agencies nationwide. The more we raise between March 1 and April 30 (through financial donations or food donations), the greater the award we will receive from the Foundation. Donations are being accepted at six Catholic Charities locations throughout South Jersey. Please contact the donation site closest to you to find out how you can help: Atlantic City (609-345-3448), Rio Grande (609-886-2662), Vineland (856-691-1841), Penns Grove (856-299-1296), Westville (856-845-9200), and Camden (856-308-0497). Financial donations can also be mailed to Catholic Charities, Attention: Feinstein Challenge, 1845 Haddon Avenue, Camden, NJ 08103. For more information about the Feinstein Challenge or how Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden is fighting hunger in South Jersey, contact Christine Polit at 856-308-0497 or Christine.polit@camdendiocese.org Christine Polit, MPH, is Public Health Community Outreach Program Developer, Catholic Charities.
Thursday, 22 March 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Kevin H. Hickey, executive director of Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, Inc., was recently elected chair of Catholic Charities USA's Council of Diocesan Directors. His appointment will take effect at Catholic Charities USA's conference in Alexandria, Va., taking place from April 2-3. Catholic Charities USA (CCUSA) is the national office for Catholic Charities agencies nationwide. The Council of Diocesan Directors allows Catholic Charities directors from across the country to provide input and coordination between Catholic Charities USA and local agencies and directors. The council also provides leadership development to its members, and perspective and opinion to Catholic Charities on the formulation of new programs and advocacy positions. Hickey has been executive director of the Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Camden for the past 12 years. Prior to assuming his current position, he was director of Catholic Charities in Memphis, Tenn., from 1997 to 2002. He has has held social work positions in South Dakota, Chicago, West Virginia and Connecticut. As executive director of Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Camden, which comprises the six southern counties of New Jersey, he leads a staff of 80. In the past year and a half Catholic Charities has been heavily involved in Hurricane Sandy relief and recovery efforts. In the first 30 days of relief operations Catholic Charities served 15,000 people affected by the storm. On an annual basis, Catholic Charities serves more than 32,000 New Jerseyans. Recently, the agency was one of 85 non-profits in the United States awarded a VA grant to prevent homelessness among veterans. Hickey was recently conferred the papal honor Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice by Pope Benedict XVI. Also in 2012 Hickey was selected by his United Way agency peers as executive director of the Year for Atlantic County, and honored by Building ONE New Jersey as the Moral Leader of the Year for 2012. He is a graduate of The University of Chicago and St. Louis University.
Thursday, 27 March 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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According to the Rutgers Center for State Health Policy, there are 279,000 uninsured children in New Jersey eligible for the NJ Family Care Program, which offers free or low-cost health coverage for uninsured children 18 and younger, as well as for some low-income parents. Children who have health insurance are more likely to be healthy as newborns, more likely to receive needed vaccinations as toddlers, and more likely to do better in school and miss fewer days. The cost of health insurance may be out of reach to some hard-working families in New Jersey.  But now, many families can get free or low-cost health insurance for their children through the NJ Family Care Program. The NJ Family Care program already covers more than a half million New Jersey children, and includes coverage for regular doctor visits, hospital stays, specialists, prescriptions, and mental health services, as well as dental and vision. Children in a household of four earning up to $6432 per month ($77,184 a year) may qualify for coverage, and most immigrants whose documents allow them to live in the United States permanently are eligible. Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Camden is now an enrollment site for the New Jersey Family Care Program and offers individual assistance to families interested in completing an application. To find out if your family qualifies for Family Care and to learn how to apply, or to arrange an information session about NJ Family Care, contact Christine Polit at 856-342-4796.
Thursday, 30 July 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden is the 2008 recipient of the Arnold Andrews Award for Collaborative Excellence given by Ministering Together, a collaboration of national Catholic organizations encouraging church partnerships in the provision of health, social services, education and pastoral care. Catholic Charities was recognized for its Project One, which sent 600 people to the Gulf Coast to assist in recovery efforts from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  Project One got underway in May, 2006. The last team went to New Orleans in April, 2008. Following Hurricane Katrina, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden created Project One to respond to the needs of those most affected by the hurricane, while providing opportunities for parishioners to live out the church’s call to solidarity.
Thursday, 18 September 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff, more photos ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com                   John L. Allen, Jr., senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter, speaks at the 10th Justice for ALL dinner sponsored by Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Camden. The event was held April 25 at the Adelphia Ballroom in Deptford.     DEPTFORD — “You are the superstars of the Catholic Church. You make the church present to the marginalized, abandoned, and forgotten.” These were the words of journalist John L. Allen, Jr., keynote speaker, to the 400-plus in attendance at the 10th annual Justice for ALL Awards Dinner here at the Adelphia Grand Ballroom on April 25. Organized by Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Camden, the evening raised more than $100,000 for the faith-based agency’s work in providing social services and advocating for the poor, oppressed and vulnerable. Leading off the evening was Bishop Dennis Sullivan, who echoed the words of Pope Francis and encouraged his listeners to “be the protectors of the poorest, weakest, and least important.” Calling Catholic social teaching “the hidden Gospel,” Bishop Sullivan reflected on his time as a priest on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, helping immigrants build their lives. “The agenda is set” for us, Bishop Sullivan said. Camden Emeritus Bishop Joseph Galante was honored for his work in promoting charity and justice, and being a champion for such causes as immigration reform, abolishment of the death penalty and affordable housing. Accepting the award to a standing ovation, Bishop Galante spoke of his formative years as a young priest in the diocese of Brownsville, Texas, a poor border town, and learning Spanish, while under the leadership of Bishop (later Boston Cardinal) Humberto Medeiros. Seeing Bishop Medeiros, a Portuguese immigrant, fight for the rights of Mexican-American workers, he said, inspired him to do the same, and advocate for immigrant’s rights. “I learned, from (Bishop Medeiros’) example, to have a heart for the poor and powerless, marginalized, suffering, and forgotten,” Bishop Galante said. Among those in attendance to support the work of Catholic Charities was Audubon native, and Super Bowl-wining MVP for the Baltimore Ravens, Joe Flacco, with his wife, Dana. Guest speaker John Allen is senior correspondent for the lay Catholic newspaper the National Catholic Reporter and serves as senior Vatican analyst for CNN. He has authored several books, including two on Joseph Ratzinger, one when he was prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, and one after he became Pope Benedict XVI. Remarking that the church is “in a season of change, both exhilarating and unsettling, with new possibilities and challenges,” Allen urged the audience to “face these challenges with humor,” calling it a “winning strategy for Catholic life.” He recalled his recent visit to Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, now Pope Francis ministered. Since his election, the Holy Father has urged Catholics to not forget the poor and vulnerable. Allen met poor residents surviving in the slums and shanties. For almost all of these residents, he said, Cardinal Bergoglio had interacted with them personally and tended to their needs. Caring for the poor will be “the spirit of his pontificate,” Allen predicted. Serving as master of ceremonies for the evening was Father Thomas A. Newton, pastor of the Catholic Community of Christ Our Light, Cherry Hill.    
Thursday, 02 May 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Camden is working to Wipe Out Lead in Camden County.  Even a small amount of lead can cause serious health problems in children, such as behavior problems, learning difficulties, hearing problems, brain damage, hyperactivity, anemia, and slowed growth and development. Children are most often exposed to lead through exposure to lead-based paint, which was used in homes built before 1978. Other sources of exposure to lead include soil, dust, air and water.  Tests are available for families to determine if there is lead dust present in their home. In addition to having their homes tested for lead, there are steps families can take to prevent childhood lead poisoning, including: — Taking children for regular medical checkups — Washing toys and pacifiers frequently — Maintaining a diet high in fiber, iron, calcium and vitamin C — Running the cold water from the tap for one minute before using — Dusting and mopping with a damp cloth/mop — Washing children’s hands frequently — Not allowing children to play in dirt — Keeping children away from peeling or chipping paint. While children living in urban areas are at increased risk for lead poisoning, it poses a danger for all children. Through the Wipe Out Lead New Jersey Program, sponsored by the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, Catholic Charities is offering free kits to families that test for the presence of lead dust in the home. Over 180 homes in Camden County have already been tested. To be eligible for a free kit, families must live in Camden County and live in a home or apartment built before 1978.  The test kit will be completed in a five-10 minute visit to the home and is analyzed by a professional laboratory. To arrange to have a free test done in your home, contact Christine Polit at 856-278-2608. Also, contact Ms. Polit if you would like a free lead education seminar for your parish or community group. 
Thursday, 23 April 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
CAMDEN — Thanking the Diocese of Camden’s Catholic Charities for “your incredible work, and the miracles you do each and every day,” Father Larry Snyder, president of Catholic Charities USA, visited Catholic Charities’ offices here Nov. 14 to offer support and encouragement for those working to help victims of Hurricane Sandy. Father Snyder spoke at a luncheon  and was scheduled to travel to Northfield later that day to visit St. Gianna Beretta Molla Parish, one of the  distribution sites set up to aid victims of the late October storm. With Kim Burgo, senior director of Disaster Operations for Catholic Charities USA, Father Snyder planned to visit South Jersey until the end of the week. Father Synder — who has headed the organization since 2005, the year of  Hurricane Katrina — spoke about the work of Catholic Charities USA, which is the national office for Catholic Charities agencies nationwide, and its support to more than 10 million people every year. “Our (Catholic) faith compels us, to do what we do,” he said. Directing his words to the Diocese of Camden’s Catholic Charities, Father Snyder said that he came to the area “to salute all of you, for the work you’ve done in responding” to the need in South Jersey. Presenting the agency with a check for $10,000, from Catholic Charities USA to assist in the effort, Father Snyder promised more in the future, and asked the diocesan agency to let him know “what you need, how we can help you.” During the luncheon, the Catholic Charities agency in Camden was also presented with a check for $2,500 from the Apostolic Nunciature in Washington, D.C. Msgr. Roger McGrath, vicar general for the diocese, gave the check to Kevin Hickey, executive director of Catholic Charities for the diocese, and read the letter from Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, the nuncio to the United States.
Thursday, 15 November 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Camden will receive a $800,648 grant from Catholic Charities USA, to aid the diocesan organization in helping those affected by last fall’s Hurricane Sandy. In October 2012, the super-storm Hurricane Sandy knocked out power and flooded large portions of the New Jersey-New York coast, toppling trees and destroying many homes and businesses. According to a report from The Associated Press, the storm caused about $62 billion in damage and other losses in the U.S. — primarily in New York and New Jersey — making it the second-costliest storm in U.S. history after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. As of March 5, more than 258,000 families have applied for FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) assistance in New Jersey. The number of applications from two counties in the Diocese of Camden, Atlantic and Cape May, represent more than 5 percent of the total populations of each county. Since the storm’s landfall, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden has been working with local partners, sister agencies throughout the state, and Catholic Charities USA to respond compassionately to those affected. Current long-term recovery efforts are a follow up to the immediate assistance Catholic Charities provided in the storm’s aftermath. Five days after Sandy’s impact, Catholic Charities opened distribution centers at Notre Dame de la Mer in North Wildwood, and at St. Gianna Beretta Molla Parish in Northfield, to provide much-needed supplies to 15,000 individuals. Remaining open for 19 consecutive days, the centers also gave Catholic Charities the opportunity to assess on-going needs, and almost 400 volunteers distributed 136,000 pounds of goods directly to individuals, and into impacted communities. Today, more than 25 percent of the 679 families in FEMA’s transitional shelter program are from Cape May and Atlantic counties. “When Superstorm Sandy turned the lives of so many in New Jersey upside down, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Camden was a vital source of immediate help and hope to those without food or shelter due to the storm,” said Father Larry Snyder, president of Catholic Charities USA. “Long-term recovery efforts are now underway, and thanks to the tremendous generosity of thousands of donors from across our nation, Catholic Charities USA is able to award disaster recovery grants to agencies impacted by the fury of Sandy,” Father Snyder said. “We are proud to be able to support Catholic Charities of Camden and all of our agencies in severely afflicted areas in their continued great work of helping families and communities strengthen and rebuild in the wake of disaster.” Long-term recovery efforts for Catholic Charities in the Diocese of Camden include helping families with financial assistance; helping families return home or find affordable housing; and, through social media and community meetings, being a source of effective communication for victims. Catholic Charities also promotes  the church’s social teaching and provides volunteer opportunities. “One of the wonderful aspects to working in Catholic Charities is the opportunity to see how many different people and organizations come together on behalf of a common goal,” said Kevin Hickey, executive director of Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden. “I think our immediate response to Hurricane Sandy, and now the long-term recovery work, are examples of many people, staff and parishioners, and organizations coming together to respond,” he said. “We are especially grateful to Catholic Charities USA for this grant, as well as their assistance in helping us develop our disaster response programs. The reason we have been able to comprehensively respond to the effects of Hurricane Sandy is because of the training and real-time disaster response experiences we have received through our partners at Catholic Charities USA.”
Thursday, 11 April 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
For 40 years Msgr. Michael Mannion has devoted his service as a priest to his community, children in need, pilgrims, refugees and countless others who felt hopeless and lost. He’s built community homes from the ground up, advanced his studies in Rome, counseled people in need in war-torn Uganda and served alongside Mother Teresa in the streets of Kolkata, formerly known as Calcutta, in India. His passport shows the stamps of 30-plus countries, but if you asked Msgr. Mannion what his most significant journey was, he’d likely say, “learning about so many different situations in life and throughout these years — which combined — have allowed me to become a better priest and servant to God.” Born and raised in Camden County, Msgr. Mannion remembers his family’s strong values and early influence on him through praying the rosary daily and attending Mass each Sunday. In first grade at St. Cecilia’s in Pennsauken, Msgr. Mannion struggled with keeping his attention on his studies. Consequently he repeated the first grade — at public school, Amon Heights — based on his mother’s decision. Although his early elementary education through the church was a challenge, Msgr. Mannion felt his calling as early as high school, where he attended minor seminary at Mother of the Savior Seminary High School in Blackwood. He set off to pursue his college studies by trekking north and west to Mount St. Paul College in Waukesha, Wis. It was there that a community service project prompted his desire to serve others. “We built Discovery House, which is an amazing facility catering to young people with special needs — everything from spina bifida, Down syndrome, those in wheelchairs and more — and the mission of the house was to help families in need,” Msgr. Mannion says.  “It was through that project that I felt a greater calling and really felt I was doing God’s work.” He expected to begin seminary in the Washington Metropolitan Area, but instead headed to Italy, where he studied at Gregorian University in Rome. “During that time I worked on the streets, supporting the nuns with their work — ranging from fixing mud huts to tutoring others,” he explains.  One day Msgr. Mannion was directed to pick up “some nun,” a leader to the ones he had been working alongside of in the streets. “I was happy to do so — I had a motorcycle at the time,” he says with a glint in his eye.  “Fortunately, I was given a vehicle and that passenger turned out to be Mother Teresa —someone who had a tremendous impact on millions around the world — including me.” He was encouraged to visit Mother Teresa in India during some of its most war-torn days. “When the good people of Rome heard about this, there was $500 left at the doorstep of the seminary, so I could take those funds and help the people of India in their time of need,” he remembers. He was ordained a priest in Rome, receiving his first assignment in St. Ann Church in Westville, where he fondly recalls his days heading up an active youth program. The program began with a handful of children and quickly grew because “it was such a positive social atmosphere for the kids, where they were free to be themselves outside of school and their cliques.” Msgr. Mannion spoke at the National Right to Life event in 1983 and two years later he wrote his first book, “Abortion & Healing … A Cry To Be Whole,” which focused on post-abortion healing. “It’s funny, whenever I hesitated about anything or wasn’t sure from the beginning, such as my invitation to study for the priesthood in Rome, I look back and realize those events turned out to be the most influential experiences of my life,” he says.   “Coincidences are God’s way of being anonymous,” Msgr. Mannion says. “Whether he’s serving the people in the Diocese of Camden or someone in a country on the other side of the world, Msgr. Mannion provides compassion, hope and words of comfort to those whose lives he touches,” says Kevin Hickey, executive director, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden. “We’re delighted to present him with the Sister Grace Nolan Award for Social Ministry in recognition of his tremendous service, commitment and embodiment of God’s work.” The 2011 Annual Justice for ALL Dinner will take place at Adelphia Grand Ballroom in Deptford on Thursday, April 28, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $95 per person. All proceeds will be used to provide direct assistance to clients in all six counties of the diocese: Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem. For more information on tickets or sponsorship opportunities, call Giovina Price, 856-583-6126, or visit www.CatholicCharitiesCamden.org.
Thursday, 07 April 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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You see the reports on the news every night: another community in turmoil, another country at war, another person hurting, another human being in need of help. It is easy to become indifferent to those dail ymedia reports of the millions of people around the world in need. Not if you ask any of the more than 600-strong volunteer members of Project ONE. Who are they? Project ONE is a diocesan-wide project comprised of volunteers who took the initiative to support the clean-up effort of the Gulf Region in the wake of the destruction of Hurricane Katrina. In many cases, long after the cameras and press went away, the Project ONE teams were still there working.
Thursday, 10 April 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Author:Admin2
CAMDEN — There is a well-known saying in Jewish tradition that “saving one life is like saving the entire world.” This was a belief deeply imbedded in David Ravitz when he arrived in the United States at the turn of the 20th century and has since been handed down through generations of his family. Moving to America in the early 1900s, David and his father came to this country to escape the tyranny facing Jews in Russia at that time. Together they worked tirelessly to earn enough money to bring the rest of his family to Philadelphia, their new home. David began selling apples from a cart parked around the corner from Temple University. The apple cart grew to be a corner store where David’s son, Stanley, learned and grew the family business. And to quote another famous saying, “The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” After years of running the corner store in Philadelphia, Stanley moved to New Jersey and expanded the business again. Over time, the small apple cart has grown to include six ShopRite supermarkets in the South Jersey area. Always committed to family and faith, in 1996 Stanley and his wife, Doris, gave tangible life to yet another Jewish tradition known as Tzedaka, or charity, when they founded the Ravitz Family Foundation. The Ravitz Family Foundation’s mission is to aid children and families in need. Those are concise words for a complex cause. On a daily basis they receive requests from local charitable organizations and have supported everything from afterschool programs, to summer field trips for needy children, to aiding families who may not be able to provide sufficient shelter for themselves. To this day the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Stanley and Doris Ravitz are committed to carrying out the foundation’s mission — “as a family for families.” “If we can make someone’s day better or load lighter, we want to do that. It makes my family feel good and it makes me feel great,” said Steve Ravitz, family spokesperson. “We love to help people. It’s not just what we do, it’s who we are.” On April 28, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, will present the Ravitz Family with the Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio Award for Leadership at its annual Justice for ALL Awards Dinner. “It’s with great pleasure that we acknowledge the Ravitz family’s passion and dedication to helping others,” said Kevin Hickey, executive director of Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden Inc. “Generations of the Ravitzes have made making a difference a family affair and have shown themselves to be leaders in their service and commitment to the poor, the vulnerable and those without a voice.” The 2011 Justice for ALL Dinner will take place at Adelphia Grand Ballroom in Deptford on Thursday, April 28, at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $95 per person. All proceeds will be used to provide direct assistance to clients in all six counties of the diocese: Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem. For more information on tickets or sponsorship opportunities, call Giovina Price, 856-583-6126, or visit www.CatholicCharitiesCamden.org.
Thursday, 14 April 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Giovina Price
Each year for the past eight years, Catholic Charities has hosted an annual awards dinner to honor ordinary people in the community who do extraordinary things in the diligent pursuit of social justice. You may be wondering more about what Catholic Charities does, who the event honors and where the money raised by the Justice for ALL Awards Dinner goes. Well, wonder no more. After an interview with Kevin Hickey, executive director of Catholic Charities, here’s what we learned. What is the mission of Catholic Charities? Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden is a faith-based agency rooted in the Gospel and in the social teaching of the Catholic Church. We provide social services to, advocate for, and empower the poor, oppressed or vulnerable. We do this on a non-discriminatory, non-sectarian basis throughout the six southern New Jersey counties. More importantly all of our work and programs are, as Pope Benedict said in Deus Caritas Est, “a way of making present here and now the love which man always needs.” What is the vision of Catholic Charities? Rooted in the Gospel and Catholic Social Teaching, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Camden seeks to transform the lives of people in need, with a special emphasis on reaching out to people and groups who are not fully part of the communities of South Jersey because they are poor and vulnerable. Through innovative, caring social services, and because of our high standards and expectations, we seek to provide an appropriate service to all who ask for our assistance. Our search for change and transformation leads us to create innovative partnerships with Catholic parishes and service organizations, other social service agencies, federal, state and local governments, and all people of good will. Our genuine concern for justice means that we will advocate for people and communities. As wise stewards of the resources we employ, funders, donors and volunteers can entrust to us their time, talents, and funds with confidence and faith. How does Catholic Charities fulfill its mission and vision? Pope Benedict describes our program as a heart which sees. We try to see what people need and develop services to help them. We offer a number of services that help us fulfill the promise of the Gospel and assist the poor and vulnerable in our community. • Migration and Refugee Services The Lord protects the stranger — Ps 146:9 War, famine, disease, and persecution cause millions to flee their countries. Perhaps having witnessed murders or abductions, they may walk for days or weeks, with the few possessions they can carry, in pursuit of food and shelter. They may remain in refugee camps for years awaiting resettlement in safer countries. Others may be victims of “human trafficking,” in which by force or coercion they are moved to wealthier countries for purposes of sexual exploitation or forced labor. Refugees arrive in South Jersey in need of both material assistance and assistance to assimilate into a vastly different culture. Catholic Charities shepherds refugees as they transition to their new homes, find employment and become part of the American fabric. • Faith in Families What profit has man from all the labor which he toils at under the sun? — Eccl 1:3 Those who have been unable to participate fully in society because they have needed public assistance, often struggle with the transition to employment. With the guidance of specialized case managers, many of these people, often young, single mothers, are able to move toward greater independence from social systems which have often contributed to the dependence they were designed to combat. • Family Services and Community Centers The poor you will always have with you — Mt 26:11 In New Jersey over 800,000 people per year suffer from food insecurity; over one third of them are children. One fifth of our state population is considered poor. Catholic Charities is able to provide food assistance, information and referral, and in some instances utility or rental assistance to assist the poor or those struggling financially. Case managers assist the poor to identify what they need in order to become self-sufficient. • Prison Ministry When I was imprisoned you came to visit me — Mt 25:36 Over the last 25 years the prison population in New Jersey has quadrupled. The imprisoned are usually poorly educated, economically deprived, young minority men, over one third of whom are diagnosed with a learning disability and/or a serious medical or mental health issue and who have been arrested for a drug offense. Most receive little or no academic or vocational training before they are released. Opportunities are made available to clergy and parishioners to provide spiritual support, hope, and direction to the imprisoned. • Crisis Pregnancy and Adoption You formed my inmost being... in my mother's womb — Ps 139:13 In New Jersey about 1 of every 3 pregnancies is “mistimed.” While many of these soon become a welcome surprise, for others an unplanned pregnancy can be a challenge. Young women who become pregnant are less likely to complete high school or to ever get married, and are more likely to live in poverty. These women, their partners, and families are provided with support and information as they make the best plans for their babies. • School Based Family Support Train a child in the way he should go, even when he is older he will not swerve from it— Prv 22:6 Many children have problems and concerns that make it difficult for them to succeed at school. Their parents’ divorce, the traumas of living in a dangerous neighborhood or being bullied by other children are but a few of their concerns. Family Support Specialists provide counseling, advocacy, and case management to children, their families, and their teachers to create a supportive environment in which all those who care about the children are working together to ensure the children can succeed. • Behavioral Health Services All who call upon me I will answer; I will be with them in distress — Ps 91:15 It is normal for people to experience challenging times throughout life. Anxiety, depression, eating disorders, self-injury, and phobias are among the many mental illnesses which affect millions of Americans each year. While this is normal it can be stressful and confusing. When a person’s typical coping mechanisms are no longer effective the assistance of our professional therapists can be helpful. Family focused, strength-based, and spiritually sensitive, our counseling services, presentations, and retreats offer the skills to help individuals, couples, and families begin to rely on their own abilities to address their concerns in healthy ways. • Veterans Services-Ready, Vet, Go “Lord, bid war’s trumpet to cease; fold the whole earth in peace.” — Oliver Wendell Holmes Long after the trumpet of war has sounded we know that there is a tremendous cost to individual service-men and women, and their families. From being dislocated from their jobs and families, to the stress of repeated deployments, many veterans struggle to regain their equilibrium and resume the patterns of their lives. This program, in partnership with the Veterans Administration, provides services to low-income veterans and their families to prevent them from becoming homeless. • Asset Building “He is like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season and whose leaf does not wither. Whatever he does prospers.” — Ps 1:3 Helping low-income families build assets is about creating opportunities that will empower them to move forward on the path toward self-sufficiency. Social services for lower-income families have historically focused on income supports--such as Temporary Aid for Needy Families--but income alone is not enough. Strategies that help families save and leverage their income to invest in productive assets are needed to move families forward. Catholic Charities provides a variety of programs to help poor people build financial assets including a matched-savings program, small business development services, women and minority-owned business support, job clubs, and financial literacy services. What is the Justice for ALL Awards Dinner? The Justice for ALL Awards Dinner is an annual fundraising event hosted by Catholic Charities to honor ordinary people who do extraordinary things in the name of social justice and a commitment to helping the least among us. Why host the Justice for ALL Awards Dinner? The Justice for ALL Awards Dinner was created to promote awareness of social justice issues in the Diocese of Camden and to promote Catholic Charities by identifying, cultivating and engaging individuals who are committed to our Mission. The event accomplishes this by selecting and honoring individuals and organizations who, by their actions, have demonstrated their commitment to social justice and the common good, and the needs of poor and vulnerable people. Who does the Justice for ALL Awards Dinner honor? The Justice for ALL Awards Dinner recognizes individuals and groups who have dedicated themselves in service to charity and justice, and who have contributed to a better world by doing good. Each year, awards are given in the areas of leadership, parish/community ministry, social ministry and social justice. The awards given each year are: The Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio Award for Leadership recognizes the leadership of the former Bishop of the Diocese in promoting the development of Diocesan social ministries for the poor and vulnerable. The Sister Grace Nolan Award for Social Ministry honors the enduring work of Sister Grace Nolan, R.S.M., who served the poor of Atlantic County for over forty years. The Peter J. O’Connor Award for Social Justice honors the founder and director of Fair Share Housing Center, and one of the original lawyers in New Jersey’s famous Mount Laurel doctrine-which outlawed exclusionary zoning practices and paved the way for reforms in affordable housing policy across the United States. The Monsignor Michael Doyle & Monsignor Robert McDermott Award for Parish and Community Ministry honors the pioneering efforts of the pastors of two exceptionally socially active parishes in the Diocese of Camden. This year we are happy to be able to honor the following individuals: Thomas A. Cavalieri, D.O., of Mullica Hill, recipient of The Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio Award for Leadership In every facet of his life, Thomas Cavalieri, D.O., has shown a strong commitment to his faith, his profession, his family and the people to whom he brings medical service. As a geriatric educator and clinician, he has been an advocate for older adults for more than 25 years, raising the standard of care for them and helping the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s School of Osteopathic Medicine (UMDNJ-SOM) to achieve national recognition in the field of geriatrics. Cavalieri currently serves as dean of UMDNJ-SOM, professor of medicine and endowed chair for Primary Care Research. He previously served as the director of the New Jersey Institute for Successful Aging (formerly the Center for Aging, where he was Founding Director) and chair of the Department of Medicine. Ann M. Budde of Bridgeton, recipient of The Sister Grace Nolan Award for Social Ministry Ann Budde is a woman of many firsts. She was the first woman to become vice president of a non-Catholic hospital in New Jersey, the first woman inducted into the Bridgeton Rotary, and the first woman president of the Cumberland County Board of Vocational Education. Budde is also an inductee in the Cumberland County Women’s Hall of Fame, has served as chair of the South Jersey Hospital Board, and has chaired numerous positions with United Way, March of Dimes, Research Club of Bridgeton and many other organizations. Currently, Budde serves as Director of the Good Sheppard Dining Room Soup Kitchen, which feeds more than 21,000 people in need in the Cumberland County community each year. Deacon William Johnson of Bridgeton, recipient of The Peter J. O’Connor Award for Social Justice Deacon William Johnson was the first African-American ordained as a deacon in the Diocese of Camden and served as deacon in his home parish of St. Teresa of Avila in Bridgeton. Deacon Johnson also served as an advocate and canonical consultant to the tribunal and chair of the former Black Catholic Ministry Board. He was appointed as the first director of the Office for Black Catholic Ministry and later served as chair of the former Racial Justice Committee. Under his leadership and guidance, the Racial Justice Committee embarked on racial justice training for the Diocese and led the efforts of others to become certified in order to continue to provide the training. Deacon Johnson has worked tirelessly to minister to the Black Catholic community in South Jersey. Joseph Balzano, posthumous recipient of The Msgr. Michael Doyle and Msgr. Robert McDermott Award for Parish and Community Ministry The late Joseph Balzano began his career at the Port of Camden in 1951 as an office clerk and equipment operator. In 1989, he was appointed as the South Jersey Port Corporation’s executive director and chief executive officer. For more than five decades, Balzano was a major force in the City of Camden, spearheading port expansion and economic development and fighting tirelessly for Camden’s less-fortunate residents. He was an active and dedicated member of Sacred Heart Church, remembered for his yearly Christmas tree and countless other generosities. During Balzano’s lifetime, he received countless awards and recognition for his legendary port operations expertise and his contributions to the community at large. Giovina Price is special events coordinator, Diocese of Camden, Office of Development.
Thursday, 29 March 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
A group of non-profit agencies including Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, launched a free tax preparation service for low-income families on Dec. 13, at Camden County College in Camden. The agencies sponsoring the project are part of The Camden Asset Network (CAN), which also include United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey and the Internal Revenue Service. Kevin Hickey, executive director of Catholic Charities, noted that proper tax preparation can help low-income families (with household incomes up to $51,000) keep more of their money through the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and other tax credits. "The EITC and other tax credits can provide up to a third of a family's annual income. Tax time is an opportunity to build assets, through options such as savings accounts and financial assistance for education," said Hickey. CAN provides free income tax preparation at its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites to help individuals and families with household incomes under $51,000 access their Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and other tax credits. CAN's community partners have come together to help people in Camden access free tax preparation and gain their full tax refund. At least 90 percent of Camden residents qualify for free tax preparation, yet IRS statistics show that less than 2 percent of qualified filers have their returns prepared at free VITA sites. Camden Asset Network's community partners also include Camden County College, Center for Family Services, Cramer Hill CDC, Hispanic Family Center, LAEDA, PathWays, and the Puerto Rican Unity for Progress.
Thursday, 20 December 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
"We serve a lot of immigrants," said Andy Zmuda, head of Catholic Charities of Camden's Small Business Development Program. "Word spreads quickly in ethnic communities about what we do." For seven years, this innovative program has been helping small businesses get off the ground, many of them immigrant-owned. Immigrants have skills, talents, and energy to contribute to a business, but lack the know-how and resources to start one. That's where the program comes in. "We work with clients one on one. The curriculum is their business plan," said Zmuda. "First, we work on validating their business idea. Will it work? What is the reality of the job market? Is the market saturated with this kind of business? We answer those questions and then let the client decide whether to move forward." Moving forward can be a daunting process, which is why the program gives such personalized attention to each client. "We go deep with them. We become coach, therapist and mentor. We ask them to do hard things," said Zmuda. "You have to have a relationship of trust to do that, and that relationship doesn't come in a classroom." Once a viable business plan is developed, the program helps the client access a microloan fund, so they can cover start-up costs. If necessary, the program works with the client to repair their credit. Over the years, the program has helped many immigrants start a variety of successful businesses-lawn care, security, drain cleaning, auto repair, dog grooming, janitorial work, and other businesses. Yamin, an immigrant from Burma, lived in the United States and worked in food service for several years. He learned a lot through his work, and with a head for business, he consulted with Zmuda about his plan to open a sushi franchise. Through the agency's IDA program, Yamin was able to save the money he needed to buy a franchise and attend the company's franchise training, and after that, with the program's help, he was able to secure a $15,000 loan to get the business going. It took hard work, but Yamin succeeded and today, he owns two sushi franchises and is supporting his family well. Zmuda has seen how owning a business can help immigrants get a foothold in life and build financial stability for their families. "Success is measured in many ways. It really depends on what people want to get out of it," he said. "But one of our main goals is to help families get off public assistance. Self-sufficiency is exponentially liberating. It's a better way of living life." First printed in Charities USA, Spring 2013. Reprinted with permission of Catholic Charities USA.
Thursday, 05 September 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ: The annual collection for the Catholic Communication Campaign (CCC) of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will be taken up in parishes of the Diocese of Camden on the weekend of May 17-18. This collection is used to support multimedia projects that promote Gospel values through network television specials, radio programs, and new media content. Half of the money collected is forwarded to the CCC while the remaining half helps fund local diocesan communications efforts. Locally,the diocese in the last year launched a completely redesigned website (www.camdendiocese.org), with more than 500 pages of content describing the range of ministries and parish support services provided by the diocese to help the Catholic people of South Jersey grow more deeply in the Catholic faith.
Thursday, 15 May 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
News/Latest News
Author:Bishop Joseph A. Galante
Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ:  For more than 25 years, the Catholic Communication Campaign (CCC) of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has been spreading the Gospel message locally and nationally on radio, television, in print and on the Internet. This year the Collection will be taken up in parishes of the Diocese of Camden on the weekend of May 16-17.    This collection is used to support multimedia projects that promote Gospel values through network television specials, radio programs, and new media content. Half of the money collected is forwarded to the CCC while the remaining half helps fund local diocesan communications efforts. • Internet: CCC provides blogs, live streaming videos, articles, audio and texts, such as during the Holy Father’s 2008 visit to the United States.  Also, daily Scripture readings are available for listening or download at www.usccb.org. • Movies: The USCCB Office of Film and Broadcasting reviews and evaluates the moral soundness of movies, DVDs, theater and video—providing valuable resources for families seeking faith-enhancing entertainment. • Radio: Lino at Large tackles real-world issues facing Catholic young adults on his weekly program, available on the Catholic Channel (159) on Sirius Satellite Radio and as a downloadable podcast at www.usccb.org. • Television: USCCB Video offers reflections on the daily Mass readings, a series on the sacraments and news reports on people living out the Gospel in their lives and communities, allowing viewers to experience various aspects of the Catholic faith.  • Special Campaigns:  The For Your Marriage campaign used public service announcements on radio, television and billboards throughout the country to draw people seeking information on the Sacrament of Marriage to its Web site: foryourmarriage.org. Given the importance of the communications media to the life and mission of the Church, I am grateful for your generous support of this important collection. Fraternally, Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante, D.D., J.C.D. Bishop of Camden  
Thursday, 14 May 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Rich Luongo
Photo by Craig Pittelli Father Victorino Coronado stands with members of Catholic Daughters of the Americas, Court Mater Creatoris 1808, for a photo following Mass Oct. 18 at Our Queen of Peace Parish, Williamstown. WILLIAMSTOWN — The Catholic Daughters of the Americas in Our Lady of Peace Parish celebrated its 50th anniversary on Oct. 18 with a special Mass and the recitation of the rosary. Although it’s actively involved in Our Lady of Peace Parish here, the organization also involves itself with surrounding parishes, according to Kathie Restuccio who heads the local chapter, whose official name is Court Mater Creatoris 1808. “Our mission is to promote the Catholic faith through charity work,” she said. “We get involved with the community through prayer and church-related functions.” The group’s motto is “Unity and Charity” and “to be helping hands where there is pain, poverty, sorrow, or sickness,” Restuccio said, noting that the “Unity and Charity,” together “share a distinctly feminine spirituality alluded to by Pope John Paul II when he spoke of the necessity of ‘feminine genius’ in the world today.” The local chapter or court is part of one of the oldest and largest Catholic organizations in the Americas and, over the years, has gotten involved in the National Life Center baby shower, adopting seminarians, contributing to “Morality in Media,” public rosaries, and has donated more than 4,000 baptismal bibs, among other projects. The local court contributes to such projects of the national court as Covenant House and Catholic Relief Services. Restuccio said all Catholic women 18 and older “are encouraged to become a Catholic Daughter. The daughters pray often, work hard, have fun, and are united in charity.” Except for July and August, meetings are held on the third Monday of the month at the Knights of Columbus hall in Williamstown. Meetings begin at 6:30 p.m. with the recitation of the rosary. For more information call Restuccio at 856-629-8547.
Thursday, 29 October 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
The Catholic Daughters of the  Americas Court 2262 Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha of Our Lady of the Lakes Church in Collings Lakes are shown with their pastor Father John Cavagnaro last month after a Mass in honor of their patron who was canonized a saint on the same day, Oct. 21. They also remembered their deceased members at the Mass.
Thursday, 29 November 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
The third Annual Catholic DeaFest will be held March 9 in Princeton Junction, N.J., and feature Father Shawn Carey from the Archdiocese of Boston. One of 11 deaf priests in the United States, Father Carey celebrates Mass in American Sign Language. He will lead a Deaf Young Adults and Teens group to Rio de Janiero, Brazil, this summer for World Youth Day. Father Carey has served as director of the Deaf Apostolate for the Archdiocese of Boston since June 5, 2012, and previously served as parochial vicar at a hearing parish that successfully integrated the Deaf Catholic Community into parish life. Prior to his seminary studies, he worked as a mutual fund investment analyst with Putnam Investments of Boston, completed a Paralegal Certification from Northeastern University and graduated with a bachelor's degree in Political Science and Business Studies from Providence College, Providence, R.I. Other presenters at Catholic Deafest will be Annmarie Buraczeski, a member of Deaf & Hard of Hearing Community Emergency Preparedness Coordinator Certified Community Emergency Response Team, and Peter Noyes, a well-known leader in the Washington, D.C., area who ran the International Catholic Deaf Association Home Office in Landover Hills, Md. until December, 2012. Catholic DeaFest Celebration on March 9 begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m. after Mass Free admission. Light breakfast and lunch will be served. There will be voice interpreters and CART available for all. The building is fully accessible.
Thursday, 14 February 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Five parishes — St. Joseph’s Parish in Somers Point, St. Andrew the Apostle in Gibbsboro, St. Rose of Lima in Haddon Heights, Our Lady of Peace in Williamstown and Holy Family in Sewell — will open their doors this month to those who are struggling with the loss of a relationship due to separation or divorce. “While as a church we must try to ensure the sanctity of the marriage bond, we cannot forget the significant portion of our parishioners who have already experienced the trauma, pain and suffering that come from the fracturing of both relationships and families,” said Deacon Tom Jennings, who coordinates the Catholic Divorce Ministry in the Diocese of Camden with his wife, Carol. Each parish will host a support group that is facilitated by trained group leaders who establish guidelines of confidentiality and respect. “Ministry facilitators are not counselors,” explained Carol Jennings, “therefore no advice is given. The programs offer a forum to share stories. Participants are encouraged to commit to working through the grief that comes from a divorce. Often there is a desire to start dating before the healing process has established a sense of recovery. This behavior can actually cause more harm and add additional time to the recovery process.” DivorceCare consists of 13 sessions during which peers can share insights gained from their own experiences and from DVDs. Reflective questions and exercises are provided for every session to promote group participation. The meeting format is designed to keep the discussions meaningful, yet open enough to allow a free exchange of ideas and experiences. This recovery program is produced by Church Initiative, Inc. and there is a component in it for reconciliation. “Participants come to DivorceCare,” said Debbie Wolk co-facilitator at Our Lady of Peace, “seeking help for what seems like a hopeless situation. After 13 weeks they often ask what is next. They have a taste of the healing that God provides through the work of others that have experienced similar pain.” Divorce and Beyond is a 10-week program written by Brother James Greteman, C.S.C. and Leon Haverkamp. It focuses on the transition – or mourning — period of the divorce process. Participants engage with a text rich in reflective activities and rituals. “Small groups offer divorced people the best opportunity for dealing with values, feelings and issues surrounding divorce,” said Ann Buongiovanni, co-facilitator at St. Rose of Lima Parish. “People need a ‘safe place’ where they can again experience the love of their community and gain the strength necessary to rebuild their lives.” Each program provides an information session on the annulment process. Most facilitators are trained to help with the filing process. “One of the most moving experiences for me as a facilitator,” says Therese McCloskey, “is the closing healing rituals where participants and facilitators experience an ‘unbinding’ from the pain. They start to understand the transformation that is possible through trust in God.” The following programs will be starting this September: DivorceCare — Wednesday, Sept. 9, 7-9 p.m., Our Lady of Peace, (formerly St. Mary) Parish, Williamstown. Register by calling Debbie at 856-881-4133. — Thursday, Sept. 10, 7:30-9:30 p.m., St. Joseph Parish, Somers Point. Register by calling Carol or Deacon Tom at 856-663-8166. — Monday, Sept. 14, 7:30-9:30 p.m., St. Andrew the Apostle Parish, Gibbsboro. Register by calling Sister Alma at 856-784-8501. Child care is available. Divorce and Beyond — Wednesday, Sept. 9, 7:30-9 p.m., St. Rose of Lima Parish, Haddon Heights. Call Ann to register at 856, 869-0076. — Tuesday, Sept. 15, 7:45-9:30 p.m., Holy Family Parish, Sewell. Call Sister Eucharista to register at 856-869-0840. There is a $20 registration fee per program for the workbooks used. The Jennings’ goal is to establish and train a pastoral group that will facilitate a support program in each county of the Diocese of Camden. There is currently a need in Cape May, Cumberland and Salem counties for support groups. For information on any of these programs or to register, e-mail cdmofcamdencounty@yahoo.com, or go to the CDM website at www.nacsdc.org
Thursday, 03 September 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
The New Jersey Catholic Conference and the New Jersey Network of Catholic School Families are trying to build support for legislation that is currently in the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee for a vote. The Urban Enterprise Zone Jobs Scholarship Act (S1607/A2897) is a corporate tax credit bill (not a voucher) which is modeled after a similar bill that has been operating for many years in Pennsylvania. The legislation would offer the opportunity for scholarships for low-income students living in the districts contained in the bill in order for them to attend a participating nonpublic school in their area. Up to 25 percent of the scholarship funds may be utilized for current nonpublic school students to remain in their nonpublic school of choice. Catholic school advocates are encouraging Catholics to contact members of the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee to urge them to vote favorably on the bill and release it for a full Senate vote. More information can be found at http://capwiz.com/njsca/home/
Thursday, 26 February 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Admin2
In May and June, a total of 1,306 students graduated from Catholic high schools in the Diocese of Camden, with over $112 million in scholarships and grants awarded to students. A total of 1,290 of the graduates (99 percent) will attend college in the fall. Some others will go on to serve in the U.S. military. The schools boasted several National Merit Award recipients including two National Merit Finalists and 10 National Merit Scholarship Commended students, as well as many other scholarship awards and special recognitions. One thousand and sixty-two graduates came from high schools connected to the diocese: Gloucester Catholic (Gloucester), St. Joseph (Hammonton), Sacred Heart (Vineland), Wildwood Catholic (Wildwood), Camden Catholic (Cherry Hill), Paul VI (Haddon Township) and Holy Spirit (Absecon). Also, 244 graduates were enrolled in two private Catholic schools: Bishop Eustace Preparatory School (Pennsauken) and Our Lady of Mercy Academy (Newfield). Data from St. Augustine Preparatory School, a private Catholic high school in Richland, is not included in these figures.
Monday, 25 June 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Sports/Sports News
Eighty-two South Jersey high school football players were selected to play in this year’s Adam Taliaferro Foundation All-Star Football Classic, held at Rowan University, Glassboro on June 26. The event is named after Adam Taliaferro, a former football star for Eastern High School who overcame a spinal injury that almost paralyzed him while he was a freshman at Penn State University.  The White team, consisting of players from Camden, Gloucester and Salem counties, defeated the Blue Team, made up of players from Atlantic, Burlington, Cape May and Cumberland counties, by a final score of 30-18. Nine players from Catholic schools in the Camden Diocese suited up for the game. They included, for the White squad, Ed Kispert and Nick Ciocco, both from Gloucester Catholic; Tyler Hagan and Bill Burkett, Paul VI, Haddon Township; Ryan Piatek and Tom Dixon, Bishop Eustace, Pennsauken; and Courtney Kimp, Camden Catholic, Cherry Hill .For the Blue squad, Chris Wilhelm and Keith Corcoran, both from St. Joseph, Hammonton; and Nick Hall and Pat Schell, Holy Spirit, Absecon, were selected.
Thursday, 17 July 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
High school teachers from four South Jersey Catholic high schools who are represented by the Catholic Teachers Union (CTU) have ratified a new four year contract ending an impasse over salaries and benefits and bringing a four day strike to a close. Paul VI (Haddon Twp.), Holy Spirit (Absecon) and Camden Catholic (Cherry Hill) high school teachers ratified the contract Oct. 23 by a vote of 131 to 5.  Sacred Heart (Vineland) teachers approved the contract October 26 by a 19-1 vote. A six hour negotiation session on Oct. 22 yielded a tentative agreement and ended the strike by teachers from Paul VI, Holy Spirit and Camden Catholic. Teachers returned to classrooms Oct. 26. The three schools operated on a modified schedule during the strike period with freshmen and sophomores alternating days with juniors and seniors. Administrators, staff, substitute and non-union teachers and union members who crossed the picket line provided supervision and instruction in the interim. Two of the days lost to the strike will be made up by the end of the school year. The four year contract, which is effective retroactively to September 1, 2009, provides salary increases averaging about three percent per year, with a comprehensive benefits package for all teachers. “The agreement is a strong one that is fair to teachers who are deserving of a just wage and to families who support school costs through tuition,” said Andrew Walton, spokesman for the diocese. “Negotiators are to be commended for balancing the concerns of all parties and working amicably and in good faith toward a mutually beneficial agreement that can be supported wholeheartedly by all,” said Walton. Union president Bill Blumenstein said on the CTU website, “The union, on behalf of the teachers, thanks all parents and others who expressed their support for the teachers.” The terms of the new contract include: — Years 1 and 2:  A 2.6 percent salary increase each in years one and two ($1,140 per year), with fully paid health benefits for all teachers and their dependents. —  Years 3 and 4:  A 3.5 percent salary increase each in years three and four, with a 5 percent share in the cost of the medical coverage premium through payroll deduction for all teachers and dependents. An extension of the contract from the initially proposed two years to four years appeared to provide the opening for negotiators to reach agreement.   The schools had proposed a two year contract with salary increases averaging about 5.25 percent over the term of the contract, or $1,140 per teacher per year on the average teacher salary of $43,500. Union officials were seeking the $1,140 per year, plus additional increases of 1.5 percent in year one and 1.75 percent in year two. The schools also were proposing that teachers hired on or after September 1, 2009 pay 5 percent of the premium cost of the medical portion of their benefits through payroll deduction. This has been deferred to years three and four, at which time all teachers will contribute toward the cost of medical benefits.
Thursday, 29 October 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Letters to the Editor/Latest Letters to the Editor
Author:Rev. Charles J. Colozzi
I appreciate your recent focus on Catholic higher education, and your listing of local schools, enabling those looking to better see what their options are. I’m especially happy when our own Newman programs are promoted, as we have some outstanding clergy and lay people who work locally with our young people on and off campus. I just wanted to voice a concern, both of mine and of parents sending their children to schools with Catholic names, in an effort to raise awareness for those considering some of these colleges. It is often found that those who run these schools are actually permitting and encouraging beliefs and practices contrary to our faith. For example, as I write you this letter, I have just received a call from a former student who is quite upset, due to the fact that as she attended Sunday evening Mass at her local Catholic college they were inaugurating gay pride week. At the Mass, the priest openly spoke against Pope Benedict as part of his homily, and clearly told the students to be disobedient. I receive these kinds of calls on a regular basis, and families never cease to be dismayed as they realize they’ve spent endless amounts of money for a Catholic education that wasn’t really Catholic. One website I encourage people to investigate to get a gauge on the situation is that of the National Catholic Register, in which a yearly guide is published using objective criteria to assess certain schools’ adherence to the church’s teachings. I recommend that students and parents research carefully before they choose a school on the basis of Catholic identity. Rev. Charles J. Colozzi Pennsauken
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/School Briefs
Catholic Holy Family Society has announced the latest winners from the Joseph J. and Jean Konrad Catholic High School Scholarship Program.  Katherine Lang, aresident of HI-Nella and student at Paul VI High School, Haddon Townshop, has been awarded one of five tuition grants given by the Society. Katherine’s grandmother and Society member Helen M. Valvardi, a resident of Glendora, nominated her. Twice a year, this program awards five Catholic high school students, nominated by members of the Society, with a tuition grant. James Rial, the Society’s President said, “Our organization is pleased to support Catholic education by assisting high school students with their tuition.”   Catholic Holy Family Society was founded in 1915 as an Illinois fraternal benefit organization providing life insurance to Catholics. The Society currently transacts business in eighteen states with its offices located in Joliet and Belleville, Illinois.  Through service to its members and programs designed to aid the entire Catholic community, the Society has created an organization in which its members join together for their mutual protection and benefit. For more information call 800-435-0089 or visit our websiteat www.chfsociety.org
Friday, 22 February 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Catholic Holy Family Society has announced the latest winners from the Joseph J. and Jean Konrad Catholic High School Scholarship Program. Katherine Lang, a resident of HI-Nella and student at Paul VI High School, Haddon Townshop, has been awarded one of five tuition grants given by the Society. Katherine’s grandmother and Society member Helen M. Valvardi, a resident of Glendora, nominated her. Twice a year, this program awards five Catholic high school students, nominated by members of the Society, with a tuition grant. James Rial, the Society’s President said, “Our organization is pleased to support Catholic education by assisting high school students with their tuition.”   Catholic Holy Family Society was founded in 1915 as an Illinois fraternal benefit organization providing life insurance to Catholics.The Society currently transacts business in eighteen states with its offices located in Joliet and Belleville, Illinois.  Through service to its members and programs designed to aid the entire Catholic community, the Society has created an organization in which its members join together for their mutual protection and benefit. For more information call 800-435-0089 or visit our websiteat www.chfsociety.org
Thursday, 21 February 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Carmela Malerba
The second Annual Education Summit, sponsored by Catholic Partnership Schools, will take place on Monday, March 24 at the Enterprise Center at Burlington County College in Mount Laurel. With the theme of "Self-Control, Poverty, Social and Emotional Development and the Roles They Play in Raising Our Children," academics, educators, school psychologists, social workers, early education specialists and others will gather together for a daylong exploration of the long-term psychological and neurological impact of poverty and trauma on children's ability to learn. Angela Duckworth from the University of Pennsylvania, will give the keynote address. A 2013 recipient of the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, she is known throughout the country for advancing the understanding of how self-control and grit impact success. Panelists for the day include Maurice J. Elias, Rutgers University, New Brunswick; Hallam Hurt, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Douglas MacIver, Johns Hopkins University; and Matt Katz, moderator, WNYC, New York Public Radio. Along with the keynote address and panel, there will be facilitated workshops, a question and answer period, and lunch. Catholic Partnership Schools, the sponsor for the conference, helps educate and manage more than 1,000 children in five K-8 schools in Camden. For more information, and to register, visit http://www.catholicpartnershipschools.org/summit/, or contact Sister Karen Dietrich, SSJ, PhD, executive director, 856-338-0966, kdietrich@cspschools.org; or Keith A. Lampman, Director of Development, 856-338-0966, kalampman@cspschools.org.
Thursday, 13 March 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Recording artist Andy Cooney spoke to business professionals last week about his Catholic faith, his family, and the importance of service to others, at the Catholic Business Network of Southern New Jersey's monthly breakfast, at Woodcrest Country Club in Cherry Hill. Forty business professionals came together on Friday, Jan. 10 to network and share their faith and experiences. At the monthly gatherings, individuals get "a good message, good speaker, and meet great people," observed Thomas Iacovone, vice president of Art Guild, Inc., a full-service trade show and event company for corporations. A parishioner and trustee of the Catholic Community of the Holy Spirit in Mullica Hill, Iacavone also serves as director of the School Advisory Board for Gloucester Catholic High School. "I can form a common bond, with like-minded individuals," he said. Gary Zimak, Cinnaminson resident, author, radio host and Catholic evangelist, spoke at the first breakfast, held last fall. Since then, he has come to hear all of the speakers and to meet others. "I'm very impressed with this group of people I interact with, who live out their faith not just on Sunday, but through their businesses, and everyday practices. They're authentically Catholic," he said. The breakfast was not just a place for faithful businessmen and women currently in the workplace, but for those looking for work, such as Kimberly Muldoon, a recent transplant to the Philadelphia area from New York. "This monthly meet-up is a great networking tool," she said. The next breakfast will be held on Friday, Feb. 14 at the Woodcrest Country Club, with Father Stephen Rapposelli. For more information, contact Sheila McGirl at sjcbn@comcast.net
Thursday, 16 January 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ:  The Catholic Relief Services Collection will be taken up in parishes of the diocese March 21-22. The official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic Church in the United States, CRS alleviates suffering and provides assistance to people in need in more than 100 countries, without regard to race, religion or nationality, including:  Emergency Relief: In areas devastated by natural disasters and wars, CRS is often among the first on the ground providing water, food, shelter, protection from abuses and other basic needs, while working for peaceful resolution of conflicts.  Hunger: With millions worldwide unable to meet their most basic, daily needs, CRS works to alleviate chronic hunger, to develop agriculture, improve water and sanitation, sustainable work options, microfinance to support small businesses, and a safety net for those who have no other means of support. Education: Given that lasting improvement in the lives of the poor cannot be achieved without education, access to education for all, as well as improved quality of education, are key components of CRS’ work around the world.  Health: In much of the developing world, people have little access to health care — no clinics, no hospitals, no doctors, no medicine.  Focusing on remote and underserved areas, CRS establishes community-based health care systems that give people the tools they need to manage their own health needs.  Helping at Home: While CRS serves the poor and vulnerable overseas, it also works to help educate American Catholics to put their faith into action, encouraging them to advocate for changes that uproot the unjust structures that constrain the lives of the poor and perpetuate poverty, conflict and inequality.  Given the great needs here at home and around the world, I ask you to give generously to the Catholic Relief Services Collection and to pray for all those who are served by the appeal.                                                              Fraternally,                                                             Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante, D.D., J.C.D.                                                             Bishop of Camden
Thursday, 12 March 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Bishop Joseph A. Galante
Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ: The Catholic Relief Services Collection will be taken up in parishes of the Diocese of Camden during the weekend of March 13-14. The official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic Church in the United States, CRS alleviates suffering and provides assistance to people in need in more than 100 countries, without regard to race, religion or nationality. In areas devastated by natural disasters and wars, CRS is often among the first on the ground providing water, food, shelter, protection from abuses and other basic needs, while working for peaceful resolution of conflicts. CRS, for example, has provided food to more than 500,000 men, women and children displaced by the recent earthquake in Haiti. CRS distributed emergency shelter kits — waterproof sheeting, lumber and nails — to more than 40,000 Haitians who have been living under sheets and other materials that will be useless with the coming rainy season. CRS has also set up teams of doctors, nurses and practitioners to run nine health sites across the capital city, some in informal camps, others in clinics. Meanwhile, CRS workers in Haiti are working on sanitation concerns, improving access to clean water, and providing sound hygiene education to schools and health centers. In addition to responding to major emergencies, CRS around the globe works to fight hunger, disease and poverty, improve education and health care, and to nurture peaceful and just societies. Given the great needs here at home and around the world, I ask you to give generously to the Catholic Relief Services Collection and to pray for all those who are served by the appeal. Fraternally, Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante, D.D., J.C.D. Bishop of Camden
Thursday, 04 March 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
A Catholic revival will be held Aug. 12 at the Parish of the Holy Cross. The event is free. The monthly Catholic Revival is planned for every second Friday of the month from 7-9 p.m. with registration beginning at 6:30 p.m. The revival will be at the Parish of The Holy Cross (St Teresa of Avila Church) 46 Central Ave. Bridgeton. For more information, contact Deacon Arnaldo Santos at 856-455-2323.
Thursday, 04 August 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Admin2
In May and June, a total of 1,299 students graduated from Catholic secondary schools in the Diocese of Camden, with more than $139 million in scholarships and grants awarded to students. A total of 1,242 of the graduates (96 percent) will attend college in the fall. Some others will go on to serve in the U.S. military. The schools boasted 14 National Merit Scholarship Commended students, as well as many other scholarship awards and special recognitions including seven U.S. military academy appointments. A total of 914 graduates came from diocesan high schools: Gloucester Catholic (Gloucester), St. Joseph (Hammonton), Sacred Heart (Vineland), Wildwood Catholic (Wildwood), Camden Catholic (Cherry Hill), Paul VI (Haddon Township) and Holy Spirit (Absecon). Also, 385 graduates were enrolled in three private Catholic schools: Bishop Eustace Preparatory School (Pennsauken) and Our Lady of Mercy Academy (Newfield), and St. Augustine Preparatory School (Richland).
Friday, 21 June 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report


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