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Sports/Sports News
Home football team the Camden Catholic Irish was handed its first loss this season, in Friday night’s game against the Shawnee Renegades. The 5-1 Irish were defeated 42-13. Left, Camden Catholic’s Jahseer Bronson breaks a tackle by Shawnee’s Ryan Wesley to score a touchdown. 
Thursday, 30 October 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Carmela Malerba
Guidance councelor Jack Phipps comes forward to be recognized for his 50 years of service to Camden Catholic High School, Cherry Hill, during an assembly to celebrate the school's 125th anniversary on June 10. At far right, students lead the students and faculty in a cheer. Founded in 1887, Camden Catholic is the oldest Catholic co-educational college preparatory school in South Jersey, and has more than 15,000 graduates.
Friday, 21 June 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Rich Luongo
CAMDEN — The second annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Community Organizing attracted more than 80 people on Jan. 17 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. to a workshop at St. Anthony of Padua Church, sponsored by Camden Churches Organized for People (CCOP). “There were many groups around the nation holding a day of service to commemorate Dr. King’s birthday,” said Father Jud Weiksnar, pastor of St. Anthony of Padua, “but we were the only place in the country to hold a day of Community Organizing.” Father Weiksnar said those in attendance included community organizers, college students, immigrants, students from St. Anthony School, parishioners, and clergy from all around Camden. Marion Jones, CCOP co-chairwoman, said the workshops looked at the man and what he did to get his ideas across and how he influenced people. According to Father Weiksnar, the main point of the day of community organizing was that “community service is a good thing, but if it is the first thing that we associate with Martin Luther King, then we are doing his legacy a grave disservice.” “Younger generations especially,” the pastor continued, “might think of King only in terms of getting a day off from school to volunteer at a soup kitchen, and never know of King’s message of radical nonviolence, and his challenging of unjust structures.”   Churches respond to layoffs On Dec. 4 CCOP held a press conference on the steps of the Immaculate Conception Cathedral asking the governor, Mayor Dana Redd, and the municipal unions to show leadership during the city’s financial crisis and to avoid the layoffs of the police and firefighters. At 1:30 p.m., near the end of the MLK workshop, a press conference was held on the steps of St. Anthony of Padua Church, mirroring one that was held on Dec. 4 in front of Immaculate Conception Church when the governor, Mayor Dana Redd, and the municipal unions were asked to show leadership during the city’s financial crisis to avoid the layoffs of the police and firefighters. Marion Jones said at the time that she wanted the governor “to sit down with the mayor and with the unions to discuss public safety and how it applies to the people of Camden. We cannot put Camden and its people in jeopardy.” But the layoffs went through and nearly half of the police department and more than 60 firefighters and some 100 non-uniform employees were laid-off to help plug a hole in the city budget. “We still need to talk to the mayor and the governor,” said Jones after the lay-offs were carried out. “Nobody seems to be thinking about us with this triangle of the union, administration, and the people. Are we, the people of Camden, expendable because we’re poor? It looks that way.” “Our position is that the people of Camden need to be assured of adequate public services and public safety,” Father Weiksnar said, “and that the city, state, and public employee unions have had plenty of time to come up with a plan that will protect the people of Camden, which is already the poorest and second most dangerous city in the nation. While Martin Luther King fought for our civil rights, Camden is still beset by civil wrongs.” Jones said she felt that if there is a plan to lay-off a good percentage of the public safety personnel in the city then what is the backup plan? “There’s supposed to be a plan,” she said. “What is it? If you cut police and fire you have to have a Plan B. Will there be other law enforcement agencies coming into the city?” Rosa Ramirez, a former chairwoman of the CCOP, said people pulled together to tell city and state officials that Camden was in a crisis. “Officials are going to have to come up with something to help this city,” she said. “We are scared. If you live and/or work in Camden you have a right to be scared. We don’t know what’s going on with our police and fire departments. We are the second most dangerous city in the country yet the moves our city officials are making don’t make sense. We have to come up with a plan. We haven’t given up yet because we need a plan. We have to find ways to improve our city. We need a plan to improve the city. There’s still hope for it.” Jones said a meeting must be held with the governor and the mayor to discuss other issues, besides public safety. She wants to know how funds can be generated for the city. “We were under state control at one time,” she said. “But we have nothing to show for it. You’d think things would be better for us if the state was running us at one time. And don’t forget those arrested in drug busts, for example, are not from the city. The majority of the poor in Camden are not from Camden.”
Thursday, 20 January 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
The Camden City Basketball League will have its season-ending tournament this Sunday, April 11, at Rutgers University-Camden gymnasium. Comprising 6-8 grade boys and girls from city schools (St. Anthony of Padua, Holy Name, Sacred Heart, and St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral), the league was started four years ago to give Catholic school students an opportunity to learn the values of sportsmanship, coming together in faith, and staying active. The league’s first year consisted of four girls’s teams; the following year, four boys’ teams joined. The four games on Sunday (two consolation, two championship) will cap off a season that started in December. Approximate game start times are 10:15 a.m., Girls’ Consolation (Holy Name vs. St. Anthony of Padua); 11:45 a.m., Boys’ Consolation (Holy Name II vs. St. Anthony of Padua); 1:15 p.m., Girls’ Championship (Sacred Heart vs. St. Joseph’s Pro-Cathedral); and 2:45 p.m., Boys’ Championship (Holy Name I vs. St. Joseph’s Pro-Cathedral). Free for the student athletes, the league has had to rely on donations from the Camden Diocese, L3 Communications, and the Camden Rotary Club and others to pay for such essentials as uniforms, and gym space. Parents, guardians, family members, friends, school staff and other supporters wishing to attend on Sunday are asked to bring a minimum $1 donation, to assist in paying for the children’s trophies. Call the league director Judyann Gillespie, at either 609-202-8470, or 215-901-6398 for more information.
Thursday, 08 April 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Rich Luongo
CAMDEN — The City Council approved the demolition of 23 abandoned homes last week that were considered “imminent hazards” and awarded the project to Hargrove Demolition of Cramer Hill. But no contract has been signed by either the company or the city and no date has been set for the actual demolition. Pat Keating, director of public works for the city, said the properties must be presented to the local historic preservation group for “due diligence” to investigate their historic significance. “Demolition of structures in the city must go through historic review,” said Franciscan Father Jud Weiksnar of Camden Churches Organized for People (CCOP). “Some 30 ‘imminent hazards’ were cited by the council but 23 were chosen for total demolition,” said Father Weiksnar, who is pastor of St. Anthony of Padua Parish in the Cramer Hill section of Camden. One of the 23 was the abandoned house at 923 N. 27th St. in Cramer Hill which received the title of the Ugliest House of 2009. Father Weiksnar said it was a haven for drug addicts until it recently caught fire. Another house at 713 N. 10th St. was featured at the CCOP citywide meeting with Gov. Jon Corzine in September. At the meeting neighborhood resident Shelly McCargo-Braxton said, “This property is so bad that our family does not feel comfortable cooking and eating in our own home for the bad odors, fleas, roaches and rodents coming from the trash-filled abandoned property.” “The governor said that this house broke his heart and that the state needed to pay attention to the details that will give Camden residents hope,” Father Weiksnar said, who noted that both these houses have become symbols of state and city neglect. “When we met with Gov.-elect Christie we were told that he wanted to get the city back to governing itself as quickly as possible,” Father Weiksnar added. “Taking care of the abandoned house problem was one way of doing that.”
Thursday, 03 December 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Bishop Dennis Sullivan has decided, after extensive consultation with the leadership of the affected parishes and with the diocesan Presbyteral Council, to approve the consolidation of two Camden County parishes with nearby parish communities. The Emmaus Catholic Community of Mount Ephraim will now be joined with St. Rose of Lima Parish, Haddon Heights. Mary Mother of the Church, now part of St. Rita's Parish, Bellmawr, will join with St. Joachim's Parish, also in Bellmawr. Those parishioners attending St. Francis Church, Barrington, now a part of St. Rita's, will become part of St. Rose of Lima Parish. The church buildings from the two parishes will become the responsibility of the new parish communities. St. Francis Church was originally a mission of St. Rose of Lima, as was Sacred Heart Church in Mount Ephraim, now part of the Emmaus Catholic Community. The consolidation was done to strengthen parish life and better serve the faithful in these communities. The decrees, effective June 30, can be found on the Camden Diocesan website, www.camdendiocese.org on May 9.
Thursday, 08 May 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Sports/Sports News
Author:Admin2
Photo by James A. McBride Left photo: Bob Companick attends the Camden County Sports Hall of Fame Dinner and Induction Ceremony, at Lucien’s Manor in Berlin Oct, 25 to accept the award for his sister, Sister Joan Companick. On Oct. 25, Camden County honored 12 local sports legends at the seventh annual Camden County Sports Hall of Fame Dinner and Induction Ceremony, at Lucien's Manor in Berlin. Seven of the 12 honorees have shared their athletic talents with schools in the Diocese of Camden. Bill Andracki was an exceptional soccer goalie at Paul VI High School in Haddon Township, where he graduated from in 1987. The following year, 1988, he played on the national championship team at Mercer County Community College, and in 1990 he was first team All-American at Rutgers University, playing on a team that finished second in the country. During his 21 years as a professional soccer player, he played for Major League Soccer, United Soccer Leagues, and the Major Indoor Soccer League. Finishing his career with the Rochester Rhinos, he helped them capture three championships. Matt Brady was a leader on Paul VI's boys basketball team, guiding them to the State Parochial A Championship in 1983. He followed this up with a college career that included becoming the all-time assists leader at Siena College, where he is in the Hall of Fame, and is now men's basketball head coach at James Madison University. Sister Joan Companick (posthumous) was instrumental in gaining recognition for women's sports. She served at St. John Parish in Collingswood, forming teams and developing CYO leagues in basketball and softball. She also was an official in hockey, basketball and softball at Camden Catholic High School in Cherry Hill. Mark Lonetto was a boys' basketball standout at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School in Pennsauken, as the leader of a team voted best of the century, and helped the Crusaders win three parochial state titles. He followed up his high school career with a successful basketball career at the University of Pennsylvania, and in 1989, he was inducted into the South Jersey basketball Hall of Fame. John McCarthy (posthumous), a former NFL punter, was a successful basketball coach at Camden Catholic, his alma mater, and Gloucester Catholic. His Camden Catholic team went undefeated and won the Camden City Series Championship in 1951. In 1983, he was inducted into the South Jersey Basketball Hall of Fame, and is in the Camden Catholic Hall of Fame, and Camden Catholic Basketball Hall of Fame. Gary Papa was head wrestling coach at Paul VI, and Camden Catholic. In 12 years at Paul VI, his teams won eight state, five conference, and four district titles. In 13 years at Camden Catholic, he led his teams to seven state, 12 conference, and 10 district championships. Bob Viggiano, a 1954 graduate of Camden Catholic, was a sportswriter for the Courier Post for nearly 50 years, starting in 1963. In 1996, he was inducted into the South Jersey Basketball Hall of Fame for his contributions to the sport.
Thursday, 08 November 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
SOMERDALE — With three months left before they depart to Sydney, Australia, for World Youth Day 2008, which will hold the largest gathering of young Catholics from all over the world, youths and young adults from the Camden Diocese and their leaders are finishing three crosses being built specifically for the global event, that will serve as witnesses to God, and show the worldwide contingent the devotion that the youth of the diocese have to the Lord. Five priests, one religious sister, 12 adults, five young adults, and 20 high-school age students — representing 19 parishes in the Diocese of Camden — will make the July 15-20 trip to Sydney being sponsored by the Office  of Youth and Young Adults. Another five people, from three neighboring dioceses, are also making the trip with the Camden group. The biggest of the three crosses going to Sydney is nine feet tall, created out of cedar wood. Frank Seder, a Deptford sculptor whose daughter, Alexandra, is going to World Youth Day, has had the cedar in his garage for 15 years and couldn’t think of a better time to put it to use. In November, he started work on the cross and will finish soon.
Monday, 24 March 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
The annual Camden Diocesan Charismatic Conference will take place at the Wildwood Convention Center from Friday, Oct. 11-Sunday, Oct. 13. This year's theme is "Every Act Should Be Done With Love" (1 Cor 16:14). This year's gathering represents a milestone: it will be the 25th anniversary conference. The charismatic movement received an unexpected boost this year from none other than Pope Francis. Speaking to reporters on his return from Rio on July 28, he said that "at the end of the 1970s and the beginning of the 1980s, I had no time for" charismatics. "Once speaking about them, I said: 'These people confuse a liturgical celebration with samba lessons!'" "Now I regret it," he said. "Now I think that this movement does much good for the church, overall." Though not even half a century old, the movement claims that at least 120 million Catholics in 238 countries have been "baptized in the Holy Spirit," according to a 2012 document published by International Catholic Charismatic Renewal Services. The movement, which started in the United States, reports fast growth in Asia and Africa. But the world's largest concentration of charismatics today is in Latin America. Like Pentecostalism, charismatic Catholicism emphasizes the Holy Spirit, features faith healing and speaking in tongues and is spread by door-to-door evangelists. But the important roles it gives to Mary and the Eucharist ensure that charismatic devotion has a clear Catholic identity. "I don't think that the charismatic renewal movement merely prevents people from passing over to Pentecostal denominations," Pope Francis said. "No! It is also a service to the church herself! It renews us." The master of ceremonies for the weekend in Wildwood will be Father Ariel Hernandez, pastor, Our Lady of the Most Blessed Sacrament, Newfield. Guest speakers include Father Pio Mandato, a Franciscan priest living as a missionary hermit in the Diocese of Scranton, Pa.; Father Yvans Jazon, pastor of St. Monica Church, Atlantic City; Sister Theresa May, founder of the Capuchin Sisters of Nazareth, in Tunkhannock, Pa.; and Kathleen McCarthy, host of In His Sign, a Catholic radio station broadcast out of Philadelphia. The youth tracks, coordinated and co-led by Sandy and Jim Scheiner, are designed to inspire the young church with musicians who perform modern praise and worship songs. CatholicFX will bring the message of Christ to the senior high youth. A ministry of young adults, the band plays a blend of upbeat, high-energy rock music with quiet, contemplative songs. Working with the junior high youth will be the band Paging Samuel, based in Southeastern Pennsylvania, but with strong ties to South Jersey. The Junior High track will include music, skits and activities to help youth live their faith in new, exciting, and meaningful ways. Conference registration for both youth and adult tracks is $40 at the door, which includes admission to the three-day conference only, and does not cover food or housing. For more information, call 609-522-5010, or e-mail support@camdencharistmatic.org.
Thursday, 26 September 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Each year, the Church throughout the world prepares for the celebration of Easter by entering into a forty-day period of reflection and renewal centered on the spiritual works of prayer, fasting and almsgiving. Marked with the “Sign of the Cross” in ashes, we begin this “pilgrimage” with the reminder to “repent and believe” for “we are dust and unto dust we shall return.” By works of penance and charity, we set our hearts on the heavenly kingdom and strive to deepen our faith by loving God and our neighbor. This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. From Bishop Galante's letter to pastors: Pope Benedict reminded us in 2008: “Each year, Lent offers us a providential opportunity to deepen the meaning and value of our Christian lives, and it stimulates us to rediscover the mercy of God so that we, in turn, become more merciful toward our brothers and sisters. In the Lenten period, the Church makes it her duty to propose some specific tasks that accompany the faithful concretely in this process of interior renewal: these are prayer, fasting and almsgiving.” For Lent 2011, I would like to propose a program for the Diocese of Camden. Parish renewal has been a priority of our diocese. As part of that ongoing effort, I would like to encourage you to participate in our upcoming diocesan Lenten practice “These Forty Days: A Diocesan Pilgrimage”. In that spirit, the purpose of “These Forty Days: A Diocesan Pilgrimage” is to foster a more cohesive diocesan identity among parishes, especially given the recent restructuring, while at the same time cooperating to provide a variety of spiritual exercises in this season of prayer, fasting and almsgiving that lead to a renewal of faith. May this Lenten season spark ongoing renewal in our parishes and in the Catholic people of South Jersey. Week One Wednesday, March 9 (Ash Wednesday) Cathedral Parish of the Immaculate Conception, Camden www.cathedralcamden.org Mass at 7:55 a.m. Bishop celebrates Mass at 12:05 p.m. (Ashes will be distributed at each Mass) All Parishes Please consult your parish bulletin and/or websites for a full schedule of Masses and services with the distribution of ashes. Thursday, March 10 Holy Angels Parish, Woodbury www.holyangelsnj.org Mass at 6:45 a.m. (St. Patrick); 7:00 a.m. (St. Matthew); 9:00 a.m. (St. Patrick) “Sermon on the Mount” performed by Frank Runyeon 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Holy Angels Parish Worship Center + or + St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Mays Landing www.vincentdepaul.org Mass at 7:00 a.m. Part One of Weekly Reflections Series “Our Father” 7:00 p.m. (Church) (This series continues each Thursday evening through April 7) Friday, March 11 Saints Peter and Paul Parish, Turnersville www.peterandpaulchurch.org Mass at 9:00 a.m. Stations of the Cross at 7:00 p.m. Christ the King Parish, Haddonfield www.christ-the-king-parish.org Mass at 8:00 a.m. and noon Lenten Series “Walk with Jesus” (continues for five weeks) Soup at 6:15 p.m. (reservations requested); Evening Prayer at 7:15 p.m.; Reflection at 7:30 p.m. All Parishes of the Diocese Please check your local parish bulletin and/or website for a full schedule of Lenten services and Stations of the Cross. Please note that participation in a parish Lenten supper requires the courtesy of pre-registering so that proper preparations may be made. Saturday, March 12 Saint Monica Parish, Atlantic City www.saintmonicaofac.com Charismatic Prayer Day Please contact Saint Monica Parish directly for information. 609-345-1786
Thursday, 03 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, March 13 (First Sunday of Lent) St. Rita of Cascia Parish, Bellmawr www.theparishofsaintrita.org Redemptorist Parish Mission at 7 p.m. in the church (Continues each night at 7 p.m. through Thursday, March 17) Catholic Community of the Holy Spirit, Mullica Hill/Woodstown www.holyspiritweb.org Parish Mission at 7:30 p.m. each night through Wednesday, March 16 Sunday, March 13 at Woodstown; Monday, March 14 at Mullica Hill; Tuesday, March 15 (with Penance Service) at Woodstown; and Wednesday, March 16 (with Mass) at Mullica Hill Monday, March 14 St. Katharine Drexel Parish, Egg Harbor Township Weekly Parish Mission at 7 p.m. “Give Us Living Water” (Continues at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 21 and Monday, March 28) St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Camden www.stanthonycamden.org 8:30 a.m. Mass; 7-9 p.m. Adoration and Confessions (English and Spanish) St. Mary Parish, Cherry Hill www.stmarycherryhill.org 8 a.m. Mass (chapel); 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Adoration (church); 7 p.m. Benediction; 7:30 p.m. Evening of Reflection for Women presented by Sr. Marcy Springer, SSJ titled “Jesus’ Call to Women As His Disciples” (chapel) Incarnation Parish, Mantua www.incarnation-church.org Mass at 9 a.m. 5:30-7 p.m. Soup & Scriptures (on all Mondays of Lent – please contact the parish to participate) Tuesday, March 15 St. Peter Parish, Merchantville www.stpeterrcc.com 6:45 a.m. Mass (church); 9 a.m. Mass (church); Benediction 7 p.m. (church); Evening Prayer 7 p.m. (church); Confessions 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. (church); Prayer at the Cross at 7 p.m. (church and hall) Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org Mass at 9 a.m. Forty Hours Devotion begins at noon and continues until 9 a.m. on Thursday, March 17 St. Monica Parish, Atlantic City www.saintmonicaofac.com Creole Mass and Stations Please contact St. Monica Parish for additional information: 609-345-1786 Wednesday, March 16 Our Lady of Hope Parish, Blackwood www.ourladyofhopenj.org 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. Mass in chapel; 7 p.m. Evening of Reflection with Exposition, Adoration, Scripture, Song Christ Our Light Parish, Cherry Hill www.christourlight.net 7:30 p.m. (Resurrection School Cafeteria) Dealing with Loss and Disappointment presented by Fr. Kevin Anderson Our Lady of Lourdes/Queen of Peace, Glassboro and Pitman www.churchofourladyoflourdes.org 7-9 p.m. Lenten Divine Mercy Mission at Our Lady of Lourdes Church Thursday, March 17 St. Simon Stock Parish, Berlin and Pine Hill www.stsimonstock.net 8 a.m. Mass at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel 7 p.m. “Extraordinary Women of the Bible Series” in Parish Meeting Room – Our Lady of Mt. Carmel site St. Bridget - University Parish, Glassboro www.churchofstbridget.com 8 a.m. Mass 6 p.m. Lenten Mass and Soup Dinner (Continues on Thursdays through April 14 – please call ahead) Friday, March 18 Incarnation Parish, Mantua www.incarnation-church.org Mass at 9 a.m. Franciscan Mystery Players at 7 p.m. in the church Divine Mercy Parish, Vineland http://home.catholicweb.com/DivineMercyParish Morning Prayer at 7 a.m.; Masses at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Stations of the Cross in English at 7 p.m.; Stations of the Cross in Spanish at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 19 (Solemnity of St. Joseph) St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral Parish, Camden www.stjosephprocathedral.org 8:30 a.m. Mass Please contact the parish for other scheduled activities on this, its feast day Holy Trinity Parish, Margate www.trinitymargate.org Mass at 8 a.m. in St. James Church, Ventnor At 9:30 a.m., a three-mile procession commemorating the Stations of the Cross (in English, Polish and Spanish) will be made visiting the three downbeach churches beginning at St. James, Ventnor then proceeding via the beach to Blessed Sacrament, Margate and on to Epiphany, Longport. Transportation will be provided by the Knights of Columbus for those in need. Please park in Longport, carpools will be available to Ventnor. Our Lady of Lourdes/Queen of Peace, Glassboro and Pitman www.churchofourladyoflourdes.org 1:30-4:30 p.m. “God…A Woman…and the Way” A Reflection of the Seven Sorrows of Mary at Our Lady of Lourdes Church Confessions at 4 p.m. and Sunday Vigil Mass at 5 p.m. Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org 6 p.m. Messa Italiana (Italian Mass) in Honor of St. Joseph 7 p.m. Festa Italiana in the Aquin Center
Thursday, 10 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, March 20 (Second Sunday of Lent)   St. Anthony of Padua, Camden www.stanthonycamden.org 8 a.m. Mass (English); 9:30 a.m. Mass (Spanish); and 12:10 p.m. Mass (English); 6 to 8 p.m. Charismatic Prayer and Music Meeting, “Walking With Jesus” in the church basement St. Andrew the Apostle, Gibbsboro www.standrewsrc.com Parish Mission: “The Presence of God” conducted by Msgr. Louis Marucci 7 p.m. in the church (continues through Tuesday) Monday, March 21 St. John Neumann Parish, North Cape May Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament at St. Raymond’s Church, Villas 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. St. Peter Parish, Merchantville www.stpeterrcc.org Parish Mission 7 p.m. in the church (continues through Thursday) St. Katharine Drexel Parish, Egg Harbor Township Weekly Parish Mission at 7 p.m. “Give Us Living Water” Tuesday, March 22 St. Mary Parish, Cherry Hill www.stmarycherryhill.org Evening of Reflection for Men: “The King's Men” presented by Msgr. Michael Mannion, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 23 Christ Our Light Parish, Cherry Hill www.christourlight.net 8 a.m. Mass; 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament; 9 to 10:30 a.m. “Your Sorrow Is My Sorrow” presented by Sr. Peggy Devlin, OP; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Holy Hour in church; 1 p.m. Benediction; 7:30 p.m. Male Spirituality Prayer Group in the Parish Ministry Center Thursday, March 24 St. Rose of Lima Parish, Haddon Heights www.strosenj.com Masses at 6:30 a.m. (chapel); 8:30 a.m. (chapel); and 7:30 p.m. (church) Morning Prayer 8 a.m. (chapel) Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. (church) Confessions 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. (chapel) Benediction 7 p.m. (church) St. Mary of Mt. Carmel Parish, Hammonton www.stmarymtcarmelhammonton.parishesonline.com Masses at 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. at St. Joseph Church Healing Prayer Service 7 p.m. at St. Anthony Church Friday, March 25 (Solemnity of the Annunciation) St. Charles Borromeo Parish, Washington Township www.saint-charles-borromeo.org Mass 9 AM Franciscan Mystery Players 7:30 PM in the church St. Rita of Cascia Parish, Bellmawr www.theparishofsaintrita.org Franciscan Mystery Players 7:30 PM in the church Saturday, March 26 Holy Child Parish, Runnemede www.holychildparish.net Morning Mass 8:30 a.m. at St. Teresa Church Vigil Mass 4 p.m. at St. Maria Goretti Church Vigil Mass 4:15 p.m. at St. Teresa Church Or visit your local parish
Thursday, 17 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, March 27 (Third Sunday of Lent) St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill www.stthomasmorenj.org Parish Mission with Fr. Dennis O’Donnell 7:30 p.m. in church (continues on Monday and Tuesday) Monday, March 28 St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill www.stthomasmorenj.org 9 a.m. Mass and conference, “Putting on the Attitude of Christ - Part I”; 10 a.m. confessions; 1 to 4:30 p.m. quiet prayer with time for individual interviews for spiritual growth; 7:30 p.m. conference, “Putting on the Attitude of Christ - Part II” St. Mary Parish, Cherry Hill www.stmarycherryhill.org 7:30 p.m. (chapel) presentation about Sacrament of Penance titled “The Healing Mercy of God” St. Aloysius Parish, Oaklyn www.staloysiusnj.org 6:40 p.m. Rosary; 7 p.m. Mass; 7:30 p.m. Miraculous Medal Novena St. Katharine Drexel Parish, Egg Harbor Township 7 p.m. Parish Mission, “Give Us Living Water” Tuesday, March 29 St. Joseph Parish, Somers Point www.stjosephsomerspoint.com 7:50 a.m. Rosary; 8:15 a.m. Morning Prayer; 8:30 a.m. Mass; 9 a.m. Adoration throughout day, concluding with Benediction at 7 p.m.; 7 p.m. evening of music, prayer and reflection titled “Change Our Hearts” presented by Carl Granieri and Hearts Afire St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill www.stthomasmorenj.org Parish Mission with Fr. Dennis O’Donnell 7:30 p.m. in church Wednesday, March 30 Notre Dame de la Mer, Wildwood www.notredamedelamer.org 7 a.m. Mass at St. Ann Church; 8:30 a.m. Mass at Assumption Church Soup-er Speaker from 5 to 7 p.m. St. Charles Borromeo Parish, Washington Township www.saint-charles-borromeo.org 9 a.m. Mass; 6:30 p.m. Simple Supper and Part I of “Passion of the Christ” Thursday, March 31 Holy Eucharist Parish, Cherry Hill www.stpiusx.net 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. Masses; 7 p.m. Lenten meditation, “God's Invitation: Come Back to Me” presented by Sr. Beth Butler, MSBT of the Mother Boniface Spirituality Center Christ Our Light Parish, Cherry Hill www.christourlight.net 8 a.m. Mass; 7:30 p.m. “Prayer Around the Cross” in church Friday, April 1 St. Gianna Beretta Molla, Northfield www.stgiannanorthfieldnj.org 8:30 a.m. Mass followed by Stations of the Cross; 6:30 p.m. Via Crucis in Spanish followed by 7 p.m. Mass in Spanish Our Lady Star of the Sea, Atlantic City www.olssparish.com 5:15 p.m. Mass; 5:45 p.m. Stations of the Cross; 6 p.m. Adoration with Scripture Reflection; 7 p.m. Benediction St. Peter Parish, Merchantville www.stpeterrcc.org 6:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. Masses; 6 p.m. Soup, Stations and Solidarity - Enjoy Father Anthony’s pasta fagioli followed by Stations of the Cross in church at 7 p.m.
Thursday, 24 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, April 3 (Fourth Sunday of Lent) Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org 7:30 p.m. (church) Parish Mission with Fr. Michael Sullivan, OSA (continues through Wednesday; Penance Service on Monday) St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Absecon www.stelizabethannseton.com 12:30 p.m. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament; 1 p.m. Stations of the Cross through the Eyes of Mary; 1:45 p.m. Reflection by Deacon Joseph Becker; 2:30 p.m. Miraculous Medal Novena and Reflection by Father Michael Speziale; 3:45 p.m. Evening Prayer and Benediction; 6:45 p.m. “The Passion, Death and Glory of Jesus Christ through Scripture and Song” presented by “Suite Inspiration” Monday, April 4 St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Absecon www.stelizabethannseton.com 8 a.m. Morning Prayer; 9 a.m. Showing of “The Passion of the Christ” followed by group discussion; 2 p.m. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament; 4 p.m Evening Prayer and Benediction; 6 to 6:45 p.m. Confessions; 7 p.m. Healing Mass with Father Perry Cherubini presiding and Fr. Cosme de la Pena preaching St. Mary Parish, Cherry Hill www.stmarycherryhill.org 7:30 p.m. (chapel) “The Changing and Changeless Mass,” a presentation on the Liturgy Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org 7:30 p.m. (church) Parish Mission with Fr. Michael Sullivan, OSA, Penance Service with opportunity for individual confessions Tuesday, April 5 Mary, Queen of All Saints Parish, Pennsauken www.stceciliapennsauken.org 8 a.m. Mass; 7 p.m. “Called to Serve” presented by Rev. Rico Ducle, CM St. Thomas More Parish, Cherry Hill www.stthomasmorenj.org 7:30 p.m. (church) Living Stations of the Cross Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org 7:30 p.m. (church) Parish Mission with Fr. Michael Sullivan, OSA Wednesday, April 6 St. Brendan the Navigator Parish, Avalon and Stone Harbor www.stbrendanthenavigatorparish.org 7:45 a.m. Rosary and 8 a.m. Mass at St. Paul (Stone Harbor) St. Charles Borromeo Parish, Washington Township www.saint-charles-borromeo.org 9 a.m. Mass; 6:30 p.m. Simple Supper and Part II of the “Passion of the Christ” Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org 7:30 p.m. (church) Parish Mission with Fr. Michael Sullivan, OSA Thursday, April 7 St. Isidore the Farmer Parish, Vineland www.stisidorefarmer.org 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. (chapel) Mass; Adoration throughout the day and night concluding at 6:45 a.m. Friday Friday, April 8 St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Camden www.stanthonycamden.org 7:45 p.m. (church) Franciscan Mystery Players Catholic Community of the Holy Spirit, Mullica Hill and Woodstown www.holyspiritweb.org 8 p.m. (Mullica Hill) Franciscan Mystery Players, “Jesus the Healer” Please make a visit to your home parish or a virtual visit to www.vatican.va
Thursday, 31 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, April 10 (Fifth Sunday of Lent) Infant Jesus Parish, Woodbury Heights www.theinfantjesusparish.org 7 p.m. Lenten Journey with Suite Inspirations, a Catholic musical group, taking listeners through the awe-inspiring final days of Jesus’ earthly life to the glory of Easter though Scripture and song. A free-will offering will be accepted for Good Counsel Homes of South Jersey for homeless, pregnant mothers and their children. Monday, April 11 Holy Eucharist Parish, Cherry Hill www.holyeucharistcherryhill.org 7:30 p.m. regional penance service with individual confessions Tuesday, April 12 St. Peter Parish, Merchantville www.stpeterrcc.com 1:30 p.m. Stations of the Cross and Benediction Wednesday, April 13 Our Lady Star of the Sea Parish, Cape May www.ladystarofthesea.org 11 a.m. Mass; 11:30 a.m. confessions; noon to 1:30 p.m. luncheon of soup and bread in hall with donations made to Operation Rice Bowl; 1:30 to 4 p.m. Reflection on Nature prayer walk on promenade, beach and Cape May Point Park; 4 to 5 p.m. faith sharing and vespers; 7 to 8 p.m. communal penance service St. Monica Parish, Atlantic City 6:30 p.m. parish mission (continues through Friday, April 15 with penance service on Thursday, April 14 and Mass and Benediction on Friday, April 15) Thursday, April 14 St. Monica Parish, Atlantic City 6:30 p.m. parish mission and penance service with individual confessions St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Mays Landing www.vincentdepaul.org 7 p.m. weekly reflection on the Lord’s Prayer, “...and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil,” speaker: Andres Arango, “Dealing with distractions in prayer and what distractions reveal to us about our attachments to things of this world.” Friday, April 15 St. Monica Parish, Atlantic City 6:30 p.m. parish mission with Mass and Benediction Resurrection Parish, Marmora www.thechurchoftheresurrection.org 7 p.m. choir-sung Stations of the Cross St. Bridget - University Parish, Glassboro www.churchofstbridget.com 7 p.m. bilingual Lenten reconciliation service Saturday, April 16 All Saints Parish, Millville www.theparishofallsaints.org 8 a.m. Mass; 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. confessions and silent adoration; 9:30 a.m. coffee and donuts; 10 a.m. silent adoration and palm braiding; 1 a.m. to noon Scripture study class on Matthew’s Passion; noon lunch; 1 to 2 p.m. Scripture study class on Resurrection Narratives; 2 to 3 p.m. palm braiding and silent adoration; 3 p.m. rosary; 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. silent adoration and confessions; 4:30 p.m. Passion Sunday Mass with Benediction St. Josephine Bakhita Parish, Camden www.stjosephinebakhita-camden.org 6:30 p.m. Concert for Haiti at St. Joan of Arc Church, 3107 Alabama Road, Camden, donation: $5 per person
Thursday, 07 April 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
This year the parishes of the Camden Diocese invite you to make your Lenten journey a true pilgrimage by participating in the many Masses and spiritual exercises being offered. On each day of Lent parishes are designated as “stations” of prayer. The parishes extend an invitation to the faithful throughout the diocese to make a visit and participate in scheduled activities. Your participation may take several forms: actual (physically visit the parish), virtual (visit the parish’s website), and/or spiritual (pray for the priests and parishioners of a given parish). No matter how you participate, the hope is that by uniting in prayer and works of charity Catholics in South Jersey will be renewed in spirit and become more faithful disciples of the Lord Jesus. Sunday, April 17 (Passion Sunday) Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra www.jdco.org Jubilate Deo Chorale and Orchestra present “O Divine Redeemer” 3 p.m. – Paul VI High School Auditorium, Haddon Township Holy Family Parish, Sewell www.churchoftheholyfamily.org 7:45 p.m. – Franciscan Mystery Players present the “Way of the Cross” Monday of Holy Week, April 18 Our Lady of Sorrows Parish, Linwood www.ourladyofsorrows.us 7 p.m. – regional penance service with individual confessions St. Bridget – University Parish, Glassboro www.churchofstbridget.com 7 p.m. – Tenebrae Service Tuesday of Holy Week, April 19 Diocese of Camden www.camdendiocese.org 3 p.m. – Most Reverend Joseph A. Galante, bishop of Camden, will celebrate the Chrism Mass at Our Lady of Hope, Blackwood Wednesday of Holy Week, April 20 St. Rita of Cascia Parish, Bellmawr www.theparishofsaintrita.org 7 p.m. – penance service with individual confessions Holy Thursday, April 21 Mass of the Lord’s Supper at your local parish Good Friday, April 22 Celebration of the Lord’s Passion at your local parish Holy Saturday, April 23 Easter Vigil at your local parish Thank you to all of the parishes that participated in this inaugural Diocesan Lenten Pilgrimage. A Blessed Easter!
Thursday, 14 April 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
The Diocese of Camden collected $259,798.38 for recovery efforts in the Philippines, following the devastation caused by Typhoon Haiyan. The typhoon swept in from the sea with 195-mile-an-hour winds and a tsunami-like storm surge on Nov. 8, 2013. As of Jan. 29, more than 6,200 people had died and more than 28,600 were injured in the storm while nearly 1,800 remained missing, according to the Philippines' National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. More than 4 million people were displaced by the storm. Damage was set at $877 million by the council. Two tropical storms swamped parts of the same regions in January, forcing some who lost their homes in November and were living in tents to flee to higher ground again. When the typhoon hit, Bishop Dennis Sullivan called for a special collection in all parishes of the diocese to collect funds for recovery efforts. Donations will "support the humanitarian efforts of Catholic Relief Services and for the rebuilding of the infrastructure of the parishes, schools, catechetical centers, clinics, etc. in the dioceses impacted by the storm," the bishop wrote in a letter to pastors at the time.
Thursday, 27 February 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Following are remarks given by Sister of St. Joseph  Roseann Quinn, Bishop’s Delegate for Lifelong Formation, before Bishop Galante and representatives of Georgian Court University and the College of St. Elizabeth signed agreements for the Camden Diocese’s Lay Ministry Formation Program: Welcome to the great initiative about to be undertaken by the Diocese of Camden, Georgian Court University and The College of St. Elizabeth! We bring together today representatives from both campuses for a Signing Ceremony held on the campus of the Diocese in downtown Camden, asigning long-awaited and whole-heartedly welcomed by all! Yesterday and today mark many reasons for great celebration and rejoicing,  here in the Diocese of Camden and its parishes, as well at Georgian Court University and the College of St. Elizabeth. Two renowned institutions of higher learning are coming to South Jersey! A University and a College, as well as other Centers for Ministry Formation, are coming to South Jersey to provide both graduate and undergraduate education and formation programs for ministry of every sort!
Thursday, 16 October 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
On March 31, a signing ceremony will take place in the Camden Diocesan Center to formalize the partnership between the Diocese of Camden’s Office of Lifelong Faith Formation and the Villanova School of Business in providing a church management degree program for parish leaders and managers. The 30-credit master of science degree in church management, part of the diocese’s Lay Ministry Formation Program, will teach business skills and professional ethics to pastors, parish business managers, diocesan department heads, and those managing church-related social service ministries. Bishop Joseph A. Galante of Camden called the upcoming partnership “a very exciting time for us in the Diocese of Camden as we form the partnership with Villanova University. This master’s degree in church administration will be of inestimable benefit to laity and clergy as they serve our parishes and institutions.” Calling the program a “faith-focused business curriculum,” Charles Zech, director of the Center for the Study of Church Management at the Villanova School of Business, noted that the program is “uniquely positioned to provide the very best in faith-based managerial education, enabling church leaders to apply sound business approaches” to pastoral issues and decision making. Courses include “Civil Law and Church Law for Church Administrators,” “Stewardship and Development,” “Human Resource Management in a Ministry Setting,” and “Pastoral Strategic Planning.” Applications are being accepted for the May cohort. All courses are offered online and can be completed in two years of part-time study. The only travel requirement is a one-week residency at the Villanova School of Business, which is part of Villanova University in Pennsylvania. Candidates accepted into the program pay one-third of the discounted tuition cost; parishes and the diocese pay the remaining cost of tuition. The upcoming partnership with the Villanova School of Business is the lastest addition to the offerings of the diocese’s Lay Ministry Formation Program. Lay Ministry Formation has partnered with numerous institutions of higher learning to offer college and university certificate and degree courses in 15 areas for parish leaders and staff members who serve in various pastoral ministries. For more information about this program and other Lay Ministry Formation programs, call Linda K. Robinson at 856-583-6116, or go to www.camdendiocese.org and click on “Lay Ministry Formation Program.”
Thursday, 17 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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CAMDEN — An independent audit has found the Diocese of Camden to be in full compliance with the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, which was adopted by the U.S.bishops in June 2002. The audit of the Diocese of Camden was conducted Aug. 6-10, 2007 by the Gavin Group, Inc. of Boston, an independent firm of experienced compliance auditors, many of whom are former FBI agents and law enforcement officers. The Gavin Group was retained by the U.S. bishops’ Office of Child and Youth Protection to measure the progress made by each diocese to implement the Charter. The Diocese of Camden was found to be compliant in three previous audits, which were conducted in 2003, 2004 and 2005. No audit was conducted in 2006. The 2007 audit covered the period of Aug. 22, 2005 through June 30, 2007 and reviewed the diocese’s outreach to victims, including pastoral care and victim assistance; its programs of prevention, including safe-environment programs and criminal history background checks; the reporting of allegations by the diocese to civil authorities; its long-standing cooperation with law enforcement; its safe-environment and prevention programs; and its open, active communication with parishioners and the public.
Thursday, 13 March 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
Photos of the Week /Photos of the Week
Author:Carmela Malerba
Pictured are Jack Smith (alt.), Jack Walter, Liam Duffy, Jake Dawkins, Chris Smith and Breandan Rosolia (alt.). Kneeling (left to right): Julia Mayo, Juliana May, Myranda Christy, Carly Murphy and Madison Brown (alt.) The Camden Diocese Penn Relays Boys and Girls 4x100 meters races were held on April 29 at Franklin Field in Philadelphia. The results are as follows: Boys 1. St. Rose (Haddon Heights). Time: 51.50. Chris Smith, Jake Dawkins, Liam Duffy, Jack Walter 2. St. Mary (Williamstown). Time: 52.65. Tyler Kells, Will Barclay, Nick Schleider, Paul Uffen. 3. St. Peter (Merchantville). Time: 53.26. Nicholas Ricci, Adam Girodano, Kristofer Noone, Isaiah Fisher. 4. St. Michael (Clayton). Time: 54.07. Billy Asterino, Matt Slowinski, Anthony Novak, Stefone Moore-Green. 5. St. Mary (Gloucester). Time: 54.15. Shane Kenney, Nick Arey, Chris Kain, Tyler Berglund. 6. Our Lady of Mt Carmel (Berlin). Time: 54.55. Tyler Tartaglia, Tim Caruso, Christian Narciso, Jonathan Linden. 7. Our Lady of Hope (Blackwood). Time: 57.03. John Rooney, Antonio Tarantino, Jack Vacca, Brian Bologitz. 8. Guardian Angels (Paulsboro). Time: 61.18. Tyler Barnett, Andrew Sammartino, Bryce Prozillo, Nick Hallam. Girls 1. St. Rose (Haddon Heights). Time: 55.43. Julia Mayo, Juliana May, Myranda Christy, Carly Murphy. 2. Guardian Angels (Paulsboro). Time: 56.64. Veronica Tortella, Ashley Clerval, Cheyenne Zubec, Morgan Gilcrest. 3. St. Peter (Merchantville). Tme: 56.72. Brianna Zimmerman, Meghan Giordano, Mackenzie O'Drain, Megan Kilpatrick. 4. Good Shepherd (Collingswood). Time: 56.94. Kaylin Blacks, Morgan McConnell, Gina Gabris, Victoria Duva. 5. Our Lady of Mt Carmel (Berlin). Time: 58.97. Barbara Caruso, Daemani Frazier, Julia Klekotka, Krista Nichols. 6. St. Michael (Clayton). Time: 59.36 Juliana Valeno, Jackie Kukon, Caitlynn Marcano, Danielle Baxter. 7. St. Mary (Williamstown). Time: 60.39. Lauren Feldman, MaryKate Crowley, Natalie DiGiacomo, Francesca Vecchio. 8. Bethel Prep (Sewell). Time: 60.48. Bella Villari, Kumbah Givens, Christina Rodriguez, Carissa Court.
Thursday, 19 May 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
The Diocese of Camden is receiving financial help from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops for damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy, which quickly became a super storm, wreaked havoc on the Eastern United States in October 2012, killing 125 people in the U.S. after causing more than 70 deaths in the Caribbean. According to a report from The Associated Press, the storm caused about $62 billion in damage and other losses in the U.S. making it the second-costliest storm in U.S. history after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 which caused $128 billion in damage. Damage in South Jersey was significant but minor compared to North Jersey and New York. The collective property damage losses in the Diocese of Camden are valued at roughly $1,635,000. Insurance-related property claims reported for 57 of the 65 buildings damaged range from $500 to $303,000. Other than a few random wind-related claims, Sandy's damages to buildings in the Diocese of Camden territory were caused by water. The most severe losses were at the diocese's shore points, which resulted from tidal surge. The highest concentration of losses were at St. Joseph's in Sea Isle City; St. Monica, Our Lady Star of the Sea, St. Michael and St. Nicholas of Tolentine in Atlantic City; and Holy Trinity Parish at its Ventnor, Margate and Longport locations. Although the diocese sustained $1,635,000 in claimed damages, the diocese is expected to be reimbursed at $816,182 by its excess insurance carrier, leaving a non-insured exposure of $817,318, which church officials described as a "substantial and significant financial burden on the diocese." Recognizing our financial burden and those of other dioceses along Sandy's path of destruction, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), Subcommittee on Catholic Home Missions under the leadership of Bishop Peter F. Christensen of Superior, Wis, offered grants to those dioceses most affected. Accordingly, the USCCB provided the Diocese of Camden a grant of $375,000 which reduced the financial non-insured burden by approximately 50 percent.
Thursday, 27 February 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Rich Luongo
Photo by James A. McBride Fran Montgomery, principal of St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School, East Camden, holds the Principal of the Year award. Also pictured are, from left, Sister Karen Dietrich, executive director, Catholic Partnership Schools; Mary Boyle, superintendent of Schools; and Msgr. Robert T. McDermott. CAMDEN — Fran Montgomery was chosen as Elementary School Principal of the Year by the Office of Catholic Schools, Diocese of Camden. Principal of St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School for the past six years, she received the honor at an awards ceremony held at St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral, East Camden, on Tuesday, April 3. “It is a great honor and privilege to be at St. Joseph’s and to work in Camden,” Montgomery said. “I wouldn’t be able to do my job without the help of a fantastic staff. It’s great to get up each morning to go to work. And I have the great support of our pastor, Msgr. Robert T McDermott, and many, many others at the school.” Montgomery was graduated from college in 1973 but stayed home to raise her children. She has five children and four grandchildren. In 1982 she began teaching pre-school while still raising her children. In 1990 she went to St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School where she taught the first grade and computers, later teaching the second grade, and finally becoming principal in 2006. “My specialty has always been reading,” Montgomery said. “I’m certified to teach kindergarten through the eighth grade and certified for pre-school through the second grade. I also have a master’s in education leadership.” School superintendent Mary Boyle said the Office of Catholic Schools chooses the principal of the year by the qualities of dedication and commitment to the mission and ministry of Catholic education. “When one enters St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School,” Boyle said, “you are immediately struck with the reverence and awe that are shown to each child. Fran exemplifies the motto: ‘Jesus is the reason for the school.’”
Thursday, 12 April 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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What was there about North Camden that challenged Jesuit Father Richard Malloy? What nudged the Irish Catholic priest into thinking like a social scientist and nurtured the seeds of his new book, "A Faith that Frees: Catholic Matters for the 21st Century"? (Orbis Books. 232p, $18). Father Richard Malloy, assistant professor of anthropology and sociology at St. Joseph's University, Philadelphia, Pa., served 15 years at Holy Name Church, Camden, from 1988 to 2003.
Thursday, 03 January 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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CAMDEN — Locating a methadone clinic here in the Waterfront South neighborhood would violate the right of privacy of addicts who would come there for help, said Msgr. Michael Doyle, pastor of Sacred Heart Church that was host Monday night to a rally protesting the relocation of the Parkside Clinic from near Cooper Hospital to Waterfront South. The rally, which attracted more than 175 interested residents, was co-sponsored by Sacred Heart and Camden Churches Organized for People . City officials and police brass were invited but only Councilman Bill Spearman showed up. Police officials were forbidden to attend the meeting,according to Pat Mulligan of Heart of Camden Housing Corp., a member of CCOP,which rehabilitates abandoned homes.
Friday, 01 February 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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Camden Churches Organized for People represents all faiths, all people and they gather with common cause: to better their home base of Camden, a city where the odds seem to be stacked against many residents. This organization is a recipient of the Monsignor Michael Doyle and Monsignor Robert McDermott Award for Parish and Community at this year’s Catholic Charities, Diocese of Camden’s, “Justice for ALL” awards dinner, recognizing leaders in social justice. CCOP brings together families from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, different religious traditions, different neighborhoods around the city and region in a common effort to address the serious concerns which affect families and communities.  CCOP has thrived in Camden for 23 years, through various member congregations working with partners in the public and private sectors.
Thursday, 27 March 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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CAMDEN — Four people will be inducted into the new Hall ofFame of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel and Fatima Parish in ceremonies to be held at Auletto Caterers of West Deptford on Feb. 22. The individuals represent the spirit of the church and fortheir longstanding dedication to Mt. Carmel/Fatima, according to Vincent DiPasquale, one of the organizers of the Hall of Fame. The ceremony will be part of a Doo Wop Party slated for that night which could be an annual event along with inductions into the Hall of Fame, said DiPasquale, co-chair of the Doo Wop Party along with Digna M.Quiles. Slated to be named in ceremonies are Camden City Judge Joseph Rodriquez, Frank Vespe, Jimmy Auletto, and Lucy Alicea.
Thursday, 14 February 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
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More than one hundred parishioners and pastors from three Camden city parishes, Holy Name, Our Lady of Mount Carmel/Fatima and the Cathedral  of the Immaculate Conception gathered at the Cathedral Thursday, May 15 for an evening prayer service, which included time for reflections on the announcement last month by Bishop Galante that the parishes will merge. In his April 3 announcement, Bishop announced his intention that the Cathedral would be the primary worship site, with a secondary worship site at Our Lady of Mt.Carmel/Fatima Church. The service was held to bring parishioners together, to provide an opportunity to get to know one another better, and to do it in the context of prayer and fellowship. Musicians from the parishes present chose the music for the service. Prayers and music were in both English and Spanish. A social followed with coffee, cake and homemade desserts.
Thursday, 22 May 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
News/Latest News
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Phil and Kari Janisse of Williamstown, with Camden seminarian Josh Nevitt, are pictured at the Via della Conciliazione during the canonizations of John Paul II and John XXIII April 27 in Rome. Left, while Pope Francis passed by, Nevitt threw an iRACE4Vocations T-shirt into the popemobile. Somewhere in Rome, Pope Francis is (possibly? likely?) wearing an iRACE4 Vocations T-shirt. On April 27 an estimated 800,000 converged in Rome to celebrate the canonization of John Paul II and John XXIII. Their successors, current Pope Francis and retired Pope Benedict XVI, concelebrated the liturgy. After Mass, Pope Francis waved to the crowds from his popemobile, and soon a bright green shirt was hurtling toward him. Josh Nevitt, a third-year seminarian of the Diocese of Camden studying at Pontifical North American College, wadded up the iRACE shirt like a baseball and threw a perfect strike into the popemobile. Five thousand miles away from Rome, in Glassboro, the Diocese of Camden was holding its 3rd annual iRACE4Vocations 5K Run/1 Mile walk at Rowan University. A crowd of over 600 came together to pray for an increase in vocations to the priesthood and religious life, to pray that young men and women might understand the call to holiness, much like John Paul II and John XXIII, the newest members of the communion of saints. In Rome, Nevitt, as well as priests and laity from the Camden Diocese were among the pilgrims near St. Peter's Square in Vatican City to witness the historic occasion: two popes coming together to recognize the sainthood of their predecessors. Kari Janisse, a resident of Williamstown and director of youth ministry at Our Lady of Peace Parish, traveled to Italy with her husband, Phil, and met up with Nevitt. The night before the canonizations, the three camped out on the streets of Rome, off of the Via della Conciliazione, with blankets, food and rosaries in hand, joined by thousands of other pilgrims from around the world. As the crush of attendees made it impossible to move closer to St. Peter's square, the trio moved inside at a local Polish church. "The church was holding an all-night adoration vigil, and then, in the morning, streaming the papal canonization Mass on a jumbo screen set up outside their church," Janisse said. "It was a beautiful way to watch the canonization, being so close but not in the mix of the very large crowd," she said. "At the end of Mass, we walked up the street into the Via della Conciliazione and received the final blessing from the pope, which was extended to bless religious sacramentals and our items we purchased for friends and family." After the blessing, as Pope Francis was driven off in his popemobile, saying farewell, the three snapped pictures, and Nevitt did his best imitation of Steve Carlton. "My husband and I came to Italy to bring a personal, prayerful intention, and other's intentions, to the canonization of John Paul II," Janisse said. Father Timothy Byerley, pastor of Mary, Queen of All Saints in Pennsauken, who traveled to Rome with Father Frederick Link, senior priest at St. Joseph the Worker Parish in Haddon Township, and 31 other pilgrims from the Diocese of Camden, called last Sunday "heavenly." He and Father Link joined the estimated 150 cardinals and bishops and 6,000 priests in attendance. "Every aspect of the Mass, from the music to Pope Francis' charisma, was unforgettable," he said. "While there is no denying the crowds were challenging, it was a tremendous privilege to participate in this historic and inspiring event," he said. "These new saints have left a profound mark on the life of the contemporary church and the response of the faithful confirms that Pope Francis' decision to canonize these two models of sanctity was in perfect accord with the sentiments of Catholics around the world."
Thursday, 01 May 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
CAMDEN — Twenty members of Sacred Heart Parish/Camden Churches Organized for People (CCOP) held a prayer vigil Saturday, Dec. 20, at 438 Emerald Street, an area known for drug dealing, prostitution and trash dumping. Community leaders called on all those present to remember the Christmas message. Processing around the block, they prayed and sang Christmas carols, and talked with neighbors about their concerns and desires for the area.  At the Emerald Street lot, surrounded by candles, the group read a prayer and vowed to say the prayer each night for the neighborhood. “We are an army of people who pray,” said Barbara Coscorello, Sacred Heart Neighborhood/CCOP leader. “We won’t give up, because with faith all things are possible!” Andrea Ferich, Sacred Heart Neighborhood/CCOP leader, said that the group is like the expectant Mary. “We have faith in the good things to come for our community.” The group is taking its concerns to  Councilwoman Dana Burley. One person a day for the next 22 days is going call the councilwoman’s office and say, “Ms. Burley, I’m praying that you find a solution to the Emerald Street Lot.” In related news, earlier the same day 450 people, including children, gathered at Sacred Heart Parish for prayer and song before delivering 1,120 Christmas baskets plus turkeys to area households. Rev. John Parker of Antioch Baptist Church led the people in prayer, and Msgr. Michael Doyle, pastor of Sacred Heart, addressed the crowd before the baskets were delivered.
Tuesday, 23 December 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Carmela Malerba
Photo by James A. McBride Hillary Peralta accepts the 2014 David T. Coghlan Young Catholic Leader Award Scholarship from Kathy Coghlan. Also pictured are Joan Lind, center, who sponsors the scholarship, and Frances Montgomery, principal of St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School. Hillary Peralta, an eighth grade student at St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School in Camden, is the first place winner of the 2014 David T. Coghlan Young Catholic Leader Award Scholarship. Hillary has received a $1,000 tuition scholarship for her freshman year at Camden Catholic High School in Cherry Hill. In her winning essay, Hillary expressed her gratitude for the gift of her Catholic education, saying, "To me, Catholic education is not based solely on academics. To succeed in society, you need to have grit, character and passion. These are the qualities that are nurtured in a Catholic school." Two second place scholarships of $500 each were merited by Stephen Grimmie of St. Joseph Regional School in Somers Point and Michael A. Macera of St. Mary School, Williamstown. Stephen will attend Holy Spirit High School in Absecon and Michael will attend Camden Catholic High School. The David T. Coghlan Young Catholic Leader scholarships are presented each year to eighth grade students who will be attending a diocesan Catholic High School. The scholarship is a memorial in honor of Dr. David Coghlan, who was the superintendent of schools from 1994-2004.
Thursday, 12 June 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Photo by James A. McBride Timothy Heatwole Shenk, physical education teacher at Sacred Heart School, Camden, helps students participate in a sport stacking event. CAMDEN — On Thursday, Nov. 18, Sacred Heart School students here “stacked up” with individuals from all around the globe to break a world record. Seventy fourth- fifth- and sixth -graders participated in the World Sport Stacking Association (WSSA)’s 2010 Stack Up!, which aimed to break its own 2009 Guinness World Record for “Most People Sport Stacking at Multiple Locations in One Day.” In sport stacking, participants up stack and down stack 12 specially designed cups, called Speed Stacks, in predetermined sequences and in various pyramids, as fast as they can. At Sacred Heart, students stacked for 30 minutes, joining other participants from the United States, Germany, Japan, Australia, Columbia, Singapore and the U.K. The WSSA reports that sport stacking is in more than 32,000 schools and youth organizations worldwide. Two years ago, the school’s physical education teacher, Timothy Heatwole Shenk introduced his students to sports stacking after learning about its benefits at a physical education convention. “The students found it to be engaging,” he said. “It’s a great activity for hand-eye coordination, concentration and focus.” Shenk noted that the students’ response to sport stacking has been so positive that he ordered a set of 12 cups for each student to use during physical education classes, and one set for each classroom. As well, students have also gotten sets to practice at home and to teach their family members how to stack. Sport stacking “is something they can get excited about, see their progress and challenge themselves in a tangible way,” Shenk said. After completing the 30 minutes of stacking on the 18th, Shenk sent in his numbers to the WSSA. The 2009 Guinness record of 276,053 stackers was broken this year, with the official 2010 count of 316,757 sport stackers from 1,627 schools, in 25 countries.
Thursday, 02 December 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Columns/As I See It
Author:Father Jeff Putthoff, SJ
A few weeks ago, Camden had its deadliest July since 1949. That was the year that Howard Unruh, America’s first serial killer, killed 13 people on one day. This year, 13 people were murdered over the course of 31 days. At the time, I commented on how differently the violence in Camden would be covered by the news media if it had been done by a single serial killer as opposed to many killers. Amazingly, with the killings in the movie theater in Aurora, Colo., we see how gripping one killer of many is to the country. We also now have a case of domestic terrorism — and significant international news coverage — with the horrible killings outside a Sikh temple in Wisconsin this month. Both of these incidents were unimaginable tragedies that have sparked hundreds upon thousands of debates and even more news stories. Both have elicited outrage and even responses from President Obama. Here in Camden, where more people were killed last month than in either of the tragedies in Colorado or Wisconsin, there has been limited outrage and media coverage. In fact, there has been more attention and news about the new medical school than there has been about the people that are dying right outside its walls in the streets. Just recently, I had in my office a young man who was speaking of his grief about losing a friend last month to a shooting. This was his second friend in a year who has been shot and killed. The loss is real, the trauma of the violence is deep, and most alarming is the lack of moral outrage that accompanies the “domestic terrorism” visited upon the people of Camden. Across the river, in State College, the crimes of Jerry Sandusky have been met with outrage. The outrage is not only about what was done to many young people, but the fact that so many people seem to have known or had some information about what was going on and chose to put Penn State’s image or football program first. In Camden, murders are not being properly prioritized. Not only is our city being traumatized by ongoing, incessant violence and the trauma of losing life, but there is also a terrible public acquiescing that keeps it protected and perpetual. Such a lack of outrage is itself abusive. It “normalizes” the violence, making the unconscionable acceptable and continuing to wound the already wounded. The question to be asked is, why do 13 murders in 31 days in a city of 77,000 find so little voice, so little reaction in our world today? A movie theater, a temple, and a football locker room all engender a response that the streets of Camden don’t seem to warrant. Camden is facing escalating crime and death. And yet the outrage is muted, the TV networks don’t send news trucks, and no memorial is held. Indeed, Governor Christie asked that the flags be flown at half mast for the Colorado killings while no such action was taken on behalf of the people of Camden. It is the ultimate bullying: collusion with an abusive situation. In State College, such collusion is why Joe Paterno’s statue was taken down and why some officials may go to jail. As long as we continue to know and not act, the systemic and repeated abuse of Camden will continue. The ongoing abuse and violence that is occurring in Camden needs to stop. The lack of action around this issue is an outrage. Jesuit Father Jeff Putthoff is executive director, Hopeworks ’N Camden. E-mail him at jeff@hopeworks.org. A version of this essay was first printed in the Philadelphia Inquirer on Sunday, Aug. 19.
Thursday, 30 August 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
Author:Admin2
Camden Volunteers for this year (2011-12) gather for a photo with Father Michael McCue of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Camden; Sister Helen Cole, Holy Name of Camden Ministries; and Kevin Moran, volunteer support. The Camden Volunteers consist of Franciscan Volunteers, Jesuit Volunteers, DeSales Service Works and Action Reconciliation Service for Peace (from Germany). The young people, all recent college graduates, make a commitment to social justice by living in the city for one or two years and working in church ministries. They are pictured before a commissioning Mass Oct. 17 at DeSales Service Works, 522 State Street.
Thursday, 03 November 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Youth & Young Adult/Youth and Young Adults News
Camden youth are participating in a non-partisan “Be My Vote” campaign. A rally was scheduled to take place on Friday afternoon, Oct. 30, at the steps of Camden City Hall, four days before Election Day. The event is sponsored by Camden Churches Organized by People (CCOP), a non-partisan organization that in the last six weeks has organized a series of public meetings to educate voters and voice their concerns. CCOP leaders have met with Gov. Jon Corzine, Gubernatorial candidate Chris Christie, and all four mayoral candidates (Angel Cordero, Roberto Feliz, Mujiba Salaam Parker, and Dana Redd). The teen-led rally was to include an excerpt from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s April 18, 1959 speech, where the civil rights leader spoke to 26,000 high school students before a youth march; a preview of the five-day campaign; and a non-partisan youth appeal to all registered New Jersey voters. “The Be My Vote campaign is not about voting for any particular candidate. We are not going to tell you how to vote; you are an adult and should do you own homework,” said Erasmo Rivera, youth leader from St. Anthony of Padua Church in Camden, and one of Friday’s speakers. “What we are going to say is that you have a responsibility, and you need to take it seriously. The youth of Camden are watching you and are counting on all of you not to let us down. Our futures depend on it.” Camden faith-based youth groups expected to attend the rally include those from three Catholic parishes, St. Anthony of Padua, St. Bartholomew and St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral, as well as Faith Tabernacle Church of the Living God, and Camden Bible Tabernacle.
Thursday, 29 October 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Catholic Schools/Catholic School News
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff/More photos www.ccdphotoalbum.com The CamdeNerz, consisting of students of the Catholic schools serving Camden City, stand behind their project in the LEGO robotics regional qualifying tournament held at Rowan University on Saturday, Dec. 5. GLASSBORO — A team of self-described Catholic school nerds went to Rowan University on Saturday, Dec. 5, and won the Judges Award in a LEGO robotics competition. The 10-person team — the “CamdeNerdz” — included students from the five Catholic elementary schools serving students in Camden City. They joined together for the first time to participate in the national LEGO robotics regional qualifying tournament. The competiton presented real-world engineering challenges to students aged 9-14. This year students were asked to research a transportation problem in their community and develop an innovative solution. Drawing on math, science, engineering, and technology skills, the students designed, built and programmed LEGO robots to respond to the challenge. During the competition, each team presented their project to a panel of judges, participated in technical interviews about the robot design, and explained how the project responds to the particular challenge. The members of the Camden Team were: — Yoceline Tenorio and Elijah Hines, both seventh grade, from St. Anthony of Padua School, — Johangeliz Febo and Samantha Thach, both eighth grade, from St. Cecilia School, Pennsauken, — Lisa Hoang and Kimtom Vork, both sixth grade, from St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral School, — Elodie Fofana and Tony Barr, both seventh grade, from Sacred Heart School, and — Jamil Santiago, sixth grade, and Christian Colon, eighth grade, from Holy Name School. The Camden team was sponsored by Mount St. Joseph Academy in Flourtown, Pa., which itself boasts an all girls robotics team. Their team, the Firebirds, which was formed 10 years ago, is only the second all girls team formed in the national competition and is now the longest running all girls team in the nation. The formation of a single robotics team with representatives from all five Camden-area schools is the natural outgrowth of a larger initiative now underway to strengthen Catholic education in the nation’s most dangerous and impoverished city. Last year the Diocese of Camden and the International Education Foundation (IEF) / CSDP formed the “Catholic School Partnership,” a major initiative that has brought together the expertise of top education, management, finance and advancement executives to strengthen the Catholic elementary schools that serve some of the most disadvantaged students in South Jersey. With the Partnership, the five schools, which together serve more than 1,000 students, have been brought under the direction of a five-person management team and a 12 person board of directors. Sister Karen Dietrich, executive director of the Partnership, said, “We are providing a strong education for students in this struggling city through a first-rate education in the classroom, but we also want to provide opportunities outside the classroom that will expand horizons for these talented students. It is our hope that their participation for the first time in the robotics competition will encourage the value of team-work, apply critical-thinking skills they’ve learned in the classroom to real-life problems, and inspire today’s Camden city students to be the innovators of tomorrow.”
Thursday, 10 December 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
On Dec 15, 1937, it was announced that the first bishop of Camden would be Father Bartholomew J. Eustace of New York, then 50 years old. On May 3, 1938, 5,000 people lined the streets leading from the railway station at Haddonfield as the new bishop made his way in a motorcade down Haddon Avenue to the rectory of his new cathedral, Immaculate Conception Church, in Camden. The past history of Catholicism in South Jersey strongly inspired Bishop’s Eustace’s homily at his installation May 4 in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. He dedicated the new diocese to the Blessed Virgin Mary “to take under her care and protection from this moment henceforth the infant Church of Camden.” In the homily, Bishop Eustace committed his whole self to Camden when he said: “By the cross I bear I vow to be a faithful leader, gentle father and true bishop. Floreat Camdenum! (May Camden flourish).” He pointed to the many challenges that he and his people were to face and said, “In proportion as afterwards a building rise high, so the foundation must be deep, and all that Camden is ever to be is rightly founded in commencement on my heart.”
Tuesday, 20 December 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Carmela Malerba
Throughout the Diocese of Camden, parishes held celebrations marking Jesus' birth. Photos from left: Shepherd Mike Santana with his camel, Quasi, during the live Nativity at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish in Galloway on Dec. 21; youngsters of Divine Mercy Parish, Vineland, sing Christmas carols to residents at Bishop McCarthy Residence, on Dec. 20; Father Piotr Szamocki, pastor of St. Joachim in Bellmawr, speaks to children during a recent Christmas gathering at the parish. Photos at left and in middle by Alan M. Dumoff, photo at right by Andrew Ennis
Thursday, 02 January 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Photo by James A. McBride                   Bishop Dennis Sullivan instituted two seminarians, Edward Kennedy and Matthew Corbett, to the Ministry of the Acolyte at St. Peter Church in Merchantville on March 10. Above, the two men kneel before the bishop. Above, standing with the bishop and the Knights of Columbus, are Edward Kennedy; his mother, Theresa McGettigan Kennedy; Maryann Corbett, Matthew’s mother; Corbett; his uncle, Bill Baker; and Father Michael Romano, director of vocations.
Thursday, 14 March 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Admin2
Nine candidates in the diaconate formation program were instituted to the Ministry of Acolyte during a Eucharistic Liturgy on Feb. 24 at Church of the Incarnation, Mantua. Bishop Joseph A. Galante presided. The men are Craig Arthur Bickel of St. Rose of Lima Parish, Haddon Heights; James Joseph Hallman of Our Lady of Peace Parish, Williamstown; Robert William Hamilton of St. Rose of Lima Parish, Haddon Heights; Mark Jude Lacy of St. Josephine Bakhita Parish, Camden; John Michael Lynch of Transfiguration Parish, Collingswood; Robert George Oliver of St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Mays Landing; Joseph Gerard Rafferty of St. Mary Parish, Gloucester City; Aaron Gene Smith of St. Rose of Lima Parish, Haddon Heights; and J. Peter Traum of Incarnation Parish, Mantua.
Thursday, 03 March 2011 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
On Sunday, Feb. 10, two parishes in the Diocese of Camden hosted the Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion for those catechumens and candidates confirming God’s call to be his. St. Isidore, Vineland, and St. Agnes, Blackwood, drew a total of 236 candidates and 108 catechumens, according to the Camden Diocese’s RCIA Office. Sponsors, parish RCIA teams, and relatives also came out to support those preparing to enter the Catholic Church. Those catechumens and candidates from the Camden, Gloucester, and Atlantic counties celebrated the 2 p.m. ceremony at St. Agnes, where the presider was Msgr. Robert T. McDermott, vicar general and pastor of St. Joseph Pro-Cathedral, Camden. Those from Salem, Cumberland, and Cape May counties attended the 6 p.m. ceremony at St. Isidore, with Msgr. John H.Burton, vicar general and pastor of St. Isidore, presiding.
Thursday, 14 February 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report | Read more
News/Latest News
Author:Carmela Malerba
The Office of Child and Youth Protection is announcing CAP (Child Assault Prevention) sessions. CAP is the safe environment training program for adults who have regular contact with minors. Attendance is required in order to comply with the USCCB's Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People. The policy of the Diocese of Camden is that adults will attend CAP once every five years. CAP 1 teaches attendees to recognize child abuse and neglect and how to report to the proper authorities. Adults are taught that children have the right to be safe, strong and free. CAP 1 is for new volunteers and employees. CAP 2 is called No More Bullies, No More Victims and is a workshop addressing bullying awareness and bullying prevention. Cyber-bullying is also presented. CAP 3 is called Cyber-Empowerment and is a workshop which promotes adults understanding of cyber activity of youth while teaching them realistic ways to help children keep their own rights and guard the rights of others in the cyber-sphere. Each presentation is 90 minutes. Adults who are new employees or volunteers should attend CAP 1 before attending CAP 2 or CAP 3. After five years, adults have the option of attending CAP 1 or 2 again if they prefer. The following sessions will be offered in April: CAP Phase 1 Thursday, April 3, 7 p.m., Holy Eucharist Parish, Cherry Hill Friday, April 4, 7 p.m., Most Precious Blood Parish, West Collingswood, school CAP Phase 2 - Bullying Prevention Wednesday, April 2, 12:45 p.m., Cape Trinity Catholic School, Wildwood Thursday, April 10, 7 p.m., Holy Eucharist Parish, Cherry Hill CAP Phase 3 - Cyber Empowerment Wednesday, April 30, 3 p.m., Our Lady of Mercy Academy, Newfield To attend, call the CAP registration line in the Office of Child and Youth Protection at 856-583-6165 or email Diane.Diggons@camdendiocese.org to register. Register at least five days before the session.The CAP schedule, location, phone numbers and directions may be found on the diocesan website @ www.camdendiocese.org In case of inclement weather, call the location directly.
Thursday, 20 March 2014 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Carmela Malerba
The Office of Child and Youth Protection is announcing CAP (Child Assault Prevention) sessions. CAP is the safe environment training program for adults who have regular contact with minors. Attendance is required in order to comply with the USCCB's Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People. The policy of the diocese is that adults will attend CAP once every five years. CAP 1 teaches attendees to recognize child abuse and neglect and how to report to the proper authorities. Adults are taught that children have the right to be safe, strong and free. CAP 1 is for new volunteers and employees. CAP 2 is No More Bullies, No More Victims and is a workshop on bullying awareness and bullying prevention. Cyberbullying is also addressed. Both sessions are 90 minutes. Adults must attend CAP 1 before attending CAP 2. After five years, adults have the option of attending CAP 1 again if they prefer. The following sessions will be offered in February: CAP Phase 1 Tuesday, Feb. 5, 7 p.m., Christ the King, Haddonfield, Lower Church Thursday, Feb. 7, 7 p.m., Christ Our Light, Cherry Hill, School Auditorium Monday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m., Bishop McHugh Regional School, Cape May Ct. House, Library Monday, Feb. 11, 7 p.m., Guardian Angels School, Paulsboro Site, Gym Wednesday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m., St. Michael the Archangel School, Clayton, Gym Monday, Feb. 25, 7 p.m., Paul VI High School, Haddon Township, Learning Media Center CAP Phase 2 - Bullying Prevention NO CAP Phase 2 To attend one of these classes, please call the CAP registration line in the Office of Child and Youth Protection at (856) 583-6165 or email ddiggons@camdendiocese.org to register. Please register at least five days before the session you would like to attend. The CAP schedule, location phone numbers and directions may be found on the diocesan website @ www.camdendiocese.org In case of inclement weather please call the location of the CAP session you are attending.
Thursday, 24 January 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
Español/Spanish/Español/Spanish
Author:Rich Luongo
Foto James A. McBride Las personas que completaron el entrenamiento en seguridad en el trabajo y los derechos de los trabajadores, muestran sus certificados y posan para una foto después de la servicio de Oración en la Pro-Catedral San José, Camden, el domingo 19 de agosto. El taller de 12 horas, que se llevó a cabo en la parroquia, estuvo a cargo de representantes de (La Administración Ocupacional de la Seguridad y la Salud) OSHA (por su sigla en Inglés). CAMDEN — Trabajadores que pasan días en obras de construcción, o manejan de forma rutinaria equipo de jardinería, pasaron horas en la parroquia San José Pro-Catedral para aprender sobre seguridad en el trabajo y saber qué hacer si sus derechos son violados. La parroquia organizó un taller de OSHA de 12 horas al que asistieron más de 30 hombres y mujeres. Todos eran inmigrantes de habla hispana. La mayoría eran de la parroquia, pero algunos llegaron desde lugares tan lejanos como Pennsylvania. Los que terminaron el taller de OSHA de 12 horas recibieron certificados durante una ceremonia el domingo, 19 de agosto. La Hermana Verónica Roche de San José, Asociada Pastoral, quien ayudó a coordinar el taller, dice que el programa de 10 horas se extendió dos horas más para integrar componentes religiosos y compartir experiencias. El taller lo llevó a cabo Stuart Sydenstricker de OSHA quien, junto con su esposa Diana Mejía, presidió tres talleres en febrero sobre los derechos de los inmigrantes. Ellos están asociados con Viento y Espíritu en Morristown, un grupo pro-inmigrantes de diversas comunidades religiosas con cede en Morristown. OSHA (Administración de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional) es una agencia federal de los Estados Unidos que regula la salud y seguridad en el trabajo. El programa de difusión de capacitación de OSHA para la industria de la construcción proporciona capacitación a los trabajadores para evitar riesgos en el trabajo. El programa también proporciona información sobre los derechos de los trabajadores, responsabilidades del empleador y cómo presentar una queja. San José, una parroquia multiétnica de unas 900 familias del Este de Camden, considera la justicia social como parte esencial de su misión. La parroquia es hogar del Centro Romero, un centro de ministerios y retiros urbanos; La Casa de José, un Ministerio de la ciudad para personas sin hogar; y La Sociedad de Carpinteros de San José, una entidad de vivienda sin fines de lucro. La parroquia también es miembro del CCOP (Iglesias de Camden Organizadas para el Pueblo), un grupo que aboga por la ciudad.
Thursday, 30 August 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Faced with declining enrollments, Our Lady Star of the Sea Regional School in Cape May and St. Ann Regional School in Wildwood will combine at the Wildwood campus beginning with the 2010-11 school year.  Both schools will remain open for the 2009-10 school year to provide time to prepare for the transition. Parents were informed of the need to combine the schools in a May 11 letter from Nicholas Regina, executive director of Catholic Schools and Mary Boyle, superintendent of schools. Despite increased marketing efforts at the schools, both Our Lady Star of the Sea and St. Ann have struggled with enrollment.  Our Lady Star of the Sea has 162 students and St. Ann has 158 students, down from 247 and 331 a decade ago.   The decline in the enrollment has placed financial burdens not only on the schools themselves, but also on their sponsoring parishes.  When schools are severely under-enrolled, a disproportionate share of parish income is directed to offset decreased tuition revenue even as other parish needs also are pressing. The letter to parents noted that declines in enrollment have not been limited to the Catholic schools, but appear symptomatic of larger demographic forces at work in Lower Cape May County. A report in the Press of Atlantic City last fall, for example, showed that enrollment in public school districts in this area has declined significantly in the last five years, with Lower Township down 6 percent, Wildwood down 4 percent, Wildwood Crest down 21 percent, Cape May down 25 percent and West Cape May down 40 percent. The Catholic Schools Office of the diocese intends to work to place as many teachers from the schools as possible and, for those that cannot be placed, the diocese will offer a separation package to assist them during their transition to new employment.  Meanwhile, a transition team will be formed by June of this year to help prepare the schools for merger and informational meetings for parents of both schools are being held.
Thursday, 14 May 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
News/Latest News
Author:Carl Peters
In talking about being called by Pope Benedict XVI to serve as the eighth bishop of Camden, Bishop Dennis Sullivan referred to Caravaggio's "The Calling of St. Matthew," which features a humbled apostle who finds himself literally and figuratively in the light of Christ. Jesus' hand and arm, stretched out toward a surprised St. Matthew, recalls God the Father's in Michelangelo's "Creation of Adam" in the Sistine Chapel. In "The Calling of St. Matthew," the artist relies on the simplicity of the Gospel and depicts "the precise moment at which a man's life changes forever - and becomes something else completely," Francine Prose writes in her book "Caravaggio: Painter of Miracles." Part of Caravaggio's power in his religious themes, she argues, is his ability to present "the paradoxical ordinariness of a miracle." "By making us inescapably aware that we are looking at flesh-and-blood men and women, painted from nature, Caravaggio emphasizes the humanity of Christ and his disciples, of the Virgin and the Magdalene," she writes. The painter was commissioned to paint "The Calling" and another canvas, "The Martydom of St. Matthew," for the lateral walls of the Contarelli Chapel in San Luigi dei Francesi, Rome, in 1599. Completed the following year, the two works established his fame. A temperamental man who lived a tumultuous life, Caravaggio died 10 years after completing "The Calling of St. Matthew." He was 39 years old.
Thursday, 10 January 2013 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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CAMDEN — The “Recovery Express,” on its way to Washington, D.C., stopped in Camden on March 9 for lunch and for a prayer rally in an attempt to highlight the effects of the foreclosure crisis in the city. Josh Chisholm, executive director of Camden Churches Organized for People (CCOP) noted that the tour was a caravan that had started out in Oakland, Calif., visiting the 10 hardest hit cities across the country where foreclosures are running rampant. In Washington the “Recovery Riders” urged the Obama Administration and the Congress to fix the bankruptcy law to allow bankruptcy judges to modify mortgage loans if the banks refuse to work with the homeowners. Chisholm pointed out that even before the “Recovery Express” rode into Washington, various things had been going on in Camden. Msgr. Robert McDermott, pastor of St. Joseph’s Pro-Cathedral Church and a lifelong Camden resident, for example, was one of the founding members of CCOP and was here during the economic crisis of the mid-’80s. He has worked ever since to get Camden to pick itself up. He has focused on issues of crime, housing, healthcare, public safety, and the economic and political stability of Camden. Rev. Willie Anderson, pastor at Sword of the Spirit Church where the prayer rally was held, has — in the last 10 years — closed down open air drug markets and worked to combat the legacy of blight and abandonment in the neighborhood through his work with CCOP, the Oasis Community Development Corporation, and through his congregation. In 2008 there were 9,026 foreclosures in Camden City, an increase of 164 percent over 2007. One in 470 housing units in the city is in foreclosure. And in December Camden’s unemployment rate was 45.7 percent. Despite all this Camden’s property values have remained fairly stable dropping by only $1,000 between December 2006 and last December. A factor behind this is Camden Home Improvement Program (CHIP), created nearly three years ago by CCOP and city leaders to help low- and moderate-income residents make life and safety improvements to their homes to help raise property values.  “Forgivable loans” of up to $20,000 are created that burn off at a rate of 20 percent per year.  The program grew out of CCOP’s efforts over the last decade to ensure that redevelopment projects brought tangible benefits to the city’s residents.
Thursday, 12 March 2009 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Peter G. Sånchez
Photo by Alan M. Dumoff   Standing from left at the Eucharistic Celebration in the African Traditions on Saturday, Oct. 30, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish were Deacon Vincent Okoro, Juliet Njoku, Bishop Joseph A. Galante, Cardinal Peter Turkson, and Juliet’s husband, Nnanna Ngene.   Bringing together African-born Catholics from the Diocese of Camden and beyond, the fifth annual Eucharistic Celebration in the African Traditions was celebrated Saturday, Oct. 30, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, St. Lawrence Church in Lindenwold. Some 250-300 members of the African Catholic community came to share their spirituality, and their rich and diverse cultures. Ghanaian Cardinal Peter Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Joseph A. Galante; Father Joseph Capella, pastor, Our Lady of Guadalupe; and priests and deacons from the African Catholic community. The cardinal was in the area to visit his friend, Father Peter Saporito, pastor of St. Padre Pio Parish, Vineland. On Monday, Nov. 1, the cardinal celebrated Mass for students, faculty and staff of St. Mary School, East Vineland. Akwaaba child dancers from Haiti, performed a “Hallowing of the Space” to drive out evil from the church. The Nigerian Iwene Tansi Ibo Choir, from St. Cyprian Church in Philadelphia, sang the entrance processional hymn. Music was provided by the Unity Choir from Haiti, and the Prayer of the Faithful was read in the traditional languages of Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Ghana, Cote D’Ivoire, Zambia, Haiti, Liberia, Cameroon, Rwanda, and South Africa. Corlis Sellers, Coordinator of the Black Catholic Ministry Commission for the Diocese of Camden, called the day “a beautiful, colorful, festive celebration of African tradition.” Echoing Bishop Galante’s homily, which reminded the congregation that all are holy in God’s eyes, and are called to share their faith, spirituality, and culture with others, Deacon Vincent Okoro, from St. Andrew the Apostle, Gibbsboro, said the congregation “came together as people of God, to offer our spirituality to the diocese.” After the Mass, a reception took place, where all in attendance could enjoy food from various African traditions.
Thursday, 04 November 2010 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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Author:Admin2
PHILADELPHIA (CNS) — Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua, retired archbishop of Philadelphia, died Jan. 31 at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, where he resided. According to the Philadelphia Archdiocese, he died in his sleep at 9:15 p.m. He was 88. Cardinal Bevilacqua headed the archdiocese from February 1988 to October 2003. Funeral arrangements were pending. Pope Benedict XVI mourned the death of the cardinal, expressing his “heartfelt condolences” in a telegram sent to Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput. The pope praised the late cardinal’s “long-standing commitment to social justice and the pastoral care of immigrants, and his expert contribution to the revision of the church’s law in the years following the Second Vatican Council.” His death leaves the College of Cardinals with 191 members, 107 of whom are under the age of 80 and, therefore, eligible to vote in a conclave. Just a day before his death a Philadelphia judge ruled that Cardinal Bevilacqua, who suffered from dementia, was competent and could be become a witness in the upcoming trial of a Philadelphia priest, Msgr. William J. Lynn. The priest is accused of having failed to protect children from two priests who were under his direction when he served as secretary of the clergy. In 1990 Cardinal Bevilacqua joined Camden Bishop James T. McHugh in a dispute with the Philadelphia Inquirer. In a joint press conference held in Philadelphia, the two prelates took issue with an Inquirer editorial and editorial cartoon following Bishop McHugh’s decision that public figures who favor abortion rights should receive no recognition from Catholic organizations. Cardinal Bevilacqua asked the Inquirer, and received, equal space and prominence in the paper for a statement on the issues of religious tolerance and freedom, written by him and Bishop McHugh. But Msgr. Lynn’s defense lawyers said the cardinal could no longer recognize the priest who had been his longtime aide. In February 2011, Cardinal Bevilacqua and other archdiocesan officials were named in a civil lawsuit filed anonymously by a 28-year-old man. The man claimed he had been abused and named his alleged abusers in the suit as well as the cardinal and others he said failed to prevent the abuse. They included Cardinal Justin Rigali, who is now retired but succeeded Cardinal Bevilacqua as head of the Philadelphia Archdiocese. The civil suit was filed four days after the Philadelphia district attorney released a new report by a grand jury investigating clergy sex abuse in the archdiocese. In response to the report, which brought criminal indictments and followed a 2005 report, Cardinal Rigali, calling sex abuse of children a crime and “always wrong and always evil,” outlined new actions to respond to abuse allegations. Anthony Joseph Bevilacqua was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., June 17, 1923, and ordained a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn June 11, 1949, after studies at Immaculate Conception Seminary in Huntington, N.Y. He had a master’s degree in political science from Columbia University in New York, a doctorate in canon law from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome and a doctorate in civil law from St. John’s University in Jamaica, N.Y. Admitted to the New York and Pennsylvania bars and to the bar of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1988, he may have been the only cardinal in U.S. history accredited to argue cases before that body. He was diocesan chancellor and founding director of the Brooklyn Migration and Refugee Office when he was named an auxiliary bishop of Brooklyn in 1980. He was ordained a bishop Nov. 24 of that year. Three years later, he was named bishop of Pittsburgh and installed Dec. 12, 1983. Earlier that year, he was the Vatican-appointed delegate to resolve a dispute between Mercy Sister Agnes Mary Mansour and then-Archbishop Edmund C. Szoka of Detroit. The dispute arose over the nun’s position as state director of social services in Michigan, a post that involved funding abortions. When then-Bishop Bevilacqua told her she had to leave her job or her order if she would not publicly oppose state-funded abortions, she resigned from the Mercy Sisters. In the early 1980s, as chairman of the Committee on Canonical Affairs, he led the U.S. bishops through the first phases of implementing the new 1983 Code of Canon Law and making appropriate U.S. adaptations. As head of the Committee on Migration, he pushed for quick government action in 1983 to accommodate the needs of tens of thousands of Cambodian refugees. He regularly fought for more generous laws and policies to deal with undocumented immigrants. In Pittsburgh, he caused a national stir in 1986 when he said women could not be included in the Holy Thursday ritual washing of feet in parishes. A top Vatican official said his decision was in accord with the church rubric, which refers only to men, but at Bishop Bevilacqua’s request the U.S. bishops’ liturgy committee studied the issue and said a “variation” that included women in the ritual, in wide use around the country, was also legitimate. Bishop Bevilacqua then sent the committee’s memo to all his pastors, asking them to use their own judgment on the matter. He was a papally appointed member of the 1987 world Synod of Bishops, on the role of laity in the church and world. In Philadelphia, one of his first major decisions was to launch a capital campaign to create an education fund that would offset yearly deficits in the archdiocese’s extensive Catholic school system. He served many years on the bishops’ Committee on Pro-Life Activities and spoke out often to condemn abortion and defend unborn life. He was elected chairman of the committee in 2001. He made spiritual renewal of the people a top priority and regularly visited parishes, schools, hospitals, prisons and other institutions in the archdiocese. He hosted a weekly radio call-in program, “Live With Cardinal Bevilacqua,” which aired on WZZD-AM from 1995 to 2000. He was a former member of the Vatican Congregation for Saints’ Causes, the Congregation for Clergy, the Pontifical Council Cor Unum, the Pontifical Council for Migrants and Travelers and the commission of cardinals that oversees the Vatican bank. He also was a former chairman of the Papal Foundation, a U.S. foundation dedicated to providing financial assistance to the Holy See.
Thursday, 02 February 2012 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report
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By Mark Pattison Catholic News Service  WASHINGTON — Cardinal Avery Dulles, a Jesuit theologian who was made a cardinal in 2001, died Dec. 12 at the Jesuit infirmary in New York, Murray-Weigel Hall. A cause of death was not released but he had been in poor health. He was 90 years old. Cardinal Dulles had been the oldest living U.S. cardinal. His death was announced by the New York-based Jesuit provincial’s office. An evening wake was scheduled for Dec. 16 and 17 at Fordham University Church, followed by the celebration of Mass each evening. A funeral Mass for the cardinal was scheduled for Dec. 18 at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, followed by burial at the Jesuit Cemetery in Auriesville, N.Y. His death “brings home to God a great theologian and a totally dedicated servant of the church,” said Cardinal Francis E. George of Chicago, president of the U.S. bishops. “I am deeply saddened at the loss of a personal friend, but I rejoice in the hope that now he sees clearly what he explored so well in his studies on revelation, on grace and on the nature of the church and the papal office,” he said in a statement. Cardinal Dulles gave what was described as a farewell address in April, delivering the Laurence J. McGinley lecture at Jesuit-run Fordham University. In the presentation Cardinal Dulles reconfirmed his faith, his orthodoxy, his spirituality and his commitment to the Society of Jesus. He also offered a final word against the materialism, relativism, subjectivism, hedonism, scientism and superficial anti-intellectualism he said is found in modern society. Later that month he had a private meeting with Pope Benedict XVI during the pontiff’s visit to New York. “It was a lovely meeting,” said Dominican Sister Anne-Marie Kirmse, the cardinal’s executive assistant for the past 20 years. “The pope literally bounded into the room with a big smile on his face,” she told Catholic News Service. The session was called a significant meeting of “two of the leading Catholic theologians who interpreted Vatican II for a generation,” by Father James Massa, executive director of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Secretariat of Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. Father Massa said Dec. 12 that Cardinal Dulles was a “reliable and faithful interpreter” of the Second Vatican Council for “a generation of priests, scholars and faithful.” Pope John Paul II, who began the practice of naming as cardinals priest-theologians who were already past age 80 and therefore ineligible to vote in a conclave, included Cardinal Dulles in the group of cardinals created in 2001. Cardinal Dulles, the son of former Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and nephew of onetime CIA director Allen Walsh Dulles, both of whom served in the Eisenhower administration, became known in his own right for his groundbreaking 1974 work “Models of the Church” — one of 22 books published under his name — in which he defined the church as institution, mystical communion, sacrament, herald, servant and community of disciples, and critiqued each. Born Aug. 24, 1918, Cardinal Dulles was the grandson of a Presbyterian minister. He joined the Catholic Church as a young man after he went through a period of unbelief. “In becoming a Catholic, I felt from the beginning that I was joining the communion of the saints,” he said at a 2004 lecture in New York on author C.S. Lewis. “I found great joy at the sense of belonging to a body of believers that stretched across the face of the globe.” He entered the Catholic Church in 1941 while a student at Harvard Law School. He served in the Navy in World War II, then entered the Jesuits after his discharge in 1946. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1956. Cardinal Dulles had been the Laurence J. McGinley professor of religion and society at Fordham since 1988. He also had taught in Washington at the former Woodstock College, now folded into Georgetown University, in 1960-74, and The Catholic University of America, 1974-88. He had also been a visiting professor at Catholic, Protestant and secular colleges and universities. Past president of both the Catholic Theological Society of America and the American Theological Society, Cardinal Dulles served on the International Theological Commission and as a member of the U.S. Lutheran-Roman Catholic dialogue. He also served as a consultant to the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Doctrine.
Thursday, 18 December 2008 | Print | PDF |  E-mail | Report


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