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News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
PHILADELPHIA (CNS) — Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua, retired archbishop of Philadelphia, died Jan. 31 at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, where he resided. According to the Philadelphia Archdiocese, he died in his sleep at 9:15 p.m. He was 88. Cardinal Bevilacqua headed the archdiocese from February 1988 to October 2003. Funeral arrangements were pending. Pope Benedict XVI mourned the death of the cardinal, expressing his “heartfelt condolences” in a telegram sent to Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput. The pope praised the late cardinal’s “long-standing commitment to social justice and the pastoral care of immigrants, and his expert contribution to the revision of the church’s law in the years following the Second Vatican Council.” His death leaves the College of Cardinals with 191 members, 107 of whom are under the age of 80 and, therefore, eligible to vote in a conclave. Just a day before his death a Philadelphia judge ruled that Cardinal Bevilacqua, who suffered from dementia, was competent and could be become a witness in the upcoming trial of a Philadelphia priest, Msgr. William J. Lynn. The priest is accused of having failed to protect children from two priests who were under his direction when he served as secretary of the clergy. In 1990 Cardinal Bevilacqua joined Camden Bishop James T. McHugh in a dispute with the Philadelphia Inquirer. In a joint press conference held in Philadelphia, the two prelates took issue with an Inquirer editorial and editorial cartoon following Bishop McHugh’s decision that public figures who favor abortion rights should receive no recognition from Catholic organizations. Cardinal Bevilacqua asked the Inquirer, and received, equal space and prominence in the paper for a statement on the issues of religious tolerance and freedom, written by him and Bishop McHugh. But Msgr. Lynn’s defense lawyers said the cardinal could no longer recognize the priest who had been his longtime aide. In February 2011, Cardinal Bevilacqua and other archdiocesan officials were named in a civil lawsuit filed anonymously by a 28-year-old man. The man claimed he had been abused and named his alleged abusers in the suit as well as the cardinal and others he said failed to prevent the abuse. They included Cardinal Justin Rigali, who is now retired but succeeded Cardinal Bevilacqua as head of the Philadelphia Archdiocese. The civil suit was filed four days after the Philadelphia district attorney released a new report by a grand jury investigating clergy sex abuse in the archdiocese. In response to the report, which brought criminal indictments and followed a 2005 report, Cardinal Rigali, calling sex abuse of children a crime and “always wrong and always evil,” outlined new actions to respond to abuse allegations. Anthony Joseph Bevilacqua was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., June 17, 1923, and ordained a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn June 11, 1949, after studies at Immaculate Conception Seminary in Huntington, N.Y. He had a master’s degree in political science from Columbia University in New York, a doctorate in canon law from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome and a doctorate in civil law from St. John’s University in Jamaica, N.Y. Admitted to the New York and Pennsylvania bars and to the bar of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1988, he may have been the only cardinal in U.S. history accredited to argue cases before that body. He was diocesan chancellor and founding director of the Brooklyn Migration and Refugee Office when he was named an auxiliary bishop of Brooklyn in 1980. He was ordained a bishop Nov. 24 of that year. Three years later, he was named bishop of Pittsburgh and installed Dec. 12, 1983. Earlier that year, he was the Vatican-appointed delegate to resolve a dispute between Mercy Sister Agnes Mary Mansour and then-Archbishop Edmund C. Szoka of Detroit. The dispute arose over the nun’s position as state director of social services in Michigan, a post that involved funding abortions. When then-Bishop Bevilacqua told her she had to leave her job or her order if she would not publicly oppose state-funded abortions, she resigned from the Mercy Sisters. In the early 1980s, as chairman of the Committee on Canonical Affairs, he led the U.S. bishops through the first phases of implementing the new 1983 Code of Canon Law and making appropriate U.S. adaptations. As head of the Committee on Migration, he pushed for quick government action in 1983 to accommodate the needs of tens of thousands of Cambodian refugees. He regularly fought for more generous laws and policies to deal with undocumented immigrants. In Pittsburgh, he caused a national stir in 1986 when he said women could not be included in the Holy Thursday ritual washing of feet in parishes. A top Vatican official said his decision was in accord with the church rubric, which refers only to men, but at Bishop Bevilacqua’s request the U.S. bishops’ liturgy committee studied the issue and said a “variation” that included women in the ritual, in wide use around the country, was also legitimate. Bishop Bevilacqua then sent the committee’s memo to all his pastors, asking them to use their own judgment on the matter. He was a papally appointed member of the 1987 world Synod of Bishops, on the role of laity in the church and world. In Philadelphia, one of his first major decisions was to launch a capital campaign to create an education fund that would offset yearly deficits in the archdiocese’s extensive Catholic school system. He served many years on the bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities and spoke out often to condemn abortion and defend unborn life. He was elected chairman of the committee in 2001. He made spiritual renewal of the people a top priority and regularly visited parishes, schools, hospitals, prisons and other institutions in the archdiocese. He hosted a weekly radio call-in program, “Live With Cardinal Bevilacqua,” which aired on WZZD-AM from 1995 to 2000. He was a former member of the Vatican Congregation for Saints’ Causes, the Congregation for Clergy, the Pontifical Council Cor Unum, the Pontifical Council for Migrants and Travelers and the commission of cardinals that oversees the Vatican bank. He also was a former chairman of the Papal Foundation, a U.S. foundation dedicated to providing financial assistance to the Holy See.
Thursday, 02 February 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
By Mark Pattison Catholic News Service  WASHINGTON — Cardinal Avery Dulles, a Jesuit theologian who was made a cardinal in 2001, died Dec. 12 at the Jesuit infirmary in New York, Murray-Weigel Hall. A cause of death was not released but he had been in poor health. He was 90 years old. Cardinal Dulles had been the oldest living U.S. cardinal. His death was announced by the New York-based Jesuit provincial’s office. An evening wake was scheduled for Dec. 16 and 17 at Fordham University Church, followed by the celebration of Mass each evening. A funeral Mass for the cardinal was scheduled for Dec. 18 at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, followed by burial at the Jesuit Cemetery in Auriesville, N.Y. His death “brings home to God a great theologian and a totally dedicated servant of the church,” said Cardinal Francis E. George of Chicago, president of the U.S. bishops. “I am deeply saddened at the loss of a personal friend, but I rejoice in the hope that now he sees clearly what he explored so well in his studies on revelation, on grace and on the nature of the church and the papal office,” he said in a statement. Cardinal Dulles gave what was described as a farewell address in April, delivering the Laurence J. McGinley lecture at Jesuit-run Fordham University. In the presentation Cardinal Dulles reconfirmed his faith, his orthodoxy, his spirituality and his commitment to the Society of Jesus. He also offered a final word against the materialism, relativism, subjectivism, hedonism, scientism and superficial anti-intellectualism he said is found in modern society. Later that month he had a private meeting with Pope Benedict XVI during the pontiff’s visit to New York. “It was a lovely meeting,” said Dominican Sister Anne-Marie Kirmse, the cardinal’s executive assistant for the past 20 years. “The pope literally bounded into the room with a big smile on his face,” she told Catholic News Service. The session was called a significant meeting of “two of the leading Catholic theologians who interpreted Vatican II for a generation,” by Father James Massa, executive director of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Secretariat of Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. Father Massa said Dec. 12 that Cardinal Dulles was a “reliable and faithful interpreter” of the Second Vatican Council for “a generation of priests, scholars and faithful.” Pope John Paul II, who began the practice of naming as cardinals priest-theologians who were already past age 80 and therefore ineligible to vote in a conclave, included Cardinal Dulles in the group of cardinals created in 2001. Cardinal Dulles, the son of former Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and nephew of onetime CIA director Allen Walsh Dulles, both of whom served in the Eisenhower administration, became known in his own right for his groundbreaking 1974 work “Models of the Church” — one of 22 books published under his name — in which he defined the church as institution, mystical communion, sacrament, herald, servant and community of disciples, and critiqued each. Born Aug. 24, 1918, Cardinal Dulles was the grandson of a Presbyterian minister. He joined the Catholic Church as a young man after he went through a period of unbelief. “In becoming a Catholic, I felt from the beginning that I was joining the communion of the saints,” he said at a 2004 lecture in New York on author C.S. Lewis. “I found great joy at the sense of belonging to a body of believers that stretched across the face of the globe.” He entered the Catholic Church in 1941 while a student at Harvard Law School. He served in the Navy in World War II, then entered the Jesuits after his discharge in 1946. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1956. Cardinal Dulles had been the Laurence J. McGinley professor of religion and society at Fordham since 1988. He also had taught in Washington at the former Woodstock College, now folded into Georgetown University, in 1960-74, and The Catholic University of America, 1974-88. He had also been a visiting professor at Catholic, Protestant and secular colleges and universities. Past president of both the Catholic Theological Society of America and the American Theological Society, Cardinal Dulles served on the International Theological Commission and as a member of the U.S. Lutheran-Roman Catholic dialogue. He also served as a consultant to the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Doctrine.
Thursday, 18 December 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Carmela Malerba
Father James Bartoloma, a priest of the Camden Diocese who studies canon law and ecclesiastical Latin at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, is pictured with Cardinal Raymond Burke at the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican. Cardinal Burke, prefect of the Vatican’s supreme court, was one of two new American cardinals created by Pope Benedict XVI at the consistory on Nov. 20.
Wednesday, 24 November 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
DARBY, Pa. (CNS) — U.S. Cardinal John P. Foley, who spent more than two decades leading the church’s social communications council and later worked for the church in the Middle East, died Dec. 11 after a battle with leukemia. The cardinal, who had been residing at Villa St. Joseph, the home for retired Philadelphia archdiocesan priests, was 76. Cardinal Foley’s media-friendly style and quick sense of humor shone in person and throughout the numerous speeches and homilies he delivered around the world. He often spoke of the joys of working for the church, telling his audiences that while the pay often is not great “the benefits are out of this world.” Last February he retired from his post as grand master of the Knights of the Holy Sepulcher, a chivalric organization dedicated to supporting the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem and to responding to the needs of Catholics in the Holy Land. Addressing the 2010 Synod of Bishops on the Middle East, he said he was convinced that “the continued tension between the Israelis and the Palestinians has contributed greatly to the turmoil in all of the Middle East and also to the growth of Islamic fundamentalism.” While many, including the Holy See, have suggested a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian crisis, the more time passes, the more difficult such a solution becomes, as the building of Israeli settlements and Israeli-controlled infrastructure in East Jerusalem and in other parts of the West Bank make increasingly difficult the development of a viable and integral Palestinian state,” the cardinal said. He told participants in a U.S.-based conference on the Holy Land in 2009, “The most tragic thing I have seen is the miles-long wall that separates Jerusalem from Bethlehem and separates families and keeps farmers from the land that has been in their families for generations. It is humiliating and distressing.” The cardinal said he understood Israel’s need for security but added, “many of these measures raise serious human rights issues that they refuse to acknowledge and address.” To many, the cardinal was the voice they heard giving commentary during the pope’s Christmas midnight Mass. For 25 years, beginning in 1984, his voice was heard not only in North America, but also Asia, Africa, Europe and, for many years, Australia. The longtime journalist told Catholic News Service in 2007 that he always tried to take “a positive approach toward the means of communication and toward the people who run them.” For decades he helped media gain access to cover or rebroadcast Vatican events. As head of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications from 1984 to 2007, the cardinal took the lead in articulating Catholic policy with regard to the media. Under his leadership, the council issued separate documents on ethical standards in advertising, communications and the Internet. It also produced a document denouncing pornography. He helped launch the first Catholic program bank for Catholic broadcasters and encouraged efforts to narrow the “digital divide” separating countries where there is widespread access to the Internet and where there is almost none either because of poverty or government efforts to restrict citizens’ access to information. His time at the council coincided with the unfolding of the clergy sex abuse scandal — first in North America, then in other parts of the world. He said the sexual abuse of children by priests was only “the tip of an iceberg” of the wider scope of abuse perpetrated against the world’s children. Born in the Philadelphia suburb of Darby on Nov. 11, 1935, he was ordained a priest in Philadelphia when he was 26. The graduate of the School of Journalism at Columbia University in New York said his media experience dated back to the seventh grade, when he started writing radio plays on the lives of saints. Not only were his plays aired but, at age 14, he was asked to be an announcer for Sunday morning programming for what was then WJMJ in Philadelphia. Cardinal Foley has received numerous honorary degrees and awards.
Monday, 19 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Cardinal Chibly Langlois, named the first Haitian cardinal of the Catholic Church earlier this year, celebrated Mass July 20 at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish, Galloway, to mark the 14th anniversary of the Haitian community at St. Monica in Atlantic City. During his time in South Jersey, Cardinal Langlois of Les Cayes also visited relatives, presided at a cousin's wedding, and baptized two of his cousins' children. Photos from left: the cardinal, with Bishop Dennis Sullivan (at right), and Vicar General Father Robert Hughes (at left), and priests of the Diocese of Camden, celebrates the 2:30 p.m. Mass; Cardinal Langlois brings the Eucharist to a congregant and censes the altar. 0 0 1 10 57 Diocese of Camden 1 1 66 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable Photos by Alan M. Dumoff, more photos ccdphotolibrary.smugmug.com  
Thursday, 24 July 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Sports/Sports News
PHILADELPHIA (CNS) — After the Yankees won the 27th World Series Nov. 4, Cardinal Justin Rigali of Philadelphia made good on a wager with Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan of New York. The Yankees bested the Phillies four games to two to become the 2009 champions. Following the terms of the bet, Cardinal Rigali sent a box of Tastykakes to the Big Apple to congratulate his longtime friend on the Yankees win. Had the Phillies won, Archbishop Dolan was to ship a dozen bagels to the City of Brotherly Love. The cardinal, in a congratulatory note to Archbishop Dolan, said he had “planned to enjoy your New York bagels with Philadelphia Cream Cheese after another Phillies world championship.” With the Yankee win, he said, the “loss of our wager stings a little less” knowing how much the archbishop would enjoy the “taste of Philadelphia.” Cardinal Rigali also mentioned a possible rematch next year, citing the “talented nucleus” returning to the Phillies for the next season. The cardinal and the archbishop made the wager Oct. 27. “Cardinal Rigali is one of my closest and dearest friends; for several years he even served as my archbishop so I feel a particular loyalty to him. I know he has exquisite taste in most matters. I just wish he had better taste in baseball teams,” Archbishop Dolan said in a statement when they made the friendly bet. Archbishop Dolan was ordained a priest of the St. Louis Archdiocese in 1976, and from 1994 to 2003 then-Archbishop Rigali was head of the archdiocese. The New York archbishop also was an auxiliary bishop in St. Louis, 2001-02.
Thursday, 12 November 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Admin2
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Cardinal Edwin O’Brien, Grand Master of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, celebrates Mass Aug. 11 at St. Damien’s Parish in Ocean City. A long-time friend of the parish, Cardinal O’Brien is an occasional visitor to the community.
Friday, 16 August 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
A few weeks before African Cardinal Peter Turkson spoke with children at St. Mary School in Vineland on Nov. 1, he was addressing the United Nations. Cardinal Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, represented the Vatican at the Sept. 20-22 summit of heads of state and government on the Millennium Development Goals, which set out to halve poverty by 2015. Addressing the leaders Sept. 20, the Ghanaian cardinal told them that he spoke not only as a religious leader, but also as an African and a man coming from a poor family. The summit was convoked to assess the progress made in the past 10 years toward reducing poverty, combating disease, fighting hunger, protecting the environment and improving access to education. Pope Benedict XVI appointed Cardinal Turkson head of the Vatican justice and peace council just over a year ago, on Oct. 24, 2009. Cardinal Turkson, Ghana’s first cardinal, enjoyed a high profile during the 2009 second special Synod of Bishops for Africa. He served as the synod’s recording secretary — a key role many had already seen as a clear sign of papal favor. During the synod he spoke very candidly to reporters about condoms being unreliable in preventing the transmission of the HIV virus and said they may even facilitate the spread of the disease by giving people “a false sense of security” and thereby fostering promiscuity. He spoke out on the need for the Catholic notion of justice in Africa and the world. God’s justice does not demand payment for wrongdoing “because God overlooks our transgressions ... and admits us into communion,” he said during the Oct. 5 press conference. When Christians think like God does, they begin to forgive one another and recognize each other as brothers and sisters no matter what their nationality or ethnicity, he said. Contributing to this story was Catholic News Service.
Thursday, 04 November 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/That All May Be One
Author:Father Joseph D. Wallace
I am honored to announce that His Eminence, William Henry Cardinal Keeler, Archbishop-Emeritus of the Baltimore, Md., along with Rabbi Eugene Korn, the North American Director of the Center for Christian-Jewish Understanding and Cooperation, will receive the Catholic-Jewish Commission of Southern New Jersey’s, Nostra Aetate Award. The Symposium and Award Ceremony that will take place Thursday, May 14 at 7:30 p.m. at the brand new synagogue, Congregation Beth El, 8000 Main Street, Voorhees, is free and open to the public and will be followed by refreshments. Cardinal Keeler is no stranger to our parts as his cousin Dr. Louis Keeler lives in Cherry Hill. Cardinal Keeler grew up in Lebanon, Pa., and received his early seminary training at St. Charles Seminary, Overbrook, Pa.. He was ordained a priest for the Diocese of Harrisburg, Pa. He received a licentiate in sacred theology and a doctorate in canon law from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. As secretary to Bishop Leech, Bishop of Harrisburg, during the Second Vatican Council meetings in Rome, he was appointed peritus or “special advisor” to the Council by Pope John XXIII. Eventually, he was ordained an Auxiliary Bishop and Ordinary of the Harrisburg Diocese. Pope John Paul II appointed him Archbishop of Baltimore and elevated him to the College of Cardinals. As an influential participant in a wide range of national and international issues, Cardinal Keeler was elected president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB). As part of his work with the NCCB, Cardinal Keeler developed a reputation for effectively building interfaith bridges. He is particularly noted for his work in furthering Catholic-Jewish dialogue and serves as moderator of Catholic-Jewish relations for the USCCB. Rabbi Korn was an adjunct professor of jewish thought at Seton Hall, University in N.J. He earned a doctorate in moral philosophy from Columbia University and was ordained by the Israeli Rabbinate. He was previously the national director of interfaith affairs for the Anti-Defamation League and a Senior Research Fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem. Dr. Korn is a scholar in the areas of Jewish life and values, Israel and Jewish-Christian relations. He has published numerous scholarly essays on Jewish ethics, Israel and religious pluralism, tradition, extremism and Jewish values, as well as Jewish-Christian relations. This will be the second granting of the Nostra Aetate Award, given by our Catholic-Jewish Commission. “Nostra Aetate,” Latin for “In our time” was promulgated by Pope Paul VI and the Second Vatican Council Fathers. It said that the Catholic Church “deplores the hatred, persecutions and displays of anti-Semitism directed against the Jews at any time and from any source.” Cardinal Keeler recently said, “Nostra Aetate pointed out for Catholics that we hold in common with the Jewish people the Torah and the Prophets.” “This” he said “enabled Catholics and Jews to share the same traditions of faith.” At a similar recognition ceremony four years ago, Cardinal Keeler warned against those who deny the Holocaust or minimize the ingredients of prejudice. He warned that “even today the words of Jesus are wrongly manipulated to justify anti-Semitism, as they were by the Nazis.” “Christ’s Scriptures should never again be twisted to justify hate,” he added. When speaking of our present Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, he mentioned that they have known one another and been friends for over 22 years. He assured the audience that Pope Benedict will continue the work of Pope John Paul II in interfaith outreach. He shared some of the brief conversation he had with the pope, whom he called “a gentle person” who “reminds me of my mother.” It will truly be a historic gathering on May 14 at Congregation Beth El when these two lions of interfaith dialogue receive their awards and address the progress made over the past 50 years. Years made historically relevant in interfaith progress because of their good work! I hope you will be able to join us as we honor and thank these two interfaith heroes. It will also be the first public affair at the newly constructed synagogue Congregation Beth El at the Main Street complex in Voorhees. 
Thursday, 30 April 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Maria D'Antonio
The Paul VI High School girl’s soccer team collected small snacks for former Paul VI soccer players who are away at college. They mailed care packages to all respective colleges that the former Lady Eagles are now attending. Pictured from left are Brittany Ratcliffe, Rachel Reustle, Deandre Turchi, Becky Sparks, Jocelyn Rhea and Rachel Bruce.
Thursday, 07 May 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Classifieds/Health Care
Author:Paul Worthington
CAREGIVER/COMPANION by Polish Home Helper. 24 hrs/7 days. Certified Home Health Aide. Personal care companion, cleaning. Call & leave message, 856-488-0055
Thursday, 26 June 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Classifieds/Services
Author:Paul Worthington
Caring Catholic seeking to look after senior citizen in their home on a part time basis. Hours flexible. I have my own transportation. Light cooking & cleaning. Villanova graduate. Call 856-795-2886.
Thursday, 10 July 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Students at Our Lady of the Angels School in Kigali, Rwanda. Sister Thierry Dominique, left, and Sister Anna Beata Murekatete, from the Benebikira Sisters Foundation, discuss their work with survivors of the Rwanda genocide at Rutgers-Camden on Oct. 3. Photo by James A. McBride CAMDEN — In 100 days during 1994-95, Rwandans from the majority Hutu tribe hacked to death nearly 1 million minority Tutsis and moderate Hutus. Two Roman Catholic nuns from the Benebikira Sisters Foundation visited students of Rutgers-Camden here Oct. 3 to discuss their work with child survivors of the genocide. Sister Anna Beata Murekatete and Sister Thierry Dominique work in the orphanage and school that the Benebikira Sisters congregation started for children affected by the Rwandan genocide. They spoke in the faculty lounge at Armitage Hall on campus. Founded in 2007, the Benebikira Sisters Foundation raises money to expand the sister’s efforts to help the children affected by the 1994 violence. The Benebikira Sisters Foundation’s primary project is Notre Dame des Anges (Our Lady of the Angels) School in Kigali, Rwanda, a former Benebikira convent turned into a place of learning for PreK-12th graders. The Benebikira Sisters work in all nine dioceses of the country, educating more than 5,000 students in seven primary schools and 13 secondary schools; running and working in local hospitals and health centers; and running three orphanages for 375 children affected by the genocide. Sister Anna is the co-founder of the Benebikira Sisters Foundation and director of the Notre Dame des Anges School. Sister Thierry is Mother General of the Benebikira Sisters and the director for its Continued Training Center. The sisters’ presentation consisted of slides highlighting Rwanda’s history, and photos demonstrating the aftermath of the 1994 genocide, and the construction of Our Lady of Angels School. The event was sponsored by the departments of childhood studies and philosophy and religion at Rutgers-Camden.
Thursday, 11 October 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Children enjoy the rides June 23 at the second annual carnival at Holy Name of Jesus Parish, Mullica Hill. Above, Caroline and Sarah Ferguson reach for the sky. Left, Lucy Michaels and Parker McDonnell steer their boat ride. Photos by Alan M. Dumoff/More photos www.ccdphotoalbum.com
Friday, 17 July 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Admin2
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff Casi O’Connor, 3, of Glassboro, enjoys a ride at the carnival at St. Margaret School, Woodbury Heights, on May 28.
Friday, 04 June 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Carmela Malerba
It’s carnival season again at parishes throughout the Diocese of Camden, and St. Matthew Regional School recently held their annual carnival at St. Margaret Parish, Woodbury Heights. Stephen Miller (in car), enjoys one of the rides, and Judith Maltese, left, liked the merry-go-round on May 24. But not everyone was having such a good time. Susan Hughes, decided the moving cup ride was not her cup of tea. Photos by Alan M. Dumoff
Thursday, 09 June 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
  Carol Ann Pasley-Maddaloni, 50, the sister of Father Robert Pasley, died Saturday, Aug. 8, at her home in Woodbury Heights. Born in Woodbury, she was raised in Woodbury Heights, and was a graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She was employed as a computer analyst with IBM and EDS in Camp Hill, Pa. She took great pride in making her house into a home by decorating and gardening, and also loved to travel and take photographs, leaving countless photos chronicling her life's most enjoyable moments. Mrs. Pasley-Maddaloni is the wife of 13 years to John F. Maddaloni; daughter of Anna D. (nee Gizelbach) and the late Charles F. Pasley; sister of Father Robert C. Pasley, rector, Mater Ecclesiae Mission, Berlin, David A. Pasley and his wife Dianne, and James A. Pasley; aunt of Rachel and Alexander Pasley. She also leaves a legacy of many close friends and colleagues. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Aug. 13 at St. Margaret Church, Woodbury Heights. Interment was at St. Joseph Cemetery, Chews Landing. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to: American Cancer Society 2600 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902.
Thursday, 20 August 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
968. Caroling
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Admin2
Young singers perform at the living Nativity presented by St. Vincent de Paul Regional School, Mays Landing, on Dec. 14. The students sang "Twinkle, Twinkle Christmas Star," "Silent Night" and other songs. Admission was a non-perishable food item. Photo by Alan M. Dumoff
Thursday, 20 December 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Carolyn R. (Montone) Ampula, 57, of Egg Harbor Township, a founding member of the Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra, passed away on Monday, May 12 after a two-year battle with cancer. Born in Camden, Egg Harbor Township has been her home forthe past 34 years. Carolyn’s singing debut began at the age of four while singing “Blue Suede Shoes” to anyone who would listen. A University of Dayton Music Education major, she was a featured soloist with Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra, a South Jersey professional performing arts organization which started in December 1991, and was a past president. Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra led to her dream of performing at Carnegie Hall in New York City. The group also performed at the Center for the Performing Arts in Sewell, and at the Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall in New York. “She was an outstanding person of exceptional character,” remembered Rev. Msgr. Louis Marucci, executive director of Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra. “What made her most unique was that not only did she sing magnificently, but she lived what she sang. She had a song in her heart that pointed to the Lord in a profound way. She will be tremendously missed.”
Thursday, 22 May 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
News/Latest News
Author:Ellis, Robert
Author Mary Jane Hurley Brant is pictured with her daughter Katie, who died at the age of 28 from a brain tumor. Camden Catholic High School Alum Mary Jane Hurley Brant is an expert on grief counseling. Her vocation, Brant has realized, is in helping others find hope after loss. Brant’s perspectives were formed by her professional career as a certified group psychotherapist and her two decades of work with hospice patients. She holds a master’s degree in counseling and human relations, and is author of the book “When Every Day Matters.” Brant has expanded her forum with a growing presence on the internet, the radio and at seminars and retreats, as she reaches out to those who are experiencing the feelings of loss associated with divorce, career or the death of loved ones. Brant has her own story of personal loss. For 10 years, she waited, watched and prayed as her beloved daughter battled a brain tumor. At age 28, her beautiful Katie, “with her long strawberry-blonde hair, big turquoise eyes, and larger-than-life presence” finally succumbed to the cancer. On her website, Brant gives the reality that she lived with: “Brain tumors now have the dubious distinction of being the leading cause of cancer death in children under the age of 20, surpassing acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Brain tumors are also the third leading cause of cancer death in young adults ages 20-39.” Brant watched her daughter as her daughter made significant accomplishments in her short life, including the founding of Katie’s Kids for the Cure, a national research foundation with the “singular goal of finding a cure for pediatric brain tumors.” Katie graduated from University of Pennsylvania and began a career in New York City. (Brant occasionally wears Katie’s sorority pin, one of the ways she tries to keep Katie close to her.) Brant often talks about what she learned from her daughter: the courage to move forward, the gratitude for every day, and faith. “Katie would ask me what I was grateful for,” Brant tells others. “Believe me,” she confides,  “there were some days when I wasn’t sure.” Brant said that even when a death is imminent, the emotional turmoil rages. “At first, I felt so stunned,” Brant relates. “The world felt very different. I felt like I wasn’t even in the world, even though I knew I was. “The sadness was monumental,” Brant said. “I longed for Katie. I had to do something.” Brant started journaling. “I wrote almost daily for an entire year, keeping my communion with Katie alive, sustaining her presence.…” Brant confides that she finally came face-to-face with the reality of life after Katie. In her journal, Brant considered the choices that lay before her: “I can be absent from my present life and the lives of others who need and love me and whom I need and love. I can give up the future and live in my past memories. Or I can accept the beauty and the bounty that I learned from being your mother and trust that I will survive without you.” At that moment, Brant wrote, she didn’t know which choice she would make. Later Brant explained that the letters “were my journey back to life.” Ten years later, Brant’s letters were published in her book, “When Every Day Matters: A Mother’s Memoir on Love, Loss and Life”  (Simple Abundance Press 2008). In the book, Brant weaves her personal experiences with a rainbow of inspirational perspectives and quotations from others who have loved and lost. Brant reflects on her own family dynamics, looking back to her own father’s death, the influences of her family, friends and circumstances, and the tides of faith that sustain her. Brant often talks about her faith. Was there anger with God? Anything to do with Katie and anger was “incongruent,” Brant said. “I was disappointed with God. Why couldn't he make her well?” To her, asking where Katie is now was the same as asking where Katie came from. “That’s the mystery. We have to accept it on faith….” “As Catholics,” Brant said, “we have to believe that all will be well. We have to accept that on faith. Don’t keep trying to figure it out,” she adds, “because you’re not going to. And that takes the burden away. “But,” she added, “all won’t be well for a long time. We’ll find a way to transcend our pain.” Brant emphasizes that in grieving there must be hope — and that will help manage the time and the sorrow. “Hope…because you are a believer,” she says. After Katie’s death, Brant said that she did not turn to the church. She found it painful to be in the same church where Katie’s funeral was held. “ I couldn’t take my eyes off of the spot where Katie’s coffin was.” The family relocated but eventually returned to the Philadelphia area. Brant began to miss the connections that she had formed in her previous parish. “I returned,” she said, “and suddenly my soul was aligned with my everyday life.” Brant’s writings mull over faith issues and cultural expectations. “In today’s culture, there is a ‘get over it’ mentality, Brant said. People begin to prod the grieving, she said. They’ll ask, “When are you going to start doing this? It’s been months. When are you going to start living?” Brant counsels, “The heart and soul are very slow to heal.” “Don’t put time pressure on yourself,” advises Brant. “Don’t accept the world’s projection ‘to get on with it.’ You need time.” Brant says that there is a way to “manage the grieving.” In her blog, Brant wrote, “I understand completely that none of us can get over our losses until we go through them. I would like to be your guide to the other side of life, to the other side of your loss. I hope that you will let me. Until then, Make Your Every Day Matter.” Today Brant is conveying her message in wider realms, across a chasm of hurts and losses that often crush the spirit. As a certified leader of Simple Abundance seminars and workshops, she promotes the work of her friend and author Sarah Ban Breathnach, whose Principles of Simple Abundance (Gratitude, Simplicity, Order, Harmony, Beauty and Joy) have become a roadmap for spiritual reflection and renewal. In October, Brant will be the keynote speaker for the Caretakers’ Retreat at the Malvern Retreat House, Malvern, Pa. She will explore the “enormous and universal purpose” of doing a service for someone else. “Givers” are those who take care of a sick family member, or lead a congregation, or attend to someone’s spiritual or medical needs, or protect and keep others safe, explains Brant. In her blog, Brant writes that there is great meaning in that. “Where would any of us be without the givers in our lives? Besides doing a really good thing, you’ve lessened someone else’s load today. And that made today meaningful. That made today matter.”    
Thursday, 27 August 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Jeh C. Johnson
Este año habrá una cantidad récord de niños que cruzarán la frontera sur de los Estados Unidos de forma ilegal. Tan solo en el mes de mayo, la cantidad de niños no acompañados por su madre o su padre que cruzaron nuestra frontera sur alcanzó una cifra superior a los 9.000, con lo cual la cifra total en lo que va de año se acerca a los 47.000. La mayoría de dichos niños provienen de Honduras, El Salvador y Guatemala, donde la violencia generada por las drogas y las pandillas aterroriza a la sociedad. Tengo un mensaje muy simple para los padres de esos niños: mandar a su hijo o hija a viajar ilegalmente a Estados Unidos no es la solución. Mandar a un niño a realizar el largo viaje desde América Central hasta Estados Unidos es peligroso. Las redes criminales de tráfico de personas que usted contrata para que lleven a su hijo a los Estados Unidos no tienen ninguna consideración por la seguridad y el bienestar de los niños: para ellos, su hijo es una mercancía a entregar a cambio de dinero. En manos de los contrabandistas, muchos niños experimentan situaciones traumáticas y sufren abusos psicológicos a causa del viaje; o, lo que es peor, son golpeados, mal alimentados, violados o vendidos en el mercado del sexo y se encuentran expuestos a todo tipo de abusos psicológicos por parte de criminales. A medida que aumentan las temperaturas en julio y agosto, las condiciones para intentar cruzar nuestra frontera sur empeorarán. El largo y arduo viaje no solo es peligroso, sino que no hay permisos o salvoconductos al final. El programa Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) del Gobierno de EE.UU., también conocido con el nombre de DACA, no aplica a los niños que crucen la frontera estadounidense de forma ilegal hoy, ni a los que cruzaron ayer o cruzarán mañana. Para cumplir con los requisitos de DACA, el niño debe haber entrado a Estados Unidos antes del 15 de junio de 2007, hace siete años. Además, la legislación de reforma migratoria que se encuentra actualmente en el Congreso ofrece un camino merecido a la ciudadanía, pero solo para determinadas personas que vinieron a este país antes del 31 de diciembre de 2011, inclusive (es decir, hace dos años y medio). Así que déjenme que sea claro: no hay ningún camino que lleve a acción diferida ni a la ciudadanía, ni tampoco hay ningún recurso que el Congreso esté contemplando, para un niño que cruza nuestra frontera de forma ilegal hoy. Por el contrario, conforme a las leyes y políticas actuales de EE.UU., cualquier persona que sea detenida al cruzar ilegalmente nuestra frontera estará sujeta a deportación prioritaria, independientemente de su edad. Esto significa que si su hija o hijo resulta detenido al cruzar la frontera de forma ilegal, será acusado de violar las leyes migratorias de Estados Unidos y se iniciará un proceso de deportación en su contra: una situación nada recomendable. El documento que se emite a nombre de su hijo no es un permiso, sino un aviso de comparecencia en un proceso de deportación ante un juez de inmigración. Como Secretario de Seguridad Nacional, he visto en persona a los niños en nuestro centro de procesamiento de Texas. Como padre, observé los rostros de esos niños y vi temor y vulnerabilidad. El deseo de querer que sus hijos tengan una vida mejor en Estados Unidos es comprensible. Pero exponer a un niño no acompañado a los riesgos de la inmigración ilegal para alcanzar ese sueño es demasiado alto y los "permisos" no existen. Jeh C. Johnson Secretario del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional de EE.UU.
Thursday, 26 June 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Rich Luongo
CAMDEN — The controversial nomination of cartoonist Thomas Nast to the New Jersey Hall of Fame is stirring up debate among some people of Irish descent and Roman Catholics as well as New Jersey political figures. Lawrence Keeley, of the anti-Irish Defamation Federation in Philadelphia, said no one is denying that Nast was a world renowned cartoonist but he was also a bigot of the highest kind who disliked Irish, Catholics, and especially Irish-Catholics. “Why would New Jersey pick a bigot to honor in the Hall of Fame when there are plenty of good people — living and dead — who can be recognized?” Keeley asked. The Federation, Keeley pointed out, keeps its eye out on anything anti-Irish and anti-Irish Catholic. Nast, of Morristown (1840-1902), was a German-born caricaturist and editorial cartoonist who has been described as the “Father of the American Cartoon.” He is credited with creating enduring images of Santa Claus, Uncle Sam, the Republican Party elephant and the Democratic Party donkey. Bill Donohue, president of the Catholic League, said, “The New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHF) includes luminaries as diverse as Albert Einstein and Shaquille O’Neal. It should not be dishonored by including bigots. Thomas Nast, who made the first cut of the 50 nominees for the class of 2012, is the most bigoted cartoonist in American history.” According to Donohue, Nast’s cartoons show “a long and pernicious pattern of bigotry born of nativism.” Among his portrayal of Catholics and Irish, Nash depicted the Irish as a race of inferior gorillas and he demonized the church “as a nefarious institution threatening America’s public schools.” Donohue said he contacted Don Jay Smith, executive director of the NJHF, asking that Nast’s nomination be withdrawn. Assemblyman Wayne DeAngelo, (D-Mercer) also contacted Smith asking for the withdrawal of Nast’s name. The assemblyman indicated that in the midst of Nast’s political cartoons such as the depiction of Uncle Sam and the Democratic Party’s donkey and the Republicans’ elephant are “works that are racially charged and offensive.” He said the works that depict Irish Catholics in a demeaning light are “inflammatory and offensive to the thousands of Irish Catholics who call New Jersey home.” Assemblyman Scott Rudder (R-Burlington) is also calling for the Hall of Fame to eliminate Nast from the list of 2012 inductees. “Thomas Nast’s depictions of Santa Claus are beloved, but his portrayal of Irish Catholics was deplorable,” said Rudder, who is proud of his Irish heritage. “Nast’s inclusion on the public ballot for induction to the Hall of Fame is not only insulting to New Jersey residents of Irish descent or Catholic faith, but to people of every group that has been victimized by bigotry and stereotyping. I have asked the executive director of the Hall of Fame to have him removed from consideration immediately.” Donohue noted that the Hall of Fame calls itself “a source of learning, inspiration, and hope for children.” He said, “Nast was not a significant and powerful role model for children in the 19th century and he sure is not a role model for any U.S. citizen today.”
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
LA HABANA (CNS) — El presidente cubano Raúl Castro anunció que su país liberará 2,900 presos políticos durante la primavera, movida que atribuye parcialmente a la venidera visita del papa Benedicto XVI. Castro dijo en un discurso ante la Asamblea Nacional que el Consejo de Estado había tomado en consideración la visita papal, así como las solicitudes de miembros de familias de presos y de altos funcionarios católicos. Él también mencionó el 400mo aniversario de la Virgen de la Caridad del Cobre, patrona de Cuba. El papa Benedicto XVI ha dicho que visitará Cuba y México antes de la Pascua, aunque las fechas oficiales no han sido anunciadas. Cuba liberó aproximadamente 50 presos políticos en el 2010, movida que el cardenal Jaime Ortega Alamino de La Habana dijo fue popular dentro del país pero aun más importante para las relaciones exteriores. El trato de Cuba hacia los opositores políticos ha sido durante mucho tiempo un elemento clave en el embargo económico estadounidense contra la nación durante 50 años. Castro dijo ante la Asamblea Nacional el 23 de diciembre que los liberados incluirían enfermos, ancianos, mujeres y jóvenes que tengan potencial de reintegrarse a la sociedad cubana.
Thursday, 05 January 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Foto CNS/Desmond Boylan, Reuters Fuera del seminario nacional católico se puede ver una estatua de Cristo, en aledaños de la Habana, el 3 de noviembre. El presidente cubano Raúl Castro se reunió con el arzobispo Thomas G. Wenski de Miami y otros dirigentes católicos en la inauguración del seminario, la primera construcción católica que se lleva a cabo en la isla en más de medio siglo. LA HABANA, Cuba (CNS) — En una ceremonia en la que participó el presidente Raúl Castro, los obispos católicos de Cuba inauguraron el seminario de San Carlos y San Ambrosio, el 3 de noviembre, que constituye la primera construcción de envergadura relacionada con la iglesia en un lapso de medio siglo, a partir de la revolución iniciada por Fidel Castro. Acompañado por los obispos de Cuba y representantes del Vaticano y de la Iglesia Católica de los Estados Unidos, de México, de Italia y de las Bahamas, el cardenal de la Habana, Jaime Ortega Alamino, hizo notar que el finado papa Juan Pablo II había bendecido la primera piedra del nuevo seminario en una Misa celebrada en el mes de enero del año de 1998, durante su visita a la isla. Fidel Castro, que en ese entonces era el presidente, prometió apoyo para el proyecto, dijo el cardenal. "Esa promesa ha sido fielmente cumplida", dijo, añadiendo sus gracias para los hermanos Castro, pues "ese trabajo había sido terminado apropiadamente con la ayuda del estado". En medio de los 300 concurrentes invitados a la apertura oficial, se encontraba el nuncio apostólico ante Cuba, arzobispo Giovanni Becciu; el arzobispo de Miami, Thomas G. Wenski; Carl Anderson, supremo caballero de los Caballeros de Colón y el arzobispo mexicano Emilio Berlie Belaunzarán de Yucatán. En un mensaje enviado a nombre del papa Benedicto XVI se decía que esperaba que la inauguración del seminario fuera "una señal y un estímulo de un renovado compromiso para esforzarse cuidadosamente por una preparación humana, espiritual y académica" de los futuros ministros del sacerdocio. En el mensaje, enviado al cardenal Ortega por el secretario de estado del Vaticano, cardenal Tarcisio Bertone, se invitaba a los seminaristas a que "aumentaran su identificación con los sentimientos de Cristo, el Buen Pastor, por medio de la oración asidua, seria dedicación al estudio, apertura humilde para la divina palabra, digna celebración de los sacramentos y testimonio valeroso de su amor como auténticos discípulos y misioneros del Evangelio de salvación". El seminario tiene cupo para 100 estudiantes y abrirá sus puertas el próximo año. Está localizado en 54 acres de antigua tierra de labranza, al sureste de la Habana. En el periódico mexicano La Jornada se explicaba que en el año 1966, en los primeros días del régimen de Castro, cuando las tensiones con la iglesia eran altas, la iglesia se vio forzada a entregarle al gobierno el antiguo seminario de San Carlos y San Ambrosio, construido en 1948. Las clases se cambiaron a un claustro colonial clásico en el distrito histórico de la Habana, en donde se han impartido hasta ahora. Este edificio se convertirá en centro cultural y de estudio, con biblioteca y espacio para exhibiciones, conciertos, teatro y cinematografía. El otro único seminario católico del país está en Santiago de Cuba, en la costa del sudeste. La construcción del nuevo seminario de San Carlos y San Ambrosio empezó en 2006. La piedra que bendijo el papa Juan Pablo se encuentra resguardada en una caja de vidrio, a la entrada del seminario. La iglesia se hizo cargo del costo total del trabajo con donaciones privadas, comunidades e instituciones católicas internacionales. El cardenal Ortega les dio las gracias a los donantes, incluyendo las Conferencias Episcopales de los Estados Unidos, Italia y Alemania; la Comisión Pontificia de Latinoamérica; los Caballeros de Colón; y católicos de los Estados Unidos, Francia, España y varios países latinoamericanos. La inauguración del seminario de San Carlos y San Ambrosio coincide con una notable mejora de las relaciones entre la Iglesia Católica y el estado, después de 50 años de serio forcejeo. Los analistas describen la situación actual como "más relajada", desde el proceso de diálogo iniciado con una reunión en mayo de Raúl Castro, el cardenal Ortega y el arzobispo de Santiago, Dionisio García Ibáñez, presidente de la Conferencia Episcopal Cubana.
Thursday, 11 November 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
St. Andrew the Apostle Parish, Gibbsboro, will host an open house July 29, 7-8 p.m., on Catechesis of the Good Shepherd. Originating in 1954, Catechesis of the Good Shepherd is based on Montessori principles of education, rooted in Scripture and the liturgy, and meant to foster a personal relationship with God. The catechesis takes place in an atrium, a place specifically prepared by the parish and recalling the place in the early church where the first Christians received their formation in the faith. It is designed as a place of prayer and hands-on work that is chosen by each child. The open house will be held in the parish center. Catechists, directors of religious education and clergy are invited. For information or to register, contact Kate Vukicevich, 856-783-0550, katev@standrewsrc.com
Thursday, 24 July 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/Lifelong Faith Formation
Author:Sister Kathy Burton, SSJ
Celebrating the ministry of faith formation in parishes This Sunday, thousands of parishes across the country will begin their catechetical year with the commissioning of all persons involved in the ministry of faith formation. In the past, this would involve a special liturgy, acknowledging those persons teaching in the parish religious education programs, often followed by coffee and ... in the parish hall. And so the year began.... Or did it? Over the past few years our bishops have challenged all of us to think differently. This year's theme for Catechetical Sunday, "Open Wide the Door of Faith," is a more direct challenge to all of us to "think outside the box" as we continue to form and re-form our parish faith formation ministry. If we really are serious about "Opening Wide the Door of Faith," we must consider the ramifications of this call. James Joyce once described the Catholic Church as, "Here comes Everyone...." If this is true, then we must think differently about parish faith formation. In the past, faith formation was commonly understood as involving primarily children, graded, taking place on Sunday morning or after school. With the publication of Catechesi Tradendae in October of 1979, the General Directory for Catechesis, 1997, and the National Directory for Catechesis in 2005, pastors and parish staffs were charged with re-visioning the catechetical ministry in their parishes. These documents urge parish staffs to develop faith formation plans that are holistic, integrated and occurring in all stages of life. In response, many of our parishes have already embraced the challenge to open wide the door of faith and welcome "everyone." Many parishes have creatively re-fashioned their catechetical ministries to include intergenerational models, inviting all ages to participate in formation events. Realizing the calendar demands on families during the school year, many parishes have begun summer religious education opportunities for children while helping families to integrate faith and family life throughout the year. Respecting the parents' primary role in their children's faith formation, some parishes have also begun to offer structured home schooling for families. These are offered along with the traditional classroom option. All of these options exist to help families as they struggle to pass their faith onto their children. With all of this, we still need to reach out to those who are on the edge, our youth, young adults, our maturing adults, and our seniors. How do we help facilitate their continuing formation? This year, responding to the challenge to open wide the door to faith, pastors, parish staffs, and parish catechetical leaders are invited to embrace the call to look more inclusively at the ministry of faith formation in their parish. All are challenged to look more deliberatively at the way we develop formation opportunities. As the church so often reminds us, faith formation is lifelong. We can no longer assess our parish's formation ministry by the number of children we have registered in our programs. Rather, we must examine all ways we offer opportunities for formation at all stages of life. As we continue to offer formation opportunities in our parishes, we can only remember Dorothy's famous quote from The Wizard of Oz, "Toto, we're not in Kansas anymore." Sister Kathy Burton, SSJ is co-director of Faith and Family Life Formation, Office of Lifelong Faith Formation, Diocese of Camden.
Thursday, 12 September 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Photos by James A. McBride Msgr. James R. Tracy, pastor of St. Charles Borromeo Parish, Sicklerville, congratulates Sandra Borkowski, who is one of 46 catechists to complete Level 1 certification through the Office of Religious Education. Another 20 completed certification for Level 2. The catechists were honored on Saturday, Jan. 31, at St. Charles. Pictured at far right is Elizabeth O. Field, interim director, Office of Religious Education. Bottom photo: Msgr. Tracy addresses a group of catechists.
Friday, 06 February 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/Office of Religious Education
On Saturday, Jan. 31, 66 catechists — teachers of the faith in parish religious education programs and in Catholic elementary schools — will celebrate completing a level of certification being offered through the Office of Religious Education. Forty-six catechists will complete certification for Level 1; 20 for Level 2. The bishop, as the chief catechist of his diocese, and the one who is specifically responsible for the transmission of the faith, “should … ensure that [catechists] proclaim the authentic Gospel of Jesus Christ and hand on the complete and accurate deposit of faith” (National Directory for Catechesis, 54, B). Even though “[c]atechesis is the responsibility of the entire Christian community” and is a collaborative effort, the Office for Religious Education is the “means which the Bishop … utilizes to direct and moderate … the catechetical activities of the diocese.” (NDC, 59, C) For many years, the Camden Diocese’s Office for Religious Education has been offering courses in theology and methodology to assists catechists in their catechetical ministry that they might be able to fulfill their duties well and fully. “Catechists are called to continual conversion and growth in their faith and … to on-going spiritual formation” says the NDC (55, C).  In 1999, the bishops of the United States published the document, “Our Hearts Were Burning Within Us (42) which again stated that the catechetical ministry is “essential to who we are and what we do as Church and must be situated not at the periphery of the Church’s educational mission, but at its center.” Thus, catechists who proclaim the Good News of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, hold a central and honored role in the work of the Church and therefore, have a right to expect quality support and assistance from their diocese. We congratulate, thank and celebrate our catechists being certified this year. We know that they, and their families, have made many sacrifices for them to be able to acquire their level of certification. The catechists have indeed manifested both dedication and determination to be the best catechists they can be. For those being certified at Level 1, they have taken 60 hours of in-seat classes, taken time for outside reading, study, prayer and reflection while striving to make age-appropriate applications of their learning for their students. Catechists attaining a Level 2 Certificate have given an additional 48 hours of in-seat class work, plus outside reading, study, prayer, reflection and application. Only with sound and quality educational and spiritual formation can catechists truly fulfill their goal and mission which is to lead others to an intimate relationship with Jesus Christ. Msgr. James R. Tracy, pastor of St. Charles Borromeo Church, Sicklerville, will preside and be the homilist at the 10 a.m. Mass on Jan. 31. Dominican Sister Peggy Devlin will be the guest speaker following a reception in the basement of church. Elizabeth O. Field is interim director, Office of Religious Education, Diocese of Camden.
Thursday, 29 January 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
Cathedral Pantry volunteers at The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Camden, prepare homemade soup and donated food items to serve those in need this week during the coldest days of the year. The Cathedral staff welcomed all into the Cathedral Hall for warmth and served hot soup, sandwiches, beverages and desserts. Pictured, from left, are Susan Mackey, Mary Ann Toci, Irma Pacheco, Rita Maldonado and Marie Marsh. Photo by Maria D'Antonio
Thursday, 09 January 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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CAMDEN — Cathedral Kitchen has partnered with Camden County College to create a mural for the entrance of its new facility scheduled to open this fall. The free-standing mural was designed by Kay Klotzbach, local artist and professor of art at Camden County College (CCC). Her design includes a combination of tile, glass and mirror. She has collaborated with Joe Brenman, a well-known Philadelphia artist who has produced several dozen public murals. His experience in the mosaic medium will ensure creation of a piece that can endure the outdoor elements.
Thursday, 31 July 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Author:Admin2
Karen A. Talarico, executive director of the Cathedral Kitchen, Camden, will be one of three Italian-Americans honored tomorrow night at the Sons of Italy New Jersey Foundation’s fundraiser, the 2010 Purple Aster Charity Ball, to be held at the Tropicana Casino and Resort in Atlantic City. Talarico will receive the foundation’s Golden Lion Award for her contribution to the community, charity, and fostering a positive image of Italians in America. The Sons of Italy New Jersey Foundation is the philanthropic arm of the Grand Lodge of New Jersey, Order of Sons of Italy in America, the oldest and largest national organization for men and women of Italian descent. The Cathedral Kitchen is an independent nonprofit that provides meals and services to the poor in the city of Camden. Also receiving the Golden Lion Award will be Marlene Z. Asselta, president of SNJDC, a non-profit organization founded in 1951 to promote responsible economic development in South Jersey, and Anthony F. Cappacio, president and business manager of Laborers Local 172. “We’re pleased to have the opportunity to pay tribute to three distinguished Italian-Americans, for their strong leadership, professional accomplishments and commitment to community service.  We are recognizing these award recipients not only for their unique contributions and dedication to their respective professions, but also for their ability to serve as a source of inspiration to the strong legacy of Italian Americans,” said Thomas A. Bergbauer, Jr., president of the Sons of Italy New Jersey Foundation. For more information about the Sons of Italy Foundation, visit www.sonsofitaly.org
Thursday, 08 April 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Rich Luongo
CAMDEN — Not only can you get a good meal at the Cathedral Kitchen (CK), but you can also make arrangements to have professional quality dental work done in the newly-opened dental clinic. On May 10 a ribbon cutting ceremony launched the clinic that offers free dental care supplied by Project Smiles for Camden residents, including guests of the Cathedral Kitchen, culinary arts students, and referrals from other human services agencies in the city. Colleen Rini, public information director, said when the facility moved into its new building at 1514 Federal Street in 2008, health and dental care were to be included in the facility along with enhanced cooking and dining facilities. “A medical suite was to be part of the extended program in the building,” she said, “which would include Project Smiles and Project HOPE for medical screenings and referrals.” Project Smiles, Rini explained, is an organization of dentists, hygienists, and dental assistants who will offer their services twice a week for any impoverished resident in Camden, noting that the volunteers have worked in New Orleans, Nicaragua, and Mexico, among other places. “You don’t have to just eat at the Kitchen to qualify for services,” Rini said. She pointed out that the clinic was outfitted with equipment donated by such suppliers as Patterson Dental Supply and Belmont. The clinic will provide cleaning, extractions, and scalings with two local dental labs offering discount fees as part of a denture fund to construct dentures for clinic patients. Although the clinic and the Kitchen are not part of the Diocese of Camden, Rini pointed out that the building the CK now calls home was partially funded with a $250,000 grant from the diocese. “This was done to encourage other funders to take part,” Rini said. The food is donated from various sources such as Capital Grill, Red Lobster, and Classic Cake. FEMA provides a grant for food. “We essentially buy the protein,” Rini said. “Everything else is donated.” Although fast food chains don’t provide food, McDonald’s, as an example, will hire the CK’s culinary arts graduates. Rini said 20 from the third class of graduates are being hired by McD’s this year. The Culinary Arts Training Program was launched in 2009. Besides Projects Smiles, Project HOPE, and culinary arts, the South Jersey Eye Center will bring its mobile van to the CK once a month for free eye exams and will provide free eyeglasses, South Jersey Legal Services provides legal advice twice a month, the homeless are given space for showers and to do laundry, and for haircuts and even massages. For more information about the Cathedral Kitchen, contact Rini at 964-6771, extension 104.
Friday, 14 May 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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The inaugural culinary arts class of the Cathedral Kitchen, Camden, pose for a photo on graduation day, May 8. Many of the students have already been offered employment.  CAMDEN – Cathedral Kitchen (CK), a nonprofit organization that has been  feeding the poor of Camden since 1976, announced the graduation of its inaugural class of culinary arts students that took place on May 8.  The 14-week Culinary Arts Training (CAT) program included academic instruction and training in cooking techniques. The students also gained food preparation work experience as they helped the kitchen staff to prepare the hundreds of meals CK serves each day. Students also participated in life skills, financial literacy and interviewing skills workshops as part of their course of study.  During the second week of March they took part in mock interviews at local restaurants. The final part of the CAT curriculum included two-week internships in April at Seasons 52, Nordstrom’s Café, Old Country Buffet, McDonalds, The Pop Shop, the Merchantville Country Club, Nunzio Ristorante Rustico, the Flagship Resort in Atlantic City, and the Sodexo kitchen at the Campbell Soup Company’s world headquarters. Many of the students have already been offered employment following graduation. Hiring companies include Nordstrom’s Café, Old Country Buffet, The Pop Shop, McDonald’s, and The Telford Inn.  Program Manager Rita Cinelli will continue to work with the remaining graduates to help secure positions in the culinary industry. To evaluate the long-term success of the program, the employment status of all graduates will be tracked for a minimum of one year. CK’s Chef Jonathan Jernigan said, “The students and staff were strangers from all walks of life 14 weeks ago, but today we have all learned from each other and become like family. These students have reached goals they never thought possible and their lives have been changed forever. They have gone from thinking: Can we do this? To, ‘Yes, we can.’” Top student Vincent Clayton said at the ceremony, “I’ve lived in Camden all my life and I’ve seen my share of negative press about the city. Today we have something to be proud of. It is programs such as these that give hope to the people of Camden. “Since we are Cathedral Kitchen’s first Culinary Arts Training class, we are the trailblazers of the program,” he said. “We carry a lot of weight on our shoulders and we will always be the model for future classes. That’s why it is important that we go into our homes, communities and the workplace and show everyone the kind of students that Cathedral Kitchen is graduating.” This inaugural class of students, ranging from 22 to 60 years of age, was recruited from homeless shelters, transitional housing facilities, halfway houses, veterans’ organizations, CK’s dinner client population and other organizations working within the Camden community. Each enrolled student was unemployed and at high risk of becoming homeless should he or she not acquire the skills to become employable. Cathedral Kitchen’s mission is to provide meals and other services to the poor and needy in the City of Camden. Last year more than 98,000 meals were served to those in need. For more information about Cathedral Kitchen, contact Executive Director Karen Talarico at 856964-6771 or karen@cathedralkitchen.org or visit the website at www.cathedralkitchen.org.
Thursday, 14 May 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Cathedral Kitchen graduated its third class from the organization’s Culinary Arts Training Program. Pictured here are valedictorians Tam Phung, John Entwistle, and Victor Malave with graduation ceremony emcee Terry Ruggles of NBC 10 News. Of the 14 students who completed the program, eight have found jobs to date.
Thursday, 17 June 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Brother David Graber M.SS.CC. from St. Augustine Preparatory School, Richland, was awarded the “Quarter Century Award” by the Cathedral Kitchen, Camden, on Feb. 21 for his more than two decades of service as a volunteer. Several times a month he and a group of students help serve Cathedral Kitchen’s dinner guests. He is pictured with Sister Jean Spena, who received a Proclamation from the County Freeholders on her retirement after 10 years of service.
Thursday, 04 March 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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CAMDEN — Cathedral Kitchen recently announced the appointment of Rita Cinelli as program manager. In her new role, Cinelli will be responsible for implementing the organization’s first programmatic expansions into new service areas since its meal program was founded 32 years ago. Cinelli’s most recent position was as program director for the Jewish Camden Partnership, managing its educational initiative in Camden. Prior experience included several positions with Wyndham Hotels, including director of sales and marketing. “For the past seven years, Cathedral Kitchen has been working to build a new facility that will become a permanent home for our work to provide nutritious meals for those less fortunate,” said Cathedral Kitchen executive director Karen Talarico.
Thursday, 26 June 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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CAMDEN — The Cathedral Kitchen in Camden here is working with the Jewish Camden Partnership (JCP) to provide healthy snacks for anafter-school literacy program at George Washington Elementary School in Camden. The program, entitled Camden STARS (Students Achieving Reading Success), is organized and run by JCP, along with support from its program partner Christus Lutheran Church. Teen tutors and adult mentors provide help with homework andliteracy training for 32 students twice a week from October to May. JCP’s program director, Rita Cinelli, was looking for analternative to junk food snacks. The Cathedral Kitchen’s program committeedeveloped a school-approved list of healthier snacks that could be purchased and packaged by volunteer groups and delivered to the school without needing refrigeration. Choices such as low-sugar applesauce, baked chips or crackers, raisins, fruit cups and low sugar juices or water make up a menu that is rotated each session and delivered to the school by volunteer and CK program committee member Jeanne Rodrigues.
Thursday, 14 February 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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CAMDEN — For the past 32 years the Cathedral Kitchen (CK) has been praying for its own building so it can offer more services to the needy while, at the same time, expanding its dinner program to seven days a week. On Oct. 31 those prayers will be answered. The CK will open in a 13,000-square-foot facility at 1514 Federal St.  “We’ll still be serving dinner five days a week for now,” said Karen Talarico, director of the Kitchen, “but we’re striving to also open on weekends.” She pointed out, along with the dining room, there is also a medical and dental office to help the poor with their problems.  “We’re working with Project HOPE to help the community with their medical needs,” she noted. Project HOPE (Homeless Outreach Program Enrichment) is an outreach program of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, Camden. In addition, the CK has also partnered with the South Jersey Dental Society and Camden Eye Center for their assistance, Talarico added.  The Kitchen has set up shop in various locations over the years. Before moving into its new home, it was serving meals in the gym of the old Camden Catholic High School located next to the Camden Diocesan offices.  The 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation began a search for a permanent spot in 2001 because the facility needed the room and the board of directors wanted to expand its objectives. It thought an existing building could be refurbished but nothing could be found that met the needs of the program and its future endeavors and the Camden Redevelopment Agency’s (CRA) goals and plans.  Four years ago the Clemens Construction Co. was retained as manager of the project. In 2005 DAS Architects began the design portion of the new Kitchen building which has received a LEED or green building certification that indicates it is a structure that is good for the environment.  What contributed to this classification was 5,700 tons of recycled material — donated by a local recycling company — used to build up the foundation as well as recycled material used throughout the structure, such as steel used for the building’s frame and the flooring of the dining room. And to keep costs down 20 percent of all products used in the construction were manufactured locally.  The existing building on site — the old Antrim hardware store — was demolished and because of a tank leakage the area was declared a “brownfields” site with the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection handling the clean-up. This led the way for the construction to begin in March. More than $3.8 million of the $4 million goal for the campaign has been raised,” said Talarico. “And construction finance was provided by PNC Bank.” The money is broken down this way: 35 percent public, 35 percent individuals, 22 percent private foundations, and 6 percent corporations. The new facility seats 288 people for meals, the director pointed out.  “It contains a commercial grade kitchen,” she went on, “a day services area with bathroom, laundry, and shower facilities for clients, and it has additional space for job/life skills training, case management, and referral services.” In 2007, she said, 90,012 meals were served with an average of 300 people served dinner each day from 4-5 p.m. That’s five days a week but those figures are expected to increase when the CK goes seven days. The approximate $100,000 a year in food costs is not part of the budget, Talarico explained, however, the Kitchen receives donations in food from the South Jersey Food Bank, Philabundance, BJ’s Wholesale Club, and from the Olive Garden and Red Lobster restaurants, among others. The CK also plans to implement a culinary arts training program to teach entry-level job skills, to expand “Nutritious Nibbles,” a program that provides healthy snacks for children in Camden’s after-school programs, and to create a referral service for the homeless to other agencies and non-profits that service Camden County, among other additions. But, in the meantime — beginning Nov. 3 — dinner will be served. For more information about the Cathedral Kitchen, including how to donate and its volunteer program (some 1,000 people volunteer their time throughout the year), call the Kitchen at 856-964-6771.
Friday, 24 October 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Photo by James A. McBride  At left, Chef Jonathan Jernigan demonstrates how to cut a pineapple to students of the Cathedral Kitchen’s new Culinary Arts Program. CAMDEN — Cathedral Kitchen, a nonprofit organization that has been feeding the poor of Camden since 1976, kicked off its Culinary Arts Training (CAT) program on Feb. 2. The 14-week program will prepare Camden area individuals who are unemployed or underemployed for careers in the culinary field. The program includes culinary arts classroom instruction, kitchen skills classes and offers quantity food preparation experience as the students assist the chef and kitchen staff in preparing the Cathedral Kitchen’s daily meal. Additionally, CAT students will receive training in the areas of life skills and job search/readiness skills. During weeks 12 and 13 of the program, all students will participate in an offsite internship with either a local restaurant or other food service provider. The Cathedral Kitchen’s’s new chef instructor, Jonathan Jernigan, will teach the culinary arts classes, aided by guest chef instructors from numerous southern New Jersey, Philadelphia and New York restaurants and other food service establishments. Many organizations and individuals have partnered with CK in a variety of ways, including: — Campbell Soup, whose account chefs will offer classes in their areas of culinary expertise; — Rutgers School of Social Work, whose faculty members will offer instructional life skills; and — Cathedral Kitchen  board member/Food Network Chef “Big Daddy” Aaron McCargo, Jr. McCargo, a lifelong Camden resident, who will provide inspirational and hands-on cooking sessions for the  students. Program donors to date include: TD Bank, PNC Bank, Susquehanna Bank, Wachovia Bank, Ebay, and the Hummingbird Foundation. Camden County College was involved in early program development and will review the final program curriculum for block credits transferrable to the College for those interested in pursuing a degree in Food Service Management.
Friday, 06 February 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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PHILADELPHIA — On Saturday, April 12, a team from Camden’s Cathedral Kitchen joined with more than 200 supporters from the Campbell Soup Company for the Greater Philadelphia Coalition’s Walk Against Hunger. Campbell’s served as a corporate sponsor for this annual event, and Campbell employees donated the $21,000 they raised from their walk to the Cathedral Kitchen. Funds raised by the Walk will be used to purchase kitchen equipment for the new Cathedral Kitchen facility. The new Cathedral Kitchen facility, expected to open in the fall of this year, will include a commercial kitchen — a far cry from the kitchen with one electric stove and one convection oven it now uses to turn out an average of 380 meals a night. For information about the Cathedral Kitchen, contact executive director, Karen Talarico at 856-964-6771 or karentalarico@verizon.net, or visit the website at www.cathedralkitchen.org
Wednesday, 23 April 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
The Cathedral Kitchen will sponsor Harvest for Hunger, a wine tasting and auction on Friday, Nov. 2, 7-10 p.m., at the Collingswood Grand Ballroom. The honorary chair and auctioneer is Terry Ruggles of NBC10. More than 200 wines and microbrew beers will be available. The event will feature a live auction for wine, chefs’ tables and other prizes, including a trip to California wine country. The Cathedral Kitchen is located at 1514 Federal Street, Camden. The staff prepares meals fresh each day, using both purchased and donated food. Each night 15-18 volunteers come to help serve the meal. The organization also provides meals for off-site locations, including shelters, after-school programs, food pantries and smaller soup kitchens. Tickets for the Harvest for Hunger event are $65. For tickets and other information, go to the website: www.cathedralkitchen.org or contact Colleen Rini at 856-964-6771 or email colleen@cathedralkitchen.org
Thursday, 27 September 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Maria D'Antonio
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff  On Saturday April 25, special needs children, adults and their families came out to a free carnival on the parking lot of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Camden.  Over 300 enjoyed a sunny spring day with swings, slides, zoo animals and plenty of concessions. The event was sponsored by the Marlton Special Needs Karate Group, local businesses and the cathedral.  Johnson’s Fun Factory Amusements provided the entertainment, along with local donations from Camden businesses  
Thursday, 30 April 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Catherine M. Daiber (nee Brennan), 88, of Hilltop, and mother of Msgr. Sean Daiber, died Wednesday, Dec. 29. She was the wife of the late John A. She is survived by Msgr. Daiber, a priest of the Camden Diocese currently working in the missions in Goiania, Brazil; Teresa Baldauf and her husband Robert of Chews Landing; Mary Berkowsky and husband William of Jefferson, Ga.; Michael Daiber and wife Rhonda of Floyd, Va.; Margaret McManus and husband Gerald of Estero, Fla.; and Paul Daiber and wife Bernadette of Williamstown. She is also survived by grandchildren Kevin, Jerry, Collin, Joe, Christine and Travis; great-grandchildren Samantha, Matthew, Andrew, Madelyn, Maxwell, Megan, and John; brother John Brennan and wife Eileen; and brother-in-law William Egan. Mrs. Daiber was the owner of Cathy D.’s Ceramic Studio in Hilltop. A funeral Mass was celebrated on Tuesday, Jan. 4, at Our Lady of Hope Parish, St. Agnes Church, in Blackwood. Interment was at New St. Mary’s Cemetery, Bellmawr. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Catherine’s memory to the Alzheimer’s Association, 3 Eves Drive, Suite 310, Marlton, NJ 08053.
Thursday, 06 January 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
Cathleen Sheridan, a parishioner of St. Simon Stock Parish in Berlin was recently awarded the 'Chick' McGinty Award for Excellence in Catechetical Ministry by the Trenton Diocese. Sheridan recently retired as the director of religious education at St. Mary of the Lakes, Medford. Previously she was the principal of St. Luke School in Stratford. She is pictured with Michael Fabian, associate director of the Ministry of Catechesis and Evangelization, and Father Douglas Freer, vicar of education, Diocese of Trenton.
Thursday, 03 January 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
CAMDEN — For 10 years, Chris Haw has been a resident of Camden Houses, a community he founded in the Waterfront South area of the city near to Sacred Heart Church and School. The husband, father, carpenter, potter, teacher and author is dedicated to helping Camden, having experienced its highs — seeing people come together to revitalize the city and help its residents — and lows. Like hearing gunshots just outside his door. As he sees it, Camden is a city on the “intersection of entropy and rebirth.” Haw’s new book, “From Willow Creek to Sacred Heart: Rekindling My Love For Catholicism,” chronicles his journey from the suburbs of Chicago as a youth, to his time now in Camden. His previous book, co-authored with Shane Claiborne, was “Jesus for President,” published in 2008. Baptized Catholic, Haw left the church in his youth, joining Willow Creek Community Church, an evangelical community, and eventually involved in the New Monasticism movement, a Protestant movement modeled on a monastic way of life. After studying in Belize, protesting the war in Iraq and spending time in jail, Haw came to Camden and began “worshipping at Sacred Heart Catholic Church — first as a visitor, then as a friend, and finally as a committed Catholic,” he writes. Along the way, Haw studied theology and sociology at Eastern University, St. David’s, Pa., and earned a master’s degree in theology and religious studies from Villanova. “I was not argued into Catholicism; I first showed up to it as a Protestant partner and co-laborer in the fields of Camden,” he writes. “Along the way, through experience and study, I came to appreciate and even love it. This book is more of a self-criticism — a criticism of the ways my prejudices against Catholicism had blurred my vision — while showing how I risked a vulnerable openness to something I had previously written off.” Worshipping at Sacred Heart, he found the “Catholic liturgy, and the Church history compelling.” In the intentional community Haw currently lives in, he and his family — wife Cassie and son Simon — share groceries, transportation, and other resources with fellow members. “We see each other as brothers and sisters, supporting each other, with a hopeful attitude” toward Camden, he said. Since his arrival in Camden, Haw has been a teacher at Sacred Heart elementary school, and now performs contracting work in the area. He also teaches classes at Cabrini College, Radnor, Pa. When explaining his conversion to Protestantism, and reversion back to Catholicism, Haw writes that he sees “the Catholic Church as a body whose problems are painfully obvious on the surface, but with gold embedded underneath. Conversely, the Protestantism I knew was pristinely appealing on the surface, yet I found that problems emerged once I dug below.” Published by Ave Maria Press, Haw’s book can be found on his website, www.chris-haw.com It is also available through Amazon and Barnes & Noble.
Thursday, 25 October 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
At Cherry Hill's Woodcrest Country Club on the morning of Nov. 8, Deacon Gerard Jablonowski spoke to CEOs and owners of mom-and-pop businesses about blending the Catholic faith in daily business practices. "It is essential that if we are to call ourselves ‘Catholic' and be real disciples of Christ, we can't lead a divided life, where our faith practices do not converge with our business practices," he said. Deacon Jablonowski, from Church of the Holy Family in Sewell, is familiar with the mix of faith and business. Until last September, he served 10 years as CEO at St. Francis Medical Center in Trenton. He spoke at the monthly breakfast for the Catholic Business Network of Southern New Jersey, a networking group that brings together businesses and individual professionals to share experiences, foster business ethics, and create networking opportunities, all while striving to apply the Catholic faith in the daily marketplace. Almost 40 individuals heard Deacon Jablonowski's words, which emphasized the reflection of Catholic values in business, and making sure business decisions are consistent with Catholic teaching, promote the common good, and allow the organization and external community to view the decision as part of their Catholic identity. These Catholic values, he stated, "must be evident in how we deal with every player...customers, colleagues, community, and our competitors." Upcoming Friday morning breakfasts, and speakers, for the Catholic Business Network of Southern New Jersey, held from 7:30-9 a.m. at Woodcrest Country Club, are: - Dec. 13, Deacon Leo McBlain; - Jan. 10, Andy Cooney; and - Feb. 14, Father Stephen Rapposelli. For further information, contact Sheila McGirl, founding member, at sjcbn@comcast.net
Thursday, 21 November 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Carmela Malerba
The Catholic Business Network has hosted several networking breakfasts with each one continuing to grow and attract new business people throughout the Diocese of Camden. Leadership is forming and some fundraising activities will be planned to support Catholic Schools in the South Jersey community. The next Catholic Business Network breakfast will be held on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014 at the Woodcrest Country Club, 300 East Evesham Road, Cherry Hill. A networking meeting begins at 7:30 a.m., followed by breakfast and guest speaker: International recording star Andy Cooney will speak about "God, Faith and the Music Business" (http://www.andycooney.com). In addition, Cooney has been involved with many successful efforts to increase awareness and raise funds for Catholic Education. The meeting will end around 9 a.m. The cost of breakfast is $20. For more information, please email SJCBN@comcast.net
Thursday, 19 December 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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What is CCHD? The Catholic Campaign for Human Development was founded in 1970 by the Catholic bishops of the United States as the Catholic Church’s domestic anti-poverty program. For nearly 40 years, CCHD has helped make long-term changes in the economic condition of communities across the United States. What differentiates the Catholic Campaign for Human Development from other church charities programs? CCHD is a complement to the direct-assistance mission of Catholic Charities agencies and other Church emergency relief programs. It helps make long-term changes in the economic condition of communities by supporting projects that address the root causes of poverty, such as racism, unemployment, lack of education and lack of economic opportunities What kind of initiatives does CCHD fund? CCHD funds programs where poor and marginalized people are empowered to make decisions, seek solutions to local problems and find ways to improve their lives and neighborhoods. Economic development initiatives help poor and low-income people develop new businesses, create new jobs and develop assets that are owned by families and communities. CCHD also provides educational opportunities for Catholics to learn about poverty interact with those affected by it and reflect on a faith response to it. How do initiatives get funded? Those who seek funding submit their applications through their local dioceses. Diocesan staff evaluate the projects and submit to the local bishop for approval. A national team reviews all applications submitted and, in consultation with the dioceses that recommended them, makes recommendations to the Bishops’ Subcommittee on the Catholic Campaign for Human Development. The Subcommittee decides which ones will receive national funding. Additionally, some projects are funded directly by the diocese from the 25 percent retained by the local diocese for smaller initiatives that are just starting out. Does CCHD fund exclusively Catholic initiatives? No, but CCHD guidelines explicitly state that in order to apply for CCHD funding the mission and actions of agencies seeking funding cannot be at odds with Catholic social teaching. Why doesn’t CCHD fund exclusively Catholic programs or initiatives? CCHD is deeply integrated into the life of the Catholic community. For example, in 2008, CCHD funded initiatives involved 683 Catholic priests, 776 Catholic parishes, 18 Catholic Charities agencies and 51 religious communities. Some of the programs funded include partnerships with other communities of faith and secular groups. As long as the mission and actions of the groups requesting funding are in agreement with Catholic social teaching, the bishops believe Catholics can partner with others in the community to address the root causes of poverty and injustice, and advance the cause of human dignity and development. What about recent allegations that CCHD funds groups openly in conflict with positions held by the Catholic Church? CCHD is always examining ways to strengthen and improve monitoring efforts to ensure that all grantees comply with CCHD criteria. This is an ongoing process, involving both local dioceses and national CCHD staff. We also hear from others who may bring to our attention concerns about groups or initiatives that CCHD is either considering for funding or currently funding. The CCHD Subcommittee and staff take seriously any allegation that groups are not in compliance with Catholic teaching or are participating in partisan political activity. CCHD immediately investigates each allegation in consultation with the local diocese and, if the allegations are confirmed, discontinues funding immediately. Out of the 250 grantees for 2009, how many groups have been found non-compliant? Out of 250 grantees in 2009, there were three credible allegations. In one case, a group was found to be in support of abortion and had already been de-funded when an allegation brought their name to our attention. In the other two cases, the groups had taken actions in conflict with CCHD’s guidelines after they were funded. Without the knowledge of the local diocese or CCHD, they produced voter guides that took positions on referenda opposed to Catholic teaching on same-sex marriage and, in one case, on parental notification and abortion. As soon as these facts were confirmed, and after consultation with the local diocese, the groups were de-funded. Charges against two other groups named were investigated and, in consultation with the local dioceses, the charges were found to be inaccurate or based on a misunderstanding. In all five cases prompt and decisive action was taken consistent with CCHD’s policies and practices. In the past, funding also has been withdrawn promptly when allegations of political partisanship or mismanagement of funds were substantiated. Who is being funded by CCHD? A list of recent grantees and other information about CCHD is at www.usccb.org/cchd/grants. Persons seeking further information may call the Catholic Campaign for Human Development at 202-541-3210.
Thursday, 19 November 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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How God speaks to his people and how Jesus’ disciples listen and discern his voice was the focus of the annual New Jersey Catholic Charismatic Conference held June 13-15 in Union Catholic High School, Scotch Plains. More than 350 people from around the state enthusiastically praised the Lord and heard speakers examine, explain and exhort them to take up the challenge of the conference theme – “Can you HEAR me? Signed, Jesus” – in his call to love one another in every situation of life. The weekend included daily Liturgy of the Eucharist, workshop sessions, Eucharistic adoration, an evening healing service conducted by Father John Campoli, a priest of the Voluntas Dei Institute and director of His Love Ministries, an international intercessory prayer ministry, and a Life in the Spirit Seminar.
Thursday, 26 June 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Author:Admin2
In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden, Inc. is coordinating relief and recovery efforts throughout the Diocese, and particularly in Atlantic and Cape May Counties. If you would like to support Catholic Charities as it responds to the disaster, contributions can be sent to: Catholic Charities, Hurricane Sandy Fund, 1845 Haddon Avenue, Camden, New Jersey 08103.  All funds will be used for relief and recovery efforts in the Diocese.
Friday, 02 November 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report


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